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Puerto Rico And The Right Of Accession, Joseph Blocher, Mitu Gulati 2018 Duke Law School

Puerto Rico And The Right Of Accession, Joseph Blocher, Mitu Gulati

Faculty Scholarship

On June 11, 2017, Puerto Rico held a referendum on its legal status. Although turnout was low, 97% of ballots favored statehood, rather than independence or the status quo. The federal government, however, has financial and political reasons to resist this preference: Puerto Rico would bring with it a massive, unpayable debt, and the potential to swing the current balance of power in Congress.

The tension between Puerto Rico’s possible desire to pull closer to the mainland and Congress’s presumptive desire to hold it at arm’s length raises at least two important legal questions. Could Congress expel ...


Gerrymandering And Conceit: The Supreme Court's Conflict With Itself, McKay Cunningham 2018 Concordia University School of Law

Gerrymandering And Conceit: The Supreme Court's Conflict With Itself, Mckay Cunningham

Faculty Scholarship

In November 2016, a federal court struck as unconstitutional Wisconsin’s redistricting map under both the First Amendment and the Equal Protection Clause. The court’s decision in Whitford v. Gill marks the first time a federal court invalidated a redistricting map as unconstitutional for partisan gerrymandering in over thirty years. Wisconsin has appealed the decision to the United States Supreme Court, which recently granted review. The Supreme Court has long held that extreme partisan gerrymandering violates equal protection but has simultaneously refused to determine the merits of gerrymandering disputes, instead labeling them as non-justiciable political questions. In particular, the ...


Sustaining Collective Self-Governance And Collective Action: A Constitutional Role Morality For Presidents And Members Of Congress, Neil S. Siegel 2018 Duke Law School

Sustaining Collective Self-Governance And Collective Action: A Constitutional Role Morality For Presidents And Members Of Congress, Neil S. Siegel

Faculty Scholarship

In the United States today, the behavior of the political branches is generally viewed as more damaging to the American constitutional system than is the behavior of the federal courts. Yet constitutional law scholarship continues to focus primarily on judges and judging. This Article suggests that such scholarship should develop for presidents and members of Congress what it has long advocated for judges: a role morality that imposes normative limits on the exercise of official discretion over and above strictly legal limits. The Article first grounds a role morality for federal elected officials in two purposes of the U.S ...


Constitutions And Bills Of Rights: Invigorating Or Placating Democracy?, Brian Christopher Jones 2017 University of Dundee

Constitutions And Bills Of Rights: Invigorating Or Placating Democracy?, Brian Christopher Jones

Brian Christopher Jones

Champions of constitutions and bills of rights regularly portray them as possessing significant, sometimes mysterious, powers. One characterisation is that newly implemented constitutions may invigorate a democracy, particularly at the ballot box. This article challenges that notion. In particular, it examines a number of jurisdictions that have recently implemented constitutions and bill of rights, finding that in many of them, voter turnout decreased after passage, sometimes significantly. As the argument for a codified British constitution endures, the findings of this paper provide provisional evidence that those advocating for such a device should be wary of touting its potentially invigorating democratic ...


Temporary Legislation's Finest Hour?: Towards A Proper Model Of Temporary Legislation In Israel שעתן היפה של הוראות השעה?: לקראת מודל ראוי של חקיקה זמנית בישראל, Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov 2017 Bar-Ilan University

Temporary Legislation's Finest Hour?: Towards A Proper Model Of Temporary Legislation In Israel שעתן היפה של הוראות השעה?: לקראת מודל ראוי של חקיקה זמנית בישראל, Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov

Dr. Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov

This article discusses a major trend in Israeli legislation in recent years: the rise of temporary legislation in Israel. The first part of the article presents a first-of-its-kind empirical study that reveals that the Knesset is increasingly using temporary legislation, which is referred to in Israel as "temporary provisions." Against this background, the main purpose of the article is normative: to propose a model for proper use of temporary legislation in Israel. After reviewing the normative debate for and against temporary legislation, the article focuses on two central questions: When is it appropriate to make use of temporary legislation; and ...


A Necessary Decision Or An Unjustified "Major Deviation" From The Case Law?: Commentary On Hcj 10042/16 Quantinsky V. The Israeli Knesset In The Matter Of The Third Apartment Tax ?החלטה מתבקשת או "סטיה רבתי" בלתי מוצדקת מההלכה הפסוקה הערת פסיקה על בג"ץ 10042/16 קוונטינסקי נ' כנסת ישראל בעניין מס דירה שלישית, Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov 2017 Bar-Ilan University

A Necessary Decision Or An Unjustified "Major Deviation" From The Case Law?: Commentary On Hcj 10042/16 Quantinsky V. The Israeli Knesset In The Matter Of The Third Apartment Tax ?החלטה מתבקשת או "סטיה רבתי" בלתי מוצדקת מההלכה הפסוקה הערת פסיקה על בג"ץ 10042/16 קוונטינסקי נ' כנסת ישראל בעניין מס דירה שלישית, Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov

Dr. Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov

This article analyzes the judgment of the Supreme Court of Israel in HCJ 10042/16 Quantinsky v. the Israeli Knesset, which invalidated the “Third Apartment Tax” provisions in the Arrangements Law. This is one of the most important judgments in the field of judicial review of the legislative process and the first case that invalidated a law due to defects in its legislative process. The article argues that the judgment is characterized by a considerable gap between the positions of the Justices in the majority to the dissent opinion in characterizing the judgment and its relationship to the Poultry Growers ...


Reasoning Through Clashes Between Religion And Equality: Case Law, Skeptics, And Social Coherence, Michael A. Helfand 2017 Pepperdine University

Reasoning Through Clashes Between Religion And Equality: Case Law, Skeptics, And Social Coherence, Michael A. Helfand

Michael A Helfand

A review of Nelson Tebbe's new book, Religious Freedom in An Egalitarian Age (Harvard University Press, 2017). Forthcoming 2018.


When Judges Are Theologians: Adjudicating Religious Questions, Michael A. Helfand 2017 Pepperdine University

When Judges Are Theologians: Adjudicating Religious Questions, Michael A. Helfand

Michael A Helfand

In this chapter, I explore how judges—and, more generally, U.S. courts—deal with legal disputes when they must consider not only laws and facts, but also religion, or maybe even more precisely, theology. Indeed, in a wide range of circumstances, judges are confronted with cases where the outcome in some way or another requires them to issue a decision that is predicated, to varying to degrees, on a theological question upon which there is some debate. While in American law the ostensibly simple answer to this question is simply that the Constitution prohibits courts from adjudicating religious questions ...


Helfand_Implied Consent.Pdf, Michael A. Helfand 2017 Pepperdine University

Helfand_Implied Consent.Pdf, Michael A. Helfand

Michael A Helfand

One of the recent fault lines over religious liberty is the scope of protections afforded institutions and corporations that have religiously-motivated leadership. Courts and scholars all seem to agree that such religious institutions deserve some degree of protection. But the remains significant debate over the principles that should guide judicial decisions addressing in what circumstances religiously-motivated institutions should—and in what circumstances they should not—receive the law’s protection.

In this chapter, I argue for an “implied consent” framework to address religious institutional claims. Such a framework grounds the authority of religious institutions not in a degree of inherent ...


Fourth Amendment Anxiety, Stephen E. Henderson, Kiel Brennan-Marquez 2017 New York University

Fourth Amendment Anxiety, Stephen E. Henderson, Kiel Brennan-Marquez

Stephen E Henderson

In Birchfield v. North Dakota (2016), the Supreme Court broke new Fourth Amendment ground by establishing that law enforcement’s collection of information can be cause for “anxiety,” meriting constitutional protection, even if subsequent uses of the information are tightly restricted.  This change is significant.  While the Court has long recognized the reality that police cannot always be trusted to follow constitutional rules, Birchfield changes how that concern is implemented in Fourth Amendment law, and importantly, in a manner that acknowledges the new realities of data-driven policing.
 
Beyond offering a careful reading of Birchfield, this Article has two goals.  First ...


Carpenter V. United States And The Fourth Amendment: The Best Way Forward, Stephen E. Henderson 2017 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Carpenter V. United States And The Fourth Amendment: The Best Way Forward, Stephen E. Henderson

Stephen E Henderson

We finally have a federal ‘test case.’  In Carpenter v. United States, the Supreme Court is poised to set the direction of the Fourth Amendment in the digital age.  The case squarely presents how the twentieth-century third party doctrine will fare in contemporary times, and the stakes could not be higher.  This Article reviews the Carpenter case and how it fits within the greater discussion of the Fourth Amendment third party doctrine and location surveillance, and I express a hope that the Court will be both a bit ambitious and a good measure cautious. 
 
As for ambition, the Court must ...


Derechos Sociales Y Políticas Públicas. El Principio De Progresividad, Rodrigo A. Poyanco Bugueño 2017 Universidad de Los Andes - Chile

Derechos Sociales Y Políticas Públicas. El Principio De Progresividad, Rodrigo A. Poyanco Bugueño

Rodrigo A. Poyanco Bugueño

Social rights involve a public policy component whose determination is outside the jurisdiction of constitutional judges. Therefore, attempts to directly adjudicate the social rights contained in constitutions encourage judges to engage in activism, evaluating elements that do not really correspond to legal interpretation, in a strict sense of the term. In order to demonstrate this assertion, this article will study some decisions of the constitutional and superior courts of Brazil, Colombia, Peru and Chile, as well as the Inter-American Court, which apply the so-called principle of progressivity in the fulfillment of social rights.


Formal And Informal Constitutional Amendment Of The United States Constitution, Richard S. Kay 2017 Selected Works

Formal And Informal Constitutional Amendment Of The United States Constitution, Richard S. Kay

Richard Kay

This is the United States report submitted for the session on Formal and Informal Constitutional Amendment at the Twentieth Congress of the International Academy of Comparative Law to be held in Fukuoka, Japan in July, 2018. The report reviews the rules of Article V of the United States Constitution that sets out the rules for constitutional amendment and it provides a brief chronology of the twenty-eight amendments adopted to date. It notes a number of potential problems of interpretation associated with Article V. The report considers the widely held assumption that the United States Constitution is one of the hardest ...


Ohio's Modern Courts Amendment Must Be Amended: Why And How, Richard S. Walinski, Mark D. Wagoner Jr. 2017 Thacker Robinson Zinz LPA

Ohio's Modern Courts Amendment Must Be Amended: Why And How, Richard S. Walinski, Mark D. Wagoner Jr.

Cleveland State Law Review

A 1968 amendment to the Ohio Constitution granted the Supreme Court of Ohio the authority to promulgate “rules governing practice and procedure” for Ohio courts. The amendment also provided that “[a]ll laws in conflict with such rules shall be of no further force or effect after such rules have taken effect” and that no rule may “abridge, enlarge, or modify any substantive right.”

Although the amendment was explicit about automatic repeal of existing laws, it says nothing about whether the General Assembly may legislate on a procedural matter after a court rule takes effect. That silence has caused enduring ...


Stuck In Ohio's Legal Limbo, How Many Mistrials Are Too Many Mistrials?: Exploring New Factors That Help A Trial Judge In Ohio Know Whether To Exercise Her Authority To Dismiss An Indictment With Prejudice, Especially Following Repeated Hung Juries, Samantha M. Cira 2017 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Stuck In Ohio's Legal Limbo, How Many Mistrials Are Too Many Mistrials?: Exploring New Factors That Help A Trial Judge In Ohio Know Whether To Exercise Her Authority To Dismiss An Indictment With Prejudice, Especially Following Repeated Hung Juries, Samantha M. Cira

Cleveland State Law Review

Multiple mistrials following validly-prosecuted trials are becoming an increasingly harsh reality in today’s criminal justice system. Currently, the Ohio Supreme Court has not provided any guidelines to help its trial judges know when to make the crucial decision to dismiss an indictment with prejudice following a string of properly-declared mistrials, especially due to repeated hung juries. Despite multiple mistrials that continue to result in no conviction, criminal defendants often languish behind bars, suffering detrimental psychological harm and a loss of personal freedom as they remain in “legal limbo” waiting to retry their case. Furthermore, continuously retrying defendants cuts against ...


What Congress's Repeal Efforts Can Teach Us About Regulatory Reform, Cary Coglianese, Gabriel Scheffler 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

What Congress's Repeal Efforts Can Teach Us About Regulatory Reform, Cary Coglianese, Gabriel Scheffler

Faculty Scholarship

Major legislative actions during the early part of the 115th Congress have undermined the central argument for regulatory reform measures such as the REINS Act, a bill that would require congressional approval of all new major regulations. Proponents of the REINS Act argue that it would make the federal regulatory system more democratic by shifting responsibility for regulatory decisions away from unelected bureaucrats and toward the people’s representatives in Congress. But separate legislative actions in the opening of the 115th Congress only call this argument into question. Congress’s most significant initiatives during this period — its derailed attempts to ...


Eureka County V. Seventh Judicial Dist. Ct., 133 Nev. Adv. Op. 111 (Dec. 28, 2017), Michelle Harnik 2017 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Eureka County V. Seventh Judicial Dist. Ct., 133 Nev. Adv. Op. 111 (Dec. 28, 2017), Michelle Harnik

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court determined that due process requires junior water rights holders be given notice and an opportunity to be heard in the district court’s consideration of a senior water rights holder’s request to curtail the junior’s water rights.


The Jewish Family – Between Family Law And Contract Law, yehezkel Margalit 2017 Netanya Academic College

The Jewish Family – Between Family Law And Contract Law, Yehezkel Margalit

Hezi Margalit

Traditional Jewish family law has persevered for hundreds of years and rules covering marriage, the raising of children, and divorce are well established; yet pressures from modern society are causing long held views to be re-examined. The Jewish Family: Between Family Law and Contract Law examines the tenets of Jewish family law in the light of new attitudes concerning the role of women, assisted reproduction technologies, and prenuptial agreements. It explores, through interdisciplinary research combining the legal aspects of family law and contract law, how the Jewish family can cope with both old and modern obstacles and challenges. Focusing on ...


Franchise Tax Board Of California V. Hyatt, 133 Nev. Adv. Op. 102 (Dec. 26, 2017), Rebecca L. Crooker 2017 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Franchise Tax Board Of California V. Hyatt, 133 Nev. Adv. Op. 102 (Dec. 26, 2017), Rebecca L. Crooker

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court determined that discretionary-function immunity does not apply to intentional tort and bad faith claims. Under comity principles, the Franchise Tax Board was entitled to the $50,000 statutory cap that would extend to Nevada businesses under NRS 41.035(1). The Court additionally recognized false light invasion of privacy as a tort cause of action distinct from other privacy torts, and adopted the Restatement’s sliding-scale approach in determining the amount of evidence necessary to establish a claim for intentional infliction of emotional distress.


Constitutional Barriers To Congressional Reform, John M. Greabe 2017 University of New Hampshire School of Law

Constitutional Barriers To Congressional Reform, John M. Greabe

Law Faculty Scholarship

Americans celebrate our Constitution as a beacon that can guide us through difficult situations. And justly so. But at times, the Constitution also has stood as a barrier to necessary reform.


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