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Environmental Human Rights In New York’S Constitution, Nicholas A. Robinson 2017 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Environmental Human Rights In New York’S Constitution, Nicholas A. Robinson

Pace Law Faculty Publications

There is an environmental case to be made in favor of convening a Constitutional Convention. On the 200th anniversary birth of Henry David Thoreau, we can remember his admonition: “Live in each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.” What has this to do with the Constitution?


The Caa Motor Vehicle Inspection And Maintenance Program: Is It Cost Effective?, Arnold W. Reitze Jr. 2017 S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah

The Caa Motor Vehicle Inspection And Maintenance Program: Is It Cost Effective?, Arnold W. Reitze Jr.

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

Under the Clean Air Act, state-run vehicle inspection and maintenance (I/M) programs aim at preventing both manufacturers and consumers from circumventing or tampering with emissions control technology. Recent manufacturer cheating scandals, however, were detected by means other than I/M programs, and much I/M enforcement has been targeted at relatively low-level offenses. This Article traces the evolution of the I/M program and examines whether it currently provides benefits greater than its costs to vehicle owners, using Utah’s Wasatch Front (which includes Salt Lake City) to illustrate how the program operates in practice. It concludes that there ...


Climate Change And Common But Differentiated Responsibilities For The Ocean, Robin Kundis Craig 2017 S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah

Climate Change And Common But Differentiated Responsibilities For The Ocean, Robin Kundis Craig

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

Nations’ impacts on the ocean and their impacts on climate change are linked, especially given the synergistic interactions among these impacts on the two largest global commons—the atmosphere and the ocean. This article argues that climate change mitigation law, as represented internationally by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and its follow-on agreements, can better reflect nations’ broader Common but Differentiated Responsibilities (CBDR) by taking ocean impacts into account—in particular, contributions to ocean acidification and to marine fishing.


California's Climate Diplomacy And Dormant Preemption, David L. Sloss 2017 Santa Clara University School of Law

California's Climate Diplomacy And Dormant Preemption, David L. Sloss

Faculty Publications

After President Trump announced that the United States would withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, Governor Brown issued a joint statement with his counterparts from New York and Washington, announcing that the three governors “are teaming up to fight climate change in response to President Trump’s” withdrawal decision. A few days later, Governor Brown met in Beijing with China’s President Xi Jinping. The Chinese President reportedly “welcomed California’s efforts to work with the Chinese government to help combat global warming.” According to the California government web site, the state is party to a total of 54 “international ...


Center For Biological Diversity V. Jewell, Lowell J. Chandler 2017 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Center For Biological Diversity V. Jewell, Lowell J. Chandler

Public Land and Resources Law Review

The ESA protects threatened or endangered species, and species likely to become threatened or endangered within the foreseeable future, throughout all or a significant portion of their range. In Center for Biological Diversity v. Jewell, the United States District Court for the District of Arizona overturned a Fish and Wildlife Service policy defining the significant portion of range language in the ESA. The policy interpretation limited ESA protections to apply only when a species faced risk of extinction throughout its entire range. The court deemed this policy impermissible because it effectively rendered the significant portion of range language meaningless. The ...


Save Our Cabinets V. U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Jaclyn Van Natta 2017 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Save Our Cabinets V. U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Jaclyn Van Natta

Public Land and Resources Law Review

No abstract provided.


Climate Change Litigation: Opening The Door To The International Court Of Justice, Andrew L. Strauss 2017 University of Dayton

Climate Change Litigation: Opening The Door To The International Court Of Justice, Andrew L. Strauss

Andrew L. Strauss

In March 2003, I wrote an article for the Environmental Law Reporter surveying potential international judicial forums where victims of global warming could bring lawsuits. In the ensuing six years, numerous lawsuits have been brought in the United States and in other countries, and environmentalists can now celebrate their first significant victory. In April 2007, based upon its finding that greenhouse gases are pollutants under Section 202(a)(1) of the U.S. Clean Air Act, the Supreme Court in Massachusetts v. EPA held that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the authority to regulate greenhouse gases.

Though ...


Climate Change Geoengineering: Philosophical Perspectives, Legal Issues, And Governance Frameworks, William C. G. Burns, Andrew L. Strauss 2017 Johns Hopkins University

Climate Change Geoengineering: Philosophical Perspectives, Legal Issues, And Governance Frameworks, William C. G. Burns, Andrew L. Strauss

Andrew L. Strauss

The international community is not taking the action necessary to avert dangerous increases in greenhouse gases. Facing a potentially bleak future, the question that confronts humanity is whether the best of bad alternatives may be to counter global warming through human-engineered climate interventions. In this book, eleven prominent authorities on climate change consider the legal, policy, and philosophical issues presented by geoengineering. The book asks: When, if ever, are decisions to embark on potentially risky climate modification projects justified? If such decisions can be justified, in a world without a central governing authority, who should authorize such projects and by ...


Understanding The Public Trust Doctrine Through Due Process, Michael O'Loughlin 2017 Boston College Law School

Understanding The Public Trust Doctrine Through Due Process, Michael O'Loughlin

Boston College Law Review

The public trust doctrine (“PTD”) could be a powerful tool for environmental lawyers. It protects the public’s right to use and access resources by placing them in trust with the state and guiding the sovereign’s discretion in their management. Although it lies inherent in sovereignty, the law scatters it across constitutional, statutory, and common law sources, hurting its effectiveness. Understanding the public’s beneficiary interest in this public trust as a due process protected property right would help resolve these failings by placing it under the umbrella of the U.S. Constitution’s guarantee against arbitrary deprivations of ...


Fracturing Misconceptions: A History Of Effective State Regulation, Groundwater Protection, And The Ill-Conceived Frac Act, Wes Deweese 2017 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Fracturing Misconceptions: A History Of Effective State Regulation, Groundwater Protection, And The Ill-Conceived Frac Act, Wes Deweese

Oklahoma Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Whatcom County V. Hirst, Et Al, Stephanie A. George 2017 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Whatcom County V. Hirst, Et Al, Stephanie A. George

Public Land and Resources Law Review

Upending decades of common practice in water management and building in the state of Washington, the Washington Supreme Court found Whatcom County violated the state’s Growth Management Act. Whatcom County used the Department of Ecology’s Nooksack Rule in evaluating permits for buildings and subdivisions that rely on permit-exempt wells. This decision affects families across the state of Washington.


Pain In The Ash? Epa's Proposed Regulation Of Fly Ash And The Impending Economic Threat To Sustainable Concrete, Briana Novian 2017 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Pain In The Ash? Epa's Proposed Regulation Of Fly Ash And The Impending Economic Threat To Sustainable Concrete, Briana Novian

Oklahoma Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Rethinking Force Majeure In Public International Law, Myanna Dellinger 2017 University of South Dakota School of Law

Rethinking Force Majeure In Public International Law, Myanna Dellinger

Pace Law Review

Climate change is one of today’s most significant and complex problems. The number and level of severity of extreme weather events is increasing rapidly around the world. One year after the next, we learn that heat records have been broken once again. Climate change has been traced to a wide range of severe problems around the world, ranging from the obvious damage caused by hurricanes, floods, extreme rainfall, prolonged droughts, wildfires and a host of other weather-related issues to the perhaps less obvious such as physical and mental illnesses, “civil unrest, riots, mass migrations and perhaps wars caused by ...


Polar Opposites: Assessing The State Of Environmental Law In The World’S Polar Regions, Mark Nevitt, Robert V. Percival 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Polar Opposites: Assessing The State Of Environmental Law In The World’S Polar Regions, Mark Nevitt, Robert V. Percival

Faculty Scholarship

Climate change is fundamentally transforming both the Arctic and Antarctic polar regions. Yet they differ dramatically in their governing legal regimes. For the past sixty years the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS), a traditional “hard law” international law treaty system, effectively de-militarized the Antarctic region and halted competing sovereignty claims. In contrast, the Arctic region lacks a unifying Arctic treaty and is governed by the newer “soft law” global environmental law model embodied in the Arctic Council’s collaborative work. Now climate change is challenging this model. It is transforming the geography of both polar regions, breaking away massive ice sheets ...


Energy Conservation Grants Under The National Energy Conservation Policy Act Of 1978, Gerald C. Tobin, Reuben & Proctor, Chicago, Illinois 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Energy Conservation Grants Under The National Energy Conservation Policy Act Of 1978, Gerald C. Tobin, Reuben & Proctor, Chicago, Illinois

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Address At The Lincoln Charter Of The Forest Conference, Bishop Grosseteste University: The Charter Of The Forest: Evolving Human Rights In Nature, Nicholas A. Robinson 2017 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Address At The Lincoln Charter Of The Forest Conference, Bishop Grosseteste University: The Charter Of The Forest: Evolving Human Rights In Nature, Nicholas A. Robinson

Pace Law Faculty Publications

This conference is a singular event, long over due. It has been 258 years since William Blackstone celebrated “these two sacred charters,”1 Carta de Foresta and Magna Carta, with his celebrated publication of their authentic texts. In 2015, the Great Charter of Liberties enjoyed scholarly, political and popular focus. The companion Forest Charter was and is too much neglected.2 I salute the American Bar Association, and Dan Magraw, for the ABA’s educational focus of the Forest Charter, as well as Magna Carta. Today we restore some balance with this conference’s searching and insightful examination of the ...


Deep Seeded Problems: A Look At Seed Bank Regulations, Jasmine Patel 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Deep Seeded Problems: A Look At Seed Bank Regulations, Jasmine Patel

Seattle Journal of Environmental Law

This paper examines the importance of preserving plant biodiversity through the use of genetic seed vaults, and how effective global legal and regulatory plans aimed at such preservation are in comparison to approaches being undertaken in the United States. An example of such initiatives, the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Norway, is meant to act as a global back up for other nation’s seed vaults. However, Norway’s laws do not allow for genetically modified organisms (“GMOs”) to be imported, including seeds from genetically modified plants. The United States needs to make sure that domestic vaults are protected by ...


Environmental Regulations And The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Using Investor-State Dispute Settlement To Strengthen Environmental Law, Ai-Li Chiong-Martinson 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Environmental Regulations And The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Using Investor-State Dispute Settlement To Strengthen Environmental Law, Ai-Li Chiong-Martinson

Seattle Journal of Environmental Law

The highly publicized Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement has reignited a long-running debate between environmentalists and free trade advocates about the impacts of the investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) system on the global economy and environmental preservation. The ISDS provision potentially gives foreign investors the right to challenge domestic regulations intending to protect the environment if those regulations discriminate against foreign investors and result in substantial monetary loss to the investors’ property. Critics of the TPP argue that we should learn from the troubling legacy of the North American Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which, according to critics, overwhelmingly favored investors over states ...


Agriculture, Water Pollution, And The Future Of Epa’S Regulatory Authority In A Post-American Farm Bureau Federation V. U.S. Epa America, Henry Brudney 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Agriculture, Water Pollution, And The Future Of Epa’S Regulatory Authority In A Post-American Farm Bureau Federation V. U.S. Epa America, Henry Brudney

Seattle Journal of Environmental Law

Until the recent decision of American Farm Bureau Federation v. U.S. EPA, the EPA’s total maximum daily load (TMDL) regulation under the Clean Water Act contained no substantive standard for water quality. However, in this decision, the Third Circuit added such substantive criteria to the TMDL, which should have a monumental effect on the improvement of water quality standards in the United States.


Of Mines And Men: Toward A Foundational Theory Of The Rise, Evolution And Decay Of Property, Guillermo Arribas Irazola 2017 Yale Law School

Of Mines And Men: Toward A Foundational Theory Of The Rise, Evolution And Decay Of Property, Guillermo Arribas Irazola

Seattle Journal of Environmental Law

Why and how is property created? Through a historical analysis, this paper proposes that property is created not out of ideology, but by chance. Depending on the resources encountered by newcomers, a rising civilization will establish property through a centralized controlling government (a top-down system) or through people’s recognized possession (a bottom-up or Lockean system). In the former, the government will create and allocate property at its own discretion, while in the latter, the government will recognize and provide protection for the property of individuals.

When the Spaniards conquered Peru in the 1528, they found immense amounts of gold ...


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