Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Commercial Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

5,120 Full-Text Articles 3,314 Authors 2,275,765 Downloads 119 Institutions

All Articles in Commercial Law

Faceted Search

5,120 full-text articles. Page 3 of 95.

Marijuana Agriculture Law: Regulation At The Root Of An Industry, Ryan Stoa 2018 Concordia Univeristy School of Law

Marijuana Agriculture Law: Regulation At The Root Of An Industry, Ryan Stoa

Ryan B. Stoa

Marijuana legalization is sweeping the nation. Recreational marijuana use is legal in eight states. Medical marijuana use is legal in thirteen states. Only three states maintain an absolute criminal prohibition on marijuana use. Many of these legalization initiatives propose to regulate marijuana in a manner similar to alcohol, and many titles are variations of the "Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act." For political and public health reasons the analogy makes sense, but it also reveals a regulatory blind spot. States may be using alcohol as a model for regulating the distribution, retail, and consumption of marijuana, but marijuana is much more ...


Rise Of The Machines: The Legal Implications For Investor Protection With The Rise Of Robo-Advisors, Bret E. Strzelczyk 2018 DePaul University College of Law

Rise Of The Machines: The Legal Implications For Investor Protection With The Rise Of Robo-Advisors, Bret E. Strzelczyk

DePaul Business and Commercial Law Journal

This note examines the complex state of financial innovation and preexisting investor protection regimes, mainly the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, which do not properly address the question of whether a robo-advisor platform serving as registered investment advisers satisfies the fiduciary standard elements laid out in the Act. This article examines the current regulation from the Department of Labor, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, and the Securities and Exchange Commission and addresses the inadequacies in each regulatory entity’s policy prescription. This article contends that robo-advisors can not act as a fiduciary for several reasons – primarily because these platforms do ...


Consumers In Shock: How Federal Government Overregulation Led Mylan To Acquire A Monopoly Over Epinephrine Autoinjectors, Nicole O'Toole 2018 DePaul University College of Law

Consumers In Shock: How Federal Government Overregulation Led Mylan To Acquire A Monopoly Over Epinephrine Autoinjectors, Nicole O'Toole

DePaul Business and Commercial Law Journal

The philosophy that federal government intervention increases costs and decreases options and values available to consumers can be analyzed across a plethora of markets. This Note will focus on the epinephrine autoinjector market, specifically looking at Mylan's epinephrine autoinjector known as the EpiPen. Today, the EpiPen is considered the “Kleenex” of epinephrine autoinjectors as it is estimated to control over ninety percent of the market share. From a Darwinist perspective it would appear that because the EpiPen controls most of the market, it must be the most superior product available to consumers. However, as this note will cover, this ...


Over- And Under-Funding: Crowdfunding Concerns Of The Parties Involved, Tanya M. Marcum J.D., Eden S. Blair PhD 2018 Bradley University

Over- And Under-Funding: Crowdfunding Concerns Of The Parties Involved, Tanya M. Marcum J.D., Eden S. Blair Phd

DePaul Business and Commercial Law Journal

Financial collaboration for new business ventures or the expansion of existing businesses utilizing the internet and social media is expanding. One area of growth is in the area of crowdfunding. Crowdfunding or crowdsourcing is known as collaborative funding using the internet to attract many investors to a new business venture.


Regulating In Uncertainty: Animating The Public Health Product Safety Net To Capture Consumer Products Regulated By The Fda That Use Innovative Technologies, Including Nanotechnologies, Genetic Modification, Cloning, And Lab Grown Meat, Katharine A. Van Tassel 2018 Concordia University School of Law, Boise

Regulating In Uncertainty: Animating The Public Health Product Safety Net To Capture Consumer Products Regulated By The Fda That Use Innovative Technologies, Including Nanotechnologies, Genetic Modification, Cloning, And Lab Grown Meat, Katharine A. Van Tassel

Katharine Van Tassel

This Article will use nanotechnology as an example that highlights how regulation based on novelty rather than hazard achieves the proper balance between protecting public health while encouraging innovation through the animation of the public health product safety net. In Part II, this Article starts by explaining what nanotechnology is and the remarkable growth of its use in everyday consumer products. It then summarizes the steadily increasing number of studies that suggest that there are likely to be serious health risks associated with the use of nanotech consumer products. Next, it explains how the FDA [Food and Drug Administration] is ...


'A Body Of Sound Practical Common Sense': Law Reform Through Lay Judges, Public Choice Theory, And The Transformation Of American Law, Gregory S. Sergienko 2018 Concordia University School of Law

'A Body Of Sound Practical Common Sense': Law Reform Through Lay Judges, Public Choice Theory, And The Transformation Of American Law, Gregory S. Sergienko

Greg Sergienko

... [T]hree of the earliest and most influential proponents of the argument that public choice theory implies that courts produce better rules than legislators are Judge Frank Easterbrook, Judge Richard Posner, and Justice Antonin Scalia. These proponents of social choice theory conclude from this that judicial decisions are more to be trusted than legislative decisions and therefore favor a variety of devices to expand judicial power. These include interpreting statutes restrictively, which leaves the decision up to the pre-existing judge-made law; interpreting statutes in a common-law fashion, which allows judges their traditional rule-making powers; and ignoring legislative intent, which leaves ...


Full Faith And Credit, Choice Of Laws, And Extraterritorial Regulation Of Corporate Transactions, Gregory S. Sergienko 2018 Concordia University School of Law

Full Faith And Credit, Choice Of Laws, And Extraterritorial Regulation Of Corporate Transactions, Gregory S. Sergienko

Greg Sergienko

In a federal system in which each state may enact laws providing for the chartering and governance of corporations and in which corporations can and do conduct business in more than one state, several states may claim an interest in regulating the conduct of a given corporation. The enactment of state laws that are intended to restrict hostile corporate takeovers and that purport to extend to foreign corporations is one example of this phenomenon. "Typically, any of a number of jurisdictional links might trigger the application of such an anti-takeover statute: the target's being incorporated in the state, its ...


How Irrational Actors In The Ceo Suite Affect Corporate Governance, Renee M. Jones 2018 Boston College Law School

How Irrational Actors In The Ceo Suite Affect Corporate Governance, Renee M. Jones

Renee Jones

No abstract provided.


Aproximación A Los Mecanismos Para Completar El Contrato Desde La Teoría Económica. El Caso De La Cadena Alimentaria, Teresa Rodríguez-Cachón 2018 ALACDE

Aproximación A Los Mecanismos Para Completar El Contrato Desde La Teoría Económica. El Caso De La Cadena Alimentaria, Teresa Rodríguez-Cachón

The Latin American and Iberian Journal of Law and Economics

The economic theory of the contract has put into the firing line of legal debate the relevance of taking into account the incomplete nature of this legal instrument, coming from the bounded rationality of human beings and from the existence of transaction costs. From this point of view, it is necessary to study legal system mechanisms to correct this problem. These mechanisms, apart from being particularly relevant in long-term contractual relations, differ according to the nature of each relation. Among all, special attention is focused on default rules as a mechanism to fill in contracts and their application to the ...


Manufactured Deadlocks? The Problematic “Bad Faith Defense” To Forced-Sales Of Delaware Corporations Under Section 226 Of The Delaware General Corporation Law, Brian C. Durkin 2018 Boston College Law School

Manufactured Deadlocks? The Problematic “Bad Faith Defense” To Forced-Sales Of Delaware Corporations Under Section 226 Of The Delaware General Corporation Law, Brian C. Durkin

Boston College Law Review

Title 8, Section 226 of the Delaware General Corporation Law authorizes courts to force the sale of Delaware corporations when the stockholders or directors are in a state of complete deadlock. Some courts have tentatively acknowledged that a party may successfully oppose the sale by arguing that the stockholder bringing a Section 226 action has done so in bad faith by manufacturing a deadlock in the hopes of obtaining a court-ordered sale (i.e., the “bad faith defense”). This Note explores the idea of the manufactured deadlock in Section 226 actions, through the lens of Shawe v. Elting, a recent ...


Not So Good: The Classification Of “Smart Goods” Under Ucc Article 2, Chadwick L. Williams 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Not So Good: The Classification Of “Smart Goods” Under Ucc Article 2, Chadwick L. Williams

Georgia State University Law Review

Refrigerators can now tweet. Today, almost sixty years after the states widely adopted the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), the line between goods and services is more blurred than ever. When the UCC was drafted, a good was the simple opposite of a service. A good was something “movable” and tangible, and a service was not. Article 2 of the UCC, which governs sales, limits its scope to goods.

However, because Article 2 was drafted long before the proliferation of so-called “smart goods,” courts continuously struggle to determine when a smart good falls within Article 2’s scope. Courts have developed ...


Contract Law And The Common Good, Brian H. Bix 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Contract Law And The Common Good, Brian H. Bix

William & Mary Business Law Review

In The Dignity of Commerce, Nathan Oman offers a theory of contract law that is largely descriptive, but also strongly normative. His theory presents contract law’s purpose as supporting robust markets. This Article compares and contrasts Oman’s argument about the proper understanding of contract law with one presented over eighty years earlier by Morris Cohen. Oman’s focus is on the connection between Contract Law and markets; Cohen’s connection had been between Contract Law and the public interest. Oman’s work brings back Cohen’s basic insight, and gives it a more concrete form, as a formidable ...


Markets And Morals: The Limits Of Doux Commerce, Mark L. Movsesian 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Markets And Morals: The Limits Of Doux Commerce, Mark L. Movsesian

William & Mary Business Law Review

In this Essay on Professor Oman’s beautifully written and meticulously researched book, The Dignity of Commerce, I do three things. First, I describe what I take to be the central message of the book, namely, that markets promote liberal values of tolerance, pluralism, and cooperation among rival, even hostile groups. Second, I show how Oman’s argument draws from a line of political and economic thought that dates to the Enlightenment, the so-called doux commerce thesis of thinkers like Montesquieu and Adam Smith. Finally, I discuss what I consider the most penetrating criticism of that thesis, Edmund Burke’s ...


Contract, Promise, And The Right Of Redress, Andrew S. Gold 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Contract, Promise, And The Right Of Redress, Andrew S. Gold

William & Mary Business Law Review

This Essay reviews Nathan Oman’s recent book, The Dignity of Commerce. The book is compelling, and it makes an important and original contribution to contract theory—a contribution that insightfully shows how markets matter. Yet, in the course of developing a market-centered justification for contract law, The Dignity of Commerce also downplays the significance of consent and promissory morality. In both cases, the book’s argument is problematic, but this Essay will address questions of promissory morality. Oman contends that promise-based accounts struggle with contract law’s bilateralism and with its private standing doctrine. Yet, promissory morality is a ...


Make Up For Lost Time And Money: Using The Lanham Act To Regulate The Cosmetic Industry, Maria Monastra 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Make Up For Lost Time And Money: Using The Lanham Act To Regulate The Cosmetic Industry, Maria Monastra

William & Mary Business Law Review

In recent years, the cosmetic industry has experienced an increase in litigation brought on by consumers in their efforts to protect themselves from cosmetics that are either unsafe or falsely advertised. The Supreme Court of the United States’ discussion in POM Wonderful v. Coca-Cola Co. of the Lanham Act, the United States’ principal false advertising statute, clarified the breadth and depth of allowable lawsuits brought under the statute in matters which also concern the Food, Drug, & Cosmetic Act (FDCA). The case centered on a detailed discussion of the issue of federal preemption. Although the decision directly involved only the food ...


A Pragmatist’S View Of Promissory Law With A Focus On Consent And Reliance, Robert A. Hillman 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

A Pragmatist’S View Of Promissory Law With A Focus On Consent And Reliance, Robert A. Hillman

William & Mary Business Law Review

This Article discusses Professor Nate Oman’s excellent new book, The Dignity of Commerce, which makes an impressive case for how markets can produce “desirable” outcomes for society. In addition to a comprehensive account of what he calls “virtues” of markets, such as their tendency to produce cooperation, trust, and wealth, the book is full of useful and persuasive supporting information and discussions.

Oman is not only a fan of markets, but he asserts that markets are the “center” of contract theory, and provide its normative foundation. Elaborating, Oman concludes that “contract law exists primarily to support markets” and that ...


How Well Do We Treat Each Other In Contract?, Aditi Bagchi 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

How Well Do We Treat Each Other In Contract?, Aditi Bagchi

William & Mary Business Law Review

One of the important contributions of Nathan Oman’s new book is to draw focus onto the quality of the relationships enabled by contract. He claims that contract, by supporting markets, cultivates certain virtues; helps facilitate cooperation among people with diverse commitments; and produces the wealth that may fuel interpersonal and social justice. These claims are all plausible, though subject to individual challenge. However, there is an alternative story to tell about the kinds of relationships that arise from markets--i.e., a story about domination. The experience of domination is driven in part by the necessity, inequality, and competition enjoined ...


Does Contract Law Need Morality?, Kimberly D. Krawiec, Wenhao Liu 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Does Contract Law Need Morality?, Kimberly D. Krawiec, Wenhao Liu

William & Mary Business Law Review

In The Dignity of Commerce, Nathan Oman sets out an ambitious market theory of contract, which he argues is a superior normative foundation for contract law than either the moralist or economic justifications that currently dominate contract theory. In doing so, he sets out a robust defense of commerce and the marketplace as contributing to human flourishing that is a refreshing and welcome contribution in an era of market alarmism. But the market theory ultimately falls short as either a normative or prescriptive theory of contract. The extent to which law, public policy, and theory should account for values other ...


Valuation Of Intellectual Property: Placing A Dollar Value On Technology (Or, Are Real-Options Real?), Gordon V. Smith 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Valuation Of Intellectual Property: Placing A Dollar Value On Technology (Or, Are Real-Options Real?), Gordon V. Smith

Maine Law Review

Valuation professionals have for a long time been appraising business enterprises and their underlying assets. The “dot-com” New Economy has dramatically changed how businesses can do business and has introduced us to some new forms of intellectual property rights. Have these changes altered our valuation methodologies? Prior to the 1960s, when valuation professionals were faced with a situation in which the value of a business enterprise appeared to exceed the value of its underlying assets, the difference was ascribed to “goodwill” or “blue sky.” No real effort was made to identify the constituents of this catch-all category, it was simply ...


The Perfection And Priority Rules For Security Interests In Copyrights, Patents, And Trademarks: The Current Structural Dissonance And Proposed Legislative Cures, Thomas M. Ward 2018 University of Maine School of Law

The Perfection And Priority Rules For Security Interests In Copyrights, Patents, And Trademarks: The Current Structural Dissonance And Proposed Legislative Cures, Thomas M. Ward

Maine Law Review

The structural legal dissonance that undermines the effective financing of federal intellectual property rights (patents, trademarks registrations, copyrights, and maskworks) is rooted in the prominence of title in both the early conceptual history of personal property financing and in the language of the federal tract recording acts. While genuine ownership transfers have always represented the prototype under the federal intellectual property recording statutes, transfers intended for security were also originally included because of the early judicial thinking about the importance of title to the validity (against third parties) of a “mortgage” right in intangible personal property. As products of their ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress