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Formalism, Ferguson, And The Future Of Qualified Immunity, Fred O. Smith Jr. 2018 Emory Law School

Formalism, Ferguson, And The Future Of Qualified Immunity, Fred O. Smith Jr.

Notre Dame Law Review

This Essay explores whether formalism and accountability are compatible lodestars as we steer toward a new future for qualified immunity. Ultimately, I argue that two existing proposals would bring the doctrine closer to its text and history, mitigate against fragmentation in the law of constitutional torts, and narrow the rights-remedies gap when government officials violate the Constitution. One proposal, by John Jeffries, would create a fault-based system, where government officials and entities alike would be liable for constitutional violations that are both unreasonable and unconstitutional. Another proposal would render governmental employers’ liable for the acts of their agents.


Second Thoughts About Stun Guns, Rene Reyes 2018 Suffolk University Law School

Second Thoughts About Stun Guns, Rene Reyes

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”) recently declared that the Commonwealth’s statutory ban on stun guns violates the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The SJC had previously upheld the statute against constitutional challenge in Commonwealth v. Caetano, but the reasoning behind this holding was rejected in a brief per curium opinion by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2016. However, the guidance given by the Supreme Court in the Caetano litigation was far from unambiguous: it faulted the SJC’s reasoning without opining on the ultimate question of the ban’s constitutionality, thus leaving open the possibility ...


Anthony Kennedy: A Most Principled Justice, Mitchell N. Berman, David Peters 2018 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Anthony Kennedy: A Most Principled Justice, Mitchell N. Berman, David Peters

Faculty Scholarship

After three decades on the Court, Justice Anthony Kennedy remains its most widely maligned member. Concentrating on his constitutional jurisprudence, critics from across the ideological spectrum have derided Justice Kennedy as “a self-aggrandizing turncoat,” “an unprincipled weathervane,” and, succinctly, “America’s worst Justice.” We believe that Kennedy is not as bereft of a constitutional theory as common wisdom maintains. To the contrary, this Article argues, his constitutional decisionmaking reflects a genuine grasp (less than perfect, more than rudimentary) of a coherent and, we think, compelling theory of constitutional law—the account, more or less, that one of has introduced in ...


Abortion Rights And The Kavanaugh Nomination, John M. Greabe 2018 UNH Law School

Abortion Rights And The Kavanaugh Nomination, John M. Greabe

Law Faculty Scholarship

[Excerpt] "Last week, President Trump nominated federal appeals court judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court seat opened by the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. Immediately, coverage of the nomination focused on abortion and whether Judge Kavanaugh's confirmation would spell the end of the constitutional right recognized in Roe v. Wade. Let's explore why."


A Nation Of Informants: Reining In Post-9/11 Coercion Of Intelligence Informants, Diala Shamas 2018 Brooklyn Law School

A Nation Of Informants: Reining In Post-9/11 Coercion Of Intelligence Informants, Diala Shamas

Brooklyn Law Review

This article challenges the adequacy of the existing legal and regulatory framework governing informant recruitment and coercion practices to protect fundamental rights, informed by the Muslim-American experience. It looks at the growing law enforcement practice of recruiting informants among Muslim-American communities for intelligence gathering purposes. Although the coercion of law-abiding individuals to provide information to federal law enforcement agencies for intelligence gathering purposes implicates significant rights, it is left unregulated. Existing, albeit limited, restraints on the government agents’ ability to coerce individuals to provide information either assume a criminal context, or are driven by historical concerns over FBI corruption. As ...


Demanding Due Process: Time To Amend 8 U.S.C. § 1226(C) And Limit Indefinite Detention Of Criminal Immigrants, Allison M. Cunneen 2018 Brooklyn Law School

Demanding Due Process: Time To Amend 8 U.S.C. § 1226(C) And Limit Indefinite Detention Of Criminal Immigrants, Allison M. Cunneen

Brooklyn Law Review

Under 8 U.S.C. § 1226(c), Congress mandates that the Attorney General detain criminal immigrants upon release from prison. The statute neither provides a temporal limitation to detention nor does it afford a criminal immigrant periodic bond hearings to determine whether he or she is a flight risk or danger to the community. Thus, until an immigration judge decides whether a criminal immigrant should be removed from the United States, that person remains detained. With the unprecedent backlog in immigration courts, criminal immigrants are waiting longer for a removal hearing, which means longer time spent in detention with no ...


Taking Away The Tightrope: Fixing The National Flood Insurance Program Circus Via Eminent Domain, Alexander S. Mendelson 2018 Brooklyn Law School

Taking Away The Tightrope: Fixing The National Flood Insurance Program Circus Via Eminent Domain, Alexander S. Mendelson

Brooklyn Law Review

As Harvey, Irma, Maria and other major 2017 storms washed upon the shores of the United States, millions of people across the nation in major cities and rural areas alike found their possessions, their homes, and sadly in many cases their lives, washed away with the storms. The destructive hurricane season came just as Congress began to consider the reauthorization of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), a federal system of subsidized flood insurance created to fill a void left by private insurers in the 1960s. Extreme weather events such as these illustrate the need for such a program and ...


50 Years Later—The State Of Civil Rights And Opportunity In America, Catherine E. Lhamon 2018 University of Minnesota Law School

50 Years Later—The State Of Civil Rights And Opportunity In America, Catherine E. Lhamon

Law & Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice

Abridged Transcript, The Summit for Civil Rights, November 9, 2017


A Conversation On Learning From The History Of The Civil Rights Movement, Walter F. Mondale 2018 University of Minnesota Law School

A Conversation On Learning From The History Of The Civil Rights Movement, Walter F. Mondale

Law & Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice

Introduction & Abridged Transcript, The Summit for Civil Rights, November 10, 2017


Litigating Federal Habeas Corpus Cases: One Equitable Gateway At A Time, Eve Brensike Primus 2018 University of Michigan Law School

Litigating Federal Habeas Corpus Cases: One Equitable Gateway At A Time, Eve Brensike Primus

Other Publications

Habeas corpus, also known as the Great Writ, was meant to be a “bulwark against convictions that violate fundamental fairness,” according to the Supreme Court. Yet today, federal courts provide relief in fewer than half of one percent of cases in which a non-capital state prisoner seeks relief through habeas. The Great Writ, it would seem, is no longer so great. In Litigating Federal Habeas Corpus Cases: One Equitable Gateway at a Time, Eve Brensike Primus examines the various procedural and substantive hurdles that have been erected in the past half century that make it nearly impossible for state prisoners ...


Dignity And Second Amendment Enforcement—Response To William D. Araiza’S, Arming The Second Amendment And Enforcing The Fourteenth, Darrell A. H. Miller 2018 Duke Law School

Dignity And Second Amendment Enforcement—Response To William D. Araiza’S, Arming The Second Amendment And Enforcing The Fourteenth, Darrell A. H. Miller

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

William Araiza’s insightful article, Arming the Second Amendment, has one essential, hidden component: dignity. Dignity helps explain the peculiar hydraulics of Congress’s power to enforce section five of the Fourteenth Amendment—a jurisprudence in which the less scrutiny the Court itself applies to a given class or right, the more scrutiny it applies to congressional efforts to protect that same class or right. Dignity helps explain the Court’s halting approach to Reconstruction Amendment enforcement power more generally – an approach in which constitutional versus unconstitutional legislation turns on seemingly insignificant regulatory distinctions. And dignity’s role in § 5 ...


Florida’S Constitution Revision Commission [Crc]: Behind-The-Scenes Insights From Bob Butterworth, Florida’S Former Attorney General And Member Of The 1998 Crc, Alvan Balent Jr. 2018 University of Miami Law School

Florida’S Constitution Revision Commission [Crc]: Behind-The-Scenes Insights From Bob Butterworth, Florida’S Former Attorney General And Member Of The 1998 Crc, Alvan Balent Jr.

University of Miami Law Review

Once every twenty years, the Florida Constitution mandates the convening of a thirty-seven-member body that is charged with reviewing the state constitution and submitting any recommended changes to the general public for approval. This entity is formally known as the Constitution Revision Commission, and between March 2017 and May 2018, it met for the third time in Florida’s history. Eight amendments, some with multiple parts, were proposed, and if any of these proposals are approved by 60% of the voters in the November 2018 general election, they will become “the supreme law of the land” for the State of ...


Reassigning Cases On Remand In The Interests Of Justice, For The Enforcement Of Appellate Decisions, And For Other Reasons That Remain Unclear, Jonathan D. Colan 2018 University of Miami Law School

Reassigning Cases On Remand In The Interests Of Justice, For The Enforcement Of Appellate Decisions, And For Other Reasons That Remain Unclear, Jonathan D. Colan

University of Miami Law Review

Federal appellate courts have the authority to order reassignment of cases to different district judges as part of their supervisory authority over the district courts within their circuits. This Article examines the categories of cases in which the Eleventh Circuit has ordered reassignment to different district court judges on remand and explains the rationale underlying reassignment in each category. The more understandable cases address both the appearance and the presence of bias or impropriety by the original trial judge. This Article describes the general principles underlying the Eleventh Circuit’s reassignment practices and then questions why reassignment is necessary in ...


Habeas Won And Lost: The Eleventh Circuit’S Narrow View Of State Court Judgments, Christina M. Frohock 2018 University of Miami School of Law

Habeas Won And Lost: The Eleventh Circuit’S Narrow View Of State Court Judgments, Christina M. Frohock

University of Miami Law Review

The Eleventh Circuit vacated its panel opinion in Patterson v. Secretary and reheard the case en banc. The court’s new opinion revisits the prohibition against “second or successive” habeas corpus petitions in 28 U.S.C. § 2244(b) and embraces the dissenting view in the prior opinion, rejecting the reasoning of the majority. A new state court judgment resets the habeas clock, allowing a prisoner to file an additional federal habeas petition without running afoul of section 2244(b). Previously, the court offered an expansive view of such judgments, looking to whether the state court has substantively changed the ...


Compelled Commercial Disclosures: Zauderer’S Application To Non-Misleading Commercial Speech, Alexis Mason 2018 University of Miami Law School

Compelled Commercial Disclosures: Zauderer’S Application To Non-Misleading Commercial Speech, Alexis Mason

University of Miami Law Review

In 1980, the Supreme Court held that a prohibition on commercial speech is subject to intermediate scrutiny. Roughly five years later, in Zauderer, the Court provided guidance on specific instances in which the government may compel commercial speech. The Court held that a requirement that goods or services disclose “factual and uncontroversial” information is constitutional so long as the requirement is not unduly burdensome, and the requirement is “reasonably related to the State’s interest in preventing deception of consumers.” This holding applied a rational basis standard of review to compelled commercial speech aimed at curing deception of consumers.

Despite ...


A Touchy Subject: The Eleventh Circuit’S Tug-Of-War Over What Constitutes Violent “Physical Force”, Conrad Kahn, Danli Song 2018 University of Miami Law School

A Touchy Subject: The Eleventh Circuit’S Tug-Of-War Over What Constitutes Violent “Physical Force”, Conrad Kahn, Danli Song

University of Miami Law Review

No abstract provided.


How Courts Analyze Voter Identification Laws Under The First Amendment, Joby Len Richard 2018 Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

How Courts Analyze Voter Identification Laws Under The First Amendment, Joby Len Richard

LSU Master's Theses

Some scholarship and political experts describe voter ID laws as a form of voter suppression because they make it harder for certain groups of people to vote. First, this thesis considers the historical backdrop of voter discrimination resulting in the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and subsequent state uses of registration and voter ID laws. Then, this study reviews the theoretical foundation of freedom of expression as developed by Thomas Emerson and individual and social free expression values, including the social value of self-governance explicated by Alexander Meiklejohn. Some scholars also suggest that voter ID laws may ...


Personal Jurisdiction Over Orb-Web Corporations: A Re-Routed Approach For "Change In The Navigation Of Time", Vidhya Iyer 2018 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Personal Jurisdiction Over Orb-Web Corporations: A Re-Routed Approach For "Change In The Navigation Of Time", Vidhya Iyer

The Global Business Law Review

The law of personal jurisdiction lies at the heart of all litigation. Our courts must recognize the rights of individuals as well as the rights of corporations. The motto placed at the entrance of the United States Supreme Court—"Equal Justice Under Law"—ensures the promise of equal justice under the law to all persons. It expresses the ultimate responsibility of the Supreme Court of the United States (the "Court") as the highest tribunal for all cases and controversies arising under the Constitution, laws, and treaties of the United States and functions as a guardian and interpreter of the Constitution ...


Righting A Wrong: Woodrow Wilson, Warren G. Harding, And The Espionage Act Prosecutions, David Forte 2018 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Cleveland State University

Righting A Wrong: Woodrow Wilson, Warren G. Harding, And The Espionage Act Prosecutions, David Forte

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This is a story of excess and reparation. It is a chronicle of one President from the elite intellectual classes of the East, and another from a county seat in the heartland. Woodrow Wilson was the college president whose contribution to the art of government lay in the principle of expertise and efficiency. When he went to war, he turned the machinery of government into a comprehensive and highly effective instrument for victory. For Wilson, it followed that there could be little tolerance for those who impeded the success of American arms by their anti-war propaganda, draft resistance, or ideological ...


Rwu First Amendment Blog: Michael J. Yelnosky's Blog: Janus V. Afscme And "Weaponizing The First Amendment 06-30-2018, Michael J. Yelnosky 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Rwu First Amendment Blog: Michael J. Yelnosky's Blog: Janus V. Afscme And "Weaponizing The First Amendment 06-30-2018, Michael J. Yelnosky

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


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