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22,810 full-text articles. Page 7 of 468.

Contemporary Practice Of The United States Relating To International Law (112:2 Am J Int'l L), Jean Galbraith 2018 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Contemporary Practice Of The United States Relating To International Law (112:2 Am J Int'l L), Jean Galbraith

Faculty Scholarship

This article is reproduced with permission from the April 2018 issue of the American Journal of International Law © 2018 American Society of International Law. All rights reserved.

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The Effect Of Culture And Religion On Enforcement Of International Arbitration Awards In Iran, Atoosa Zeinali 2018 Golden Gate University School of Law

The Effect Of Culture And Religion On Enforcement Of International Arbitration Awards In Iran, Atoosa Zeinali

Theses and Dissertations

My goal in this dissertation is to explore some of the rules of Sharia with regard to the arbitration and reduce this level of non-recognition of the Islamic legal system by the West. Also, I am going to analyze the Iranian culture and its effect on enforcement of international arbitration awards and suggest some solutions to reduce the cultural obstacles m the enforcement of foreign arbitration awards.


Fiduciary Duties In Bankruptcy And Insolvency, John A. E. Pottow 2018 University of Michigan Law School

Fiduciary Duties In Bankruptcy And Insolvency, John A. E. Pottow

Law & Economics Working Papers

Insolvency law (bankruptcy law to some) moves so quickly in the cross-border realm that this piece's discussion, started in 2015, is probably already outdated. Nonetheless, I publish it unrepentently because it turns overdue attention to the role of soft law in this domain. Building on earlier work in which I address the role of incrementalism, I discuss the marked success of the UNCITRAL Model Law on Cross-Border Insolvency and its cognate Insolvency Regulation in the EU (the latter now into its "Recast"). As predicted/hoped, the EU Recast, joining other contemporaneous reform projects, is building upon the scaffolding of ...


Competing Sovereignty And Laws’ Domains, Paul B. Stephan 2018 Pepperdine University

Competing Sovereignty And Laws’ Domains, Paul B. Stephan

Pepperdine Law Review

We live in a world of multiple sovereignties. Many think of nation-states as the principal sovereign actors, but sovereign substates and international institutions created by states also hold sway. Each claims a domain, an area (spatial, temporal, conceptual) over which it rules. Ruling includes adopting and applying law. When domains overlap, laws can clash. Competition among sovereigns over legal domains poses a challenge to people who take law into account as they live their lives and plan their futures. What makes these issues immediately important is the growth of the international-law enterprise over the last quarter-century. Both the ambitions and ...


Trump’S First Foreign Trip And The Fate Of The Paris Agreement: Reading The Tea Leaves From The G7 And Nato Summits, David Wirth 2018 Boston College Law School

Trump’S First Foreign Trip And The Fate Of The Paris Agreement: Reading The Tea Leaves From The G7 And Nato Summits, David Wirth

David A. Wirth

No abstract provided.


While Trump Pledges Withdrawal From Paris Agreement On Climate, International Law May Provide A Safety Net, David Wirth 2018 Boston College Law School

While Trump Pledges Withdrawal From Paris Agreement On Climate, International Law May Provide A Safety Net, David Wirth

David A. Wirth

No abstract provided.


Doctrine On The Run: The Deepening Circuit Split Concerning Application Of The Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine To Foreign Nationals, Chloe S. Booth 2018 Boston College Law School

Doctrine On The Run: The Deepening Circuit Split Concerning Application Of The Fugitive Disentitlement Doctrine To Foreign Nationals, Chloe S. Booth

Boston College Law Review

The circuits are currently split on applying the fugitive disentitlement doctrine to a defendant who is a foreign national who resides outside of the United States and is being prosecuted in the United States for conduct that occurred elsewhere. The doctrine provides that a fugitive is prohibited from seeking relief from the justice system whose jurisdiction and authority they evade. Appropriate application of the doctrine is particularly important to foreign defendants as it affects their ability to travel outside of their home country, maintain employment, and protect their personal reputation. This Note discusses the evolution of the fugitive disentitlement doctrine ...


The United Nations Watercourses Convention On The Dawn Of Entry Into Force, Ryan Stoa 2018 Concordia Univeristy School of Law

The United Nations Watercourses Convention On The Dawn Of Entry Into Force, Ryan Stoa

Ryan B. Stoa

The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Non- Navigational Uses of International Watercourses (Watercourses Convention) entered into force in August 2014. Despite overwhelming support when signed in 1997, the ratification process has been slow. As a binding treaty, the Watercourses Convention provides hope that its provisions will articulate legal principles of transboundary water management capable of promoting cooperation and regional agreements. Despite entry into force, however, global support for the Watercourses Convention is weak, concurrent efforts to develop treaty regimes governing water resources create competition for resources and may obscure understandings of international water law, and the foundational ...


Testimonial Statements, Reliability, And The Sole Or Decisive Evidence Rule: A Comparative Look At The Right Of Confrontation In The United States, Canada, And Europe, Deborah Paruch 2018 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Testimonial Statements, Reliability, And The Sole Or Decisive Evidence Rule: A Comparative Look At The Right Of Confrontation In The United States, Canada, And Europe, Deborah Paruch

Catholic University Law Review

Criminal trials in the United States are meant to ascertain the truth. But other societal values, such as fairness to the parties and public confidence in the integrity of the process, are at stake as well. Among the cornerstone rights to protect a defendant’s right to a fair trial is the right to confrontation. The right to confrontation enables a criminal defendant to exclude hearsay evidence from a trial when the defendant did not have an opportunity to cross-examine the witness. This right has undergone substantial changes and revisions over the last decade, both in the United States and ...


The Role Of International Actors In Promoting Rule Of Law In Uganda, Joseph M. Isanga 2018 Concordia University School of Law

The Role Of International Actors In Promoting Rule Of Law In Uganda, Joseph M. Isanga

Joseph Isanga

African conflicts have been caused in part by regimes that do not respect democracy. Uganda is an illustrative case. International actors have played along under an undeclared policy of constructive engagement, but this has essentially served only to delay democratic evolution. As a result, Ugandan leaders have become increasingly autocratic. In such circumstances, reliance on the military and personal rule based on patronage--as opposed to democracy and the rule of law-have become critically important in governance. Yet forceful measures often only beget forceful reactions. The best hope for democracy is for courts to enforce the will of the people as ...


The International Criminal Court, Ten Years Later: Appraisal And Prospects, Joseph M. Isanga 2018 Concordia University School of Law

The International Criminal Court, Ten Years Later: Appraisal And Prospects, Joseph M. Isanga

Joseph Isanga

On March 14, 2012, ten years after the International Criminal Court (ICC) became operational, and with around $900 million spent, the ICC delivered its first judgment. It has issued only thirteen arrest warrants. Is the ICC too slow and too expensive? The Kampala Review Conference held in 2010, seven years after the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Rome Statute) entered into force, could have probed a plethora of questions. Instead, it was a limited stocktaking exercise, leaving many issues unresolved. In 2012, the ICC marked ten years since the Rome Statute entered into force. Seizing upon this milestone ...


Counter-Terrorism And Human Rights: The Emergence Of A Rule Of Customary International Law From U.N. Resolutions, Joseph M. Isanga 2018 Concordia University School of Law

Counter-Terrorism And Human Rights: The Emergence Of A Rule Of Customary International Law From U.N. Resolutions, Joseph M. Isanga

Joseph Isanga

This article is divided into four sections. Section I will discuss how a rule of customary international law generally develops, including discussions of development from conventional sources and the use of United Nations resolutions for finding a rule of customary international law generally. Section II will expound the treatment of and reliance upon the United Nations resolutions as a source of law by the International Court of Justice, in order to facilitate our discussion of an emerging rule of customary international law from resolutions. Section III will consider the limitations for using resolutions as binding statements of opinio juris. Finally ...


Foundations Of Human Rights And Development: A Critique Of African Human Rights Instruments, Joseph M. Isanga 2018 Concordia University School of Law

Foundations Of Human Rights And Development: A Critique Of African Human Rights Instruments, Joseph M. Isanga

Joseph Isanga

This Article argues that, of the contemporary human rights theories, sustainable African development necessitates grounding human rights in complete alignment with the broader perspective of natural law theory, as opposed to narrower perspectives such as utilitarian, positivist, and kindred theories.3 Part I presents pertinent philosophical theories and modes of analysis in conjunction with general international legal jurisprudence. Part II then uses this philosophical analysis to examine specific African human rights instruments and jurisprudence. Part III considers African traditional human rights conceptions. Part IV recommends a natural law foundation for African development. [excerpt]


The Role Of International Human Rights Law In Mediating Between The Rights Of Parents And Their Children Born With Intersex Traits In The United States, Cristian González Cabrera 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

The Role Of International Human Rights Law In Mediating Between The Rights Of Parents And Their Children Born With Intersex Traits In The United States, Cristian González Cabrera

William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law

No abstract provided.


Reimagining Justice For Gender-Based Crimes At The Margins: New Legal Strategies For Prosecuting Isis Crimes Against Women And Lgbtiq Persons, Lisa Davis 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Reimagining Justice For Gender-Based Crimes At The Margins: New Legal Strategies For Prosecuting Isis Crimes Against Women And Lgbtiq Persons, Lisa Davis

William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law

No abstract provided.


The Icc Policy Paper On Sexual And Gender-Based Crimes: A Crucial Step For International Criminal Law, Valerie Oosterveld 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

The Icc Policy Paper On Sexual And Gender-Based Crimes: A Crucial Step For International Criminal Law, Valerie Oosterveld

William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law

No abstract provided.


Gender Violence And Human Rights In An Era Of Backlash, Julie Goldscheid 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Gender Violence And Human Rights In An Era Of Backlash, Julie Goldscheid

William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law

This Article brings the lens of civil cases seeking accountability for gender violence to the question of how international human rights decisions interpret gender and gender norms. It argues that a broad interpretation of gender is particularly critical as we face increasing backlash globally. It demonstrates how international human rights decisions assessing state responses to gender violence recognize the role of historic gender biases and stereotypes in holding states to account for redressing discriminatory responses to abuse, and considers structural limitations in those instruments that could impede those instruments’ transformative reach.


Being Seen Like A State: How Americans (And Britons) Built The Constitutional Infrastructure Of A Developing Nation, Daniel J. Hulsebosch 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Being Seen Like A State: How Americans (And Britons) Built The Constitutional Infrastructure Of A Developing Nation, Daniel J. Hulsebosch

William & Mary Law Review

This Article develops the argument that the Federal Constitution of 1787 was conceptualized, drafted, and put into operation not only for American citizens but also for foreign audiences. In a world without supranational governing institutions, a constitution—at least, the Federal Constitution—might serve to promote peaceable international relations based on reciprocal trade and open credit. That at least was the Enlightenment-inflected hope.

Did it work? If early Americans engaged in constitution-making in large part to demonstrate their capacity for self-government, selfdiscipline, and commercial openness to foreign audiences, did anyone notice? Or was it all, regardless of diplomatic purposes and ...


The Climate For Human Rights, Rebecca M. Bratspies 2018 CUNY School of Law

The Climate For Human Rights, Rebecca M. Bratspies

University of Miami Law Review

Climate change is the defining challenge of the 21st century. The United States government is currently ignoring the problem, but wishful thinking alone will not keep global mean temperature rise below 2ºC. This Article proposes a way forward. It advises environmental decision-makers to use human rights norms to guide them as they make decisions under United States law. By reframing their discretion through a human rights lens, decision-makers can use their existing authority to respond to the super-wicked problem of climate change


Climate Change And Human Trafficking After The Paris Agreement, Michael B. Gerrard 2018 Columbia Law School

Climate Change And Human Trafficking After The Paris Agreement, Michael B. Gerrard

University of Miami Law Review

At least 21 million people globally are victims of human trafficking, typically involving either sexual exploitation or forced labor. This form of modern-day slavery tends to increase after natural disasters or conflicts where large numbers of people are displaced from their homes and become highly vulnerable. In the decades to come, climate change will very likely lead to a large increase in the number of people who are displaced and thus vulnerable to trafficking. The Paris Climate Agreement of 2015 established objectives to limit global temperature increases, but the voluntary pledges made by nearly every country fall far short of ...


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