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California Needs An Environmental Lawyer Like Him, Darryl Gruen 2018 California Public Utilities Commission

California Needs An Environmental Lawyer Like Him, Darryl Gruen

Golden Gate University Law Review

Interview of Darryl Gruen by George Emmons, Executive Articles Editor, Golden Gate University Law Review, in San Francisco, Cal. (Jan. 19, 2018). This article represents the commentary of Darryl Gruen and does not necessarily represent opinions of the California Public Utilities Commission.


California V. U.S. Bureau Of Land Management, Oliver F. Wood 2018 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

California V. U.S. Bureau Of Land Management, Oliver F. Wood

Public Land and Resources Law Review

The United States District Court for the Northern District of California granted a preliminary injunction against the Bureau of Land Management from implementing the Suspension Rule, which would delay the requirements of the Waste Prevention, Production Subject to Royalties, and Resource Conservation Rule. Additionally, the court denied the BLM and intervening third parties’ motion to transfer venue to the District of Wyoming. The court held the plaintiffs were entitled to a preliminary injunction because the BLM did not provide a reasoned analysis for the Suspension Rule. This failure to provide meaningful notice and comment was an arbitrary and capricious abuse ...


Hawai'i Wildlife Fund V. County Of Maui, Lowell J. Chandler 2018 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Hawai'i Wildlife Fund V. County Of Maui, Lowell J. Chandler

Public Land and Resources Law Review

In Hawai’i Wildlife Fund v. County of Maui, the Ninth Circuit held that the plain language of the Clean Water Act provides jurisdiction over indirect discharges of pollutants from a point source into groundwater that is shown to be connected to navigable waters. The court found that studies confirmed pollutants entering the Pacific Ocean were fairly traceable to the County of Maui’s sewage disposal wells. In affirming the district court’s ruling, the Ninth Circuit held that Maui County violated the Clean Water Act by discharging pollutants into a navigable water without the required permit. The court also ...


Atlantic Richfield Company V. Montana Second Judicial District Court, Molly Kelly 2018 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Atlantic Richfield Company V. Montana Second Judicial District Court, Molly Kelly

Public Land and Resources Law Review

Landowners in Opportunity, Montana sought restoration damages from ARCO, Anaconda Copper Mining Company’s successor, to their property from over a century of processing ore at the Anaconda Smelter. ARCO argued that CERCLA preempted and barred any claim for restoration damages. The Montana Supreme Court held: landowners could bring their state common law claims seeking restoration damages; the state district court had subject matter jurisdiction; and landowners’ proposed restoration fund did not challenge EPA’s selected remedy under CERCLA.


Muddying The Chevron Waters: The D.C. Circuit Lacks Doctrinal Clarity In Waterkeeper Alliance V. Epa, Christopher Crocker 2018 Boston College Law School

Muddying The Chevron Waters: The D.C. Circuit Lacks Doctrinal Clarity In Waterkeeper Alliance V. Epa, Christopher Crocker

Boston College Law Review

Chevron deference is one of the most contentious and misunderstood doctrines in administrative law. Justice John Paul Stevens’ opinion in the watershed 1984 case Chevron, USA, Inc. v. Natural Resources Defense Council, Inc. established a two-step framework for courts to use in evaluating agency rule-making authority. That clear two-step process has undergone rewording and revision over the years that has resulted in a lack of doctrinal clarity. On April 11, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit decided Waterkeeper Alliance v. EPA, a challenge brought by environmentalists to an EPA rule that exempted farmers from ...


"Bears Need Room To Roam": The Ninth Circuit's Questionable Interpretation Of Critical Habitat Designation, Katherine Lee 2018 Boston College Law School

"Bears Need Room To Roam": The Ninth Circuit's Questionable Interpretation Of Critical Habitat Designation, Katherine Lee

Boston College Law Review

In February 2016, in Alaska Oil & Gas Ass’n v. Jewell, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit upheld a decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to designate 187,000 square miles in northern Alaska as critical polar bear habitat. The Ninth Circuit rejected the reasoning of the District Court for the District of Alaska which found that the FWS failed to meet the “standard of specificity” required by the Endangered Species Act in determining what geographical areas constituted critical habitat. Rather, the Ninth Circuit focused on the ESA’s broad statutory purposes of ...


The New Mexico Professional Corporation, Robert J. Desiderio, Hugh J. Ault, James W. Smith 2018 University of New Mexico - Main Campus

The New Mexico Professional Corporation, Robert J. Desiderio, Hugh J. Ault, James W. Smith

Robert Desiderio

No abstract provided.


An Ecological, Cultural, And Legal Review Of Pacific Lamprey In The Columbia River Basin, Adam Wicks-Arshack, Matthew Dunkle, Sammy Matsaw, Christopher Caudill 2018 UIdaho Law

An Ecological, Cultural, And Legal Review Of Pacific Lamprey In The Columbia River Basin, Adam Wicks-Arshack, Matthew Dunkle, Sammy Matsaw, Christopher Caudill

Idaho Law Review

Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) is an anadromous species in an ancient lineage of jawless fishes. The species is native to the North Pacific and its marine-accessible freshwater rivers and streams. Pacific lamprey are understudied relative to other anadromous fishes and has severely declined in abundance throughout the Columbia River Basin. Indigenous people of the Snake and Columbia River Basins have long recognized the ecological role and value of lamprey through their spiritual and cultural practices connected to Pacific lamprey. The combined effects of poor passage at dams, historic and continued habitat degradation, and altered marine host conditions have contributed to ...


Structuring Better Caps For Sustainability Incentive Programs, Courtney Moran, Casey Ball 2018 UIdaho Law

Structuring Better Caps For Sustainability Incentive Programs, Courtney Moran, Casey Ball

Idaho Law Review

Policymakers who are eager to promote the development and adoption of environmentally sustainable technologies too often ignore certain important regulatory principles when crafting incentive programs. Some approaches to limiting and winding down sustainability incentive programs have proven to be inefficient and unjust. Too often, the winding down process only begins when lawmakers face unpredicted budgetary constraints. This article argues that state and federal lawmakers could better promote economic efficiency and equity in sustainability-oriented policy design by more consistently adhering to the principles of gradualism, adequate notice, and respect for investment-backed expectations. Using examples of deficiencies in certain net metering program ...


Transboundary Pollution And Cercla Liability: International Manufacturers' Ability To Exploit Aerial Depositions, Connor M. Callahan 2018 UIdaho Law

Transboundary Pollution And Cercla Liability: International Manufacturers' Ability To Exploit Aerial Depositions, Connor M. Callahan

Idaho Law Review

The Trail Smelter has a long and extensive history of pollution issues. The most recent claim against the Trail Smelter is the aerial deposition of hazardous waste theory. The Ninth Circuit has rejected attaching Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) liability to the Trail Smelter under the aerial deposition theory, but this holding cannot be accepted if the goal is to control pollution. Many issues arise with controlling transboundary pollution, including the enforcement of international agreements on the matter. In the absence of establishing an enforceable international treaty between the United States and Canada, CERCLA presents a viable ...


An Ecological Theory Of Statutory Interpretation, Nicholas S. Bryner 2018 UIdaho Law

An Ecological Theory Of Statutory Interpretation, Nicholas S. Bryner

Idaho Law Review

Canons of construction serve as a set of ground rules that judges rely on in interpreting statutes. Substantive canons of construction, in particular, are principles and presumptions that point judges in a specific policy direction in order to serve underlying public values. Many of these substantive canons share a common justification: judges have developed them to mitigate threats of irreversible harm to vulnerable and underrepresented interests and to incentivize clarity in the legislative process. This Article argues that environmental interests—the interests of present and future generations in maintaining ecological conditions that support life—merit similar protection. Therefore, judges should ...


Environmental Issues For The '90s: Golden-Cheeked Warblers And Yellowfin Tuna, Ernest E. Smith 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Environmental Issues For The '90s: Golden-Cheeked Warblers And Yellowfin Tuna, Ernest E. Smith

Maine Law Review

Environmental issues have transformed the areas of law that I have taught for the last thirty-one years. A decade ago environmental law went virtually unmentioned in courses in property, domestic oil and gas law, and international transactions. By 1995 environmental concerns had moved from the periphery to center stage in these legal fields. To someone who teaches and writes about these subjects, the clearest manifestation of this development has been that virtually every first-year property casebook, mining or oil and gas law casebook, and international business transactions casebook, written in the last five years now includes segments on environmental law ...


Recurrent Flooding, Sea Level Rise, And The Relocation Of At-Risk Communities: Case Studies From The Commonwealth Of Virginia, Jeffrey Moore, Lauren Acker 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Recurrent Flooding, Sea Level Rise, And The Relocation Of At-Risk Communities: Case Studies From The Commonwealth Of Virginia, Jeffrey Moore, Lauren Acker

Virginia Coastal Policy Center

No abstract provided.


Sea Level Rise And Recurrent Flooding: A Toolbox For Local Governments In Virginia, Victor Unnone, Jonathan Lubrano 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Sea Level Rise And Recurrent Flooding: A Toolbox For Local Governments In Virginia, Victor Unnone, Jonathan Lubrano

Virginia Coastal Policy Center

No abstract provided.


Waterfront Property Rights: The Potential Impact Of Government Projects, Emily Messer 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Waterfront Property Rights: The Potential Impact Of Government Projects, Emily Messer

Virginia Coastal Policy Center

No abstract provided.


Harvest The Wind, Harvest Your Dinner: Using Law To Encourage An Offshore Energy-Food Multiple-Use Nexus, Robin Kundis Craig 2018 S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah

Harvest The Wind, Harvest Your Dinner: Using Law To Encourage An Offshore Energy-Food Multiple-Use Nexus, Robin Kundis Craig

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

Most scholars discuss the food-water-energy-climate nexus as it emerges on land. Less attention has been paid to the food-water-energy-climate nexus as it exists in the ocean, but that nexus exists—and it is beginning to be strained. This Article, a companion piece to the forthcoming “It’s Not Just an Offshore Wind Farm,” explores the international drive to combine offshore wind facilities with marine aquaculture, an emerging example of the water-energy-food nexus in the marine environment. Many nations are becoming increasingly interested in both offshore wind farms and open ocean marine aquaculture, but both enterprises take up considerable space in ...


The Control Of Methane And Voc Emissions From Oil And Gas Operations In The Western United States, Arnold W. Reitze Jr. 2018 S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah

The Control Of Methane And Voc Emissions From Oil And Gas Operations In The Western United States, Arnold W. Reitze Jr.

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

This article discusses the regulation of hydrocarbon emissions, including the emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, from the oil and gas industry in the western United States. It covers the regulations of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Bureau of Land Management, and other Federal agencies. It also discusses the state laws of the major oil and gas producing western states: California, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. It covers operations on public, state, and private lands, but it does not cover oil and gas operations on Indian lands that are the subject of the author’s previous article.


Green Justice, The Environment And The Courts, Ruth L. Kovnat 2018 University of New Mexico - Main Campus

Green Justice, The Environment And The Courts, Ruth L. Kovnat

Ruth L. Kovnat

No abstract provided.


Air Pollution, Ruth L. Kovnat 2018 University of New Mexico - Main Campus

Air Pollution, Ruth L. Kovnat

Ruth L. Kovnat

No abstract provided.


The Oil & Gas Industry: Failing To Properly Regulate Hydraulic Fracturing & Placing Profits Over Safety, Ellery Gordon 2018 Pepperdine University

The Oil & Gas Industry: Failing To Properly Regulate Hydraulic Fracturing & Placing Profits Over Safety, Ellery Gordon

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

This Note will evaluate the regulations and environmental implications surrounding hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” on state, federal, and Indian lands, focusing on the recent and still undecided case of Wyoming v. United States Dep’t of the Interior. Additionally, it will address the regulatory gap in federal regulations governing hydraulic fracturing, the current issues the industry faces, and advocate for a more stringent set of regulations that ought to be applied on a uniform basis throughout the United States. In the aforementioned case, Wyoming, Colorado, North Dakota, Utah, and the Ute Indian Tribe brought suit against the Bureau of Land ...


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