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Articles 1 - 30 of 4993

Full-Text Articles in Law and Politics

Backlash Against International Courts In West, East And Southern Africa: Causes And Consequences, Karen J. Alter, James T. Gathii, Laurence R. Helfer Jun 2019

Backlash Against International Courts In West, East And Southern Africa: Causes And Consequences, Karen J. Alter, James T. Gathii, Laurence R. Helfer

James T Gathii

This paper discusses three credible attempts by African governments to restrict the jurisdiction of three similarly-situated sub-regional courts in response to politically controversial rulings. In West Africa, when the ECOWAS Court upheld allegations of torture by opposition journalists in the Gambia, that country’s political leaders sought to restrict the Court’s power to review human rights complaints. The other member states ultimately defeated the Gambia’s proposal. In East Africa, Kenya failed in its efforts to eliminate the EACJ and to remove some of its judges after a decision challenging an election to a sub-regional legislature. However, the member ...


Correspondence With A. Willis Robertson, Lewis F. Powell, Jr. Jun 2019

Correspondence With A. Willis Robertson, Lewis F. Powell, Jr.

Powell Correspondence

No abstract provided.


The Twenty-Fifth Amendment: Law, History, And Recommendations For Reform, John D. Feerick, John Rogan Jun 2019

The Twenty-Fifth Amendment: Law, History, And Recommendations For Reform, John D. Feerick, John Rogan

Miscellaneous

Handout for The Twenty-Fifth Amendment: Law, History, and Recommendations for Reform.


Shelby County And Local Governments: A Case Study Of Local Texas Governments Diluting Minority Votes, Sydnee Fielkow Jun 2019

Shelby County And Local Governments: A Case Study Of Local Texas Governments Diluting Minority Votes, Sydnee Fielkow

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

No abstract provided.


The “Conscience” Rule: How Will It Affect Patients’ Access To Health Services?, Lawrence O. Gostin Jun 2019

The “Conscience” Rule: How Will It Affect Patients’ Access To Health Services?, Lawrence O. Gostin

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

On May 2, 2019, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Office of Civil Rights (OCR) released a final rule that heightens the rights of hospitals and health workers to refuse to participate in patients’ medical care based on religious or moral grounds. The rule covers OCR’s authority to investigate and enforce violations of 25 federal “conscience protection” laws. Tied to the US Constitution’s spending power, the rule applies to state and local governments, as well as public and private health care professionals and entities if they receive federal funds such as Medicare or Medicaid ...


Religious Freedom And The Federal Executive Branch: Suggestions For Future Administrations, Melissa Rogers Jun 2019

Religious Freedom And The Federal Executive Branch: Suggestions For Future Administrations, Melissa Rogers

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Paradox Of The Black Church And Religious Freedom, Jacqueline C. Rivers Jun 2019

The Paradox Of The Black Church And Religious Freedom, Jacqueline C. Rivers

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Ten Reasons We Need Rigorous Research On Effective Compassion, Byron R. Johnson Jun 2019

Ten Reasons We Need Rigorous Research On Effective Compassion, Byron R. Johnson

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


America's Founders, Religious Liberty, And The Common Good, Mark David Hall Jun 2019

America's Founders, Religious Liberty, And The Common Good, Mark David Hall

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Earthly Good Of Being Heavenly Minded: The Economic Value Of Us Religion, Brian J. Grim Jun 2019

The Earthly Good Of Being Heavenly Minded: The Economic Value Of Us Religion, Brian J. Grim

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Promises, Practices, And Consequences Of Religious Freedom: A Global Overview, Roger Finke, Dane R. Mataic Jun 2019

Promises, Practices, And Consequences Of Religious Freedom: A Global Overview, Roger Finke, Dane R. Mataic

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Catholic Thought On The Common Good: A Place For Establishment Clause Limits To Religious Exercise, Angela C. Carmella Jun 2019

Catholic Thought On The Common Good: A Place For Establishment Clause Limits To Religious Exercise, Angela C. Carmella

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Common Good Requires Robust Institutional Religious Freedom, Stanley Carlson-Thies Jun 2019

The Common Good Requires Robust Institutional Religious Freedom, Stanley Carlson-Thies

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Religious Freedom And The Common Good: A Summary Of Arguments And Issues, Thomas C. Berg Jun 2019

Religious Freedom And The Common Good: A Summary Of Arguments And Issues, Thomas C. Berg

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Restoring Effective Congressional Oversight: Reform Proposals For The Enforcement Of Congressional Subpoenas, Kia Rahnama Jun 2019

Restoring Effective Congressional Oversight: Reform Proposals For The Enforcement Of Congressional Subpoenas, Kia Rahnama

Journal of Legislation

This Article proposes possible legislative reforms to Congress’s exercise of its contempt power in combating non-compliance with subpoenas duly issued as part of congressional investigations. With the recent trends in leveraging congressional investigations as an effective tool of separation of powers, this Article seeks to explore the exact bounds of congressional power in responding to executive officers’ noncompliance with congressional subpoenas, and whether or not current practice could be expanded beyond what has historically been tried by the legislative branch. This Article provides a brief summary of the historic practice behind different options for responding to non-compliance with subpoenas ...


When Soft Law Meets Hard Politics: Taming The Wild West Of Nonprofit Political Involvement, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer Jun 2019

When Soft Law Meets Hard Politics: Taming The Wild West Of Nonprofit Political Involvement, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer

Journal of Legislation

Beginning in the 1990s and continuing today, many of the legal and psychological barriers to nonprofits becoming involved in electoral politics have fallen. At the same time, political divisions have sharpened, causing candidates, political parties, and their supporters to scramble more aggressively for any possible edge in winner-take-all political contests. In the face of these developments, many nonprofits have violated the remaining legal rules applicable to their political activity with little fear of negative consequences, especially given vague rules and a paucity of enforcement resources. Such violations include under reporting of political activity in government filings, fly-by-night organizations that exist ...


Our Administered Constitution: Administrative Constitutionalism From The Founding To The Present, Sophia Z. Lee Jun 2019

Our Administered Constitution: Administrative Constitutionalism From The Founding To The Present, Sophia Z. Lee

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This article argues that administrative agencies have been primary interpreters and implementers of the federal Constitution throughout the history of the United States, although the scale and scope of this "administrative constitutionalism" has changed significantly over time as the balance of opportunities and constraints has shifted. Courts have nonetheless cast an increasingly long shadow over the administered Constitution. In part, this is because of the well-known expansion of judicial review in the 20th century. But the shift has as much to do with changes in the legal profession, legal theory, and lawyers’ roles in agency administration. The result is that ...


Costs And Challenges Of The Hostile Audience, Frederick Schauer Jun 2019

Costs And Challenges Of The Hostile Audience, Frederick Schauer

Notre Dame Law Review

In my own newly famous city of Charlottesville, Virginia, as well as in Berkeley, Boston, Gainesville, Middlebury, and an increasing number of other locations, individuals and groups engaging in constitutionally protected acts of speaking, marching, parading, protesting, rallying, and demonstrating have become targets for often-large groups of often-disruptive counterprotesters. And although most of the contemporary events have involved neo-Nazi, Ku Klux Klan, and other white supremacist speakers who are met with opposition from audiences on the political left, it has not always been so. Indeed, what we now identify as the problem of the hostile audience has often involved more ...


No Internet Does Not Mean No Protection Under The Cfaa: Why Voting Machines Should Be Covered Under 18 U.S.C. § 1030, Jack Dahm Jun 2019

No Internet Does Not Mean No Protection Under The Cfaa: Why Voting Machines Should Be Covered Under 18 U.S.C. § 1030, Jack Dahm

Notre Dame Law Review

The U.S. Attorney General established a Cyber-Digital Task Force within the Department of Justice (DOJ) in February 2018. This newly created task force released its first public report on July 19, 2018. Then–Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the release of the report, while promising that “[a]t the Department of Justice, we take these threats seriously.” The report was designed to answer the following question: “How is the Department [of Justice] responding to cyber threats?” The report begins by discussing the threat of foreign influence operations, described by the Task Force as “one of the most pressing cyber-enabled ...


Understanding State Agency Independence, Miriam Seifter Jun 2019

Understanding State Agency Independence, Miriam Seifter

Michigan Law Review

Conflicts about the independence of executive branch officials are brewing across the states. Governors vie with separately elected executive officials for policy control; attorneys general and governors spar over who speaks for the state in litigation, and legislatures seek to alter governors’ influence over independent state commissions. These disputes over intrastate authority have weighty policy implications both within states and beyond them, on topics from election administration and energy markets to healthcare and welfare. The disputes also reveal a blind spot. At the federal level, scholars have long analyzed the meaning and effects of agency independence—a dialogue that has ...


'Race, Racism, And American Law': A Seminar From The Indigenous, Black, And Immigrant Legal Perspectives, Eduardo R.C. Capulong, Andrew King-Ries, Monte Mills Jun 2019

'Race, Racism, And American Law': A Seminar From The Indigenous, Black, And Immigrant Legal Perspectives, Eduardo R.C. Capulong, Andrew King-Ries, Monte Mills

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Flagrant racism has characterized the Trump era from the onset. Beginning with the 2016 presidential campaign, Trump has inflamed long-festering racial wounds and unleashed White supremacist reaction to the nation’s first Black President, in the process destabilizing our sense of the nation’s racial progress and upending core principles of legality, equality, and justice. As law professors, we sought to rise to these challenges and prepare the next generation of lawyers to succeed in a different and more polarized future. Our shared commitment resulted in a new course, “Race, Racism, and American Law,” in which we sought to explore ...


Good Of My Patient: Who Gets To Decide?, Lauren Ruvo May 2019

Good Of My Patient: Who Gets To Decide?, Lauren Ruvo

Tennessee Journal of Race, Gender, & Social Justice

Physicians play a crucial role in helping patients make life or death decisions. However, all healthcare professionals have personal beliefs and biases that influence these decisions. This paper explores how physicians are able to uphold the Hippocratic ideal of doing what is in the best interest of the patient while taking into account their personal beliefs and biases. The paper begins by analyzing existing schools of thought around how to do what is best for the patient. While there are many different views, this paper looks at the main three: the bioethical movement, the paternalistic approach to medicine, and the ...


Solidarity Economy Lawyering, Renee Hatcher May 2019

Solidarity Economy Lawyering, Renee Hatcher

Tennessee Journal of Race, Gender, & Social Justice

This essay explores lawyering in the solidarity economy movement as an emergent approach to progressive transactional lawyering. The solidarity economy movement is a set of value-driven theories and practices that seeks to transform the global economy into a just economy that centers the needs of people and the planet. While the solidarity economy movement has been established for several decades in other parts of the world, the solidarity economy movement in the United States emerged in 2007. Over the last decade the movement has grown and gained significant momentum, with the rise of solidarity economy organizations and initiatives, as well ...


Impact Transaction - Using Collective Impact Relational Contracts To Redefine Social Change In The Urban Core, Patience A. Crowder May 2019

Impact Transaction - Using Collective Impact Relational Contracts To Redefine Social Change In The Urban Core, Patience A. Crowder

Tennessee Journal of Race, Gender, & Social Justice

Called a “protest anthem” for urban America, Inner City Blues, the final single from R&B artist Marvin Gaye’s award-wining album What’s Going On, documents American urban life by detailing the systemic barriers to economic independence and social equality that plagued urban residents and the impact of these barriers on their daily lives. The song (and album) were released in 1971 as Gaye’s journalistic exploration of the poverty-induced challenges and frustrations of urban life. Almost fifty years later, unfortunately, not much has changed. This is because the operation of law in urban communities historically not been designed ...


Nathan Roscoe Pound And The Nazis, Peter Rees May 2019

Nathan Roscoe Pound And The Nazis, Peter Rees

Boston College Law Review

When Roscoe Pound, Dean of Harvard Law School, accepted an honorary degree from a leading German university in 1934, it was interpreted as a gesture of support for the Nazi Party. Was this a naïve misstep, or something more sinister? This Article addresses that question. It highlights previously unknown encounters between Pound and senior Nazi figures at the time, and an unusual relationship between Pound and a suspected Nazi agent that lasted throughout the Second World War, and beyond. These revelations necessarily bring into question Pound’s personal ethics and his professional responsibilities as a lawyer.


Filling The Ninth Circuit Vacancies, Carl Tobias May 2019

Filling The Ninth Circuit Vacancies, Carl Tobias

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

Upon Republican President Donald Trump’s inauguration, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit experienced some pressing appellate vacancies, which the Administrative Office of the United States Courts (AO) carefully identified as “judicial emergencies” because the tribunal resolves a massive docket. Last year’s death of the iconic liberal champion Stephen Reinhardt and the late 2017 departure of libertarian former Chief Judge Alex Kozinski—who both assumed pivotal circuit leadership roles over numerous years—and a few of their colleagues’ decision to leave active court service thereafter, mean the tribunal presently confronts four judicial emergencies and resolves ...


Hush Don't Say A Word: Safeguarding Student's Freedom Of Expression In The Trump Era, Laura R. Mcneal May 2019

Hush Don't Say A Word: Safeguarding Student's Freedom Of Expression In The Trump Era, Laura R. Mcneal

Laura R. McNeal

The controversy surrounding NFL player Colin Kaepernick’s act of kneeling during the national anthem in protest of police brutality against people of color continues to permeate public discourse. In March 2017, President Trump referenced Colin Kaepernick’s symbolic act during a rally in Louisville, Kentucky, in an effort to illustrate his strong opposition to anyone kneeling during the national anthem. In this speech, President Trump stated that although many NFL franchise owners were interested in signing Colin Kaepernick, many were afraid of receiving a nasty tweet from him. Likewise, in another speech, President Trump stated, “I think it’s ...


A Second Opinion: Can Windsor V. United States Survive President Trump’S Supreme Court?, Artem M. Joukov May 2019

A Second Opinion: Can Windsor V. United States Survive President Trump’S Supreme Court?, Artem M. Joukov

Journal of Law and Policy

This Article examines President Donald Trump’s recent recomposition of the United States Supreme Court and the potential effects on Windsor v. United States and its progeny. The Article considers whether the shifting balance of the Court may lead to reconsideration of Windsor, particularly via attempted exploits of the weaknesses in the standard of review applied to reach the decision. The Article will conclude that while revolutionary, Windsor lacked the doctrinal clarity of its offspring, Obergefell v. Hodges, and therefore may be at greatest risk of reversal by the increasingly conservative Court. In particular, the Court may rely on the ...


The President, Foreign Policy, And War Powers: A Survey On The Expansion And Setbacks Of Presidential Power, Michael W. Wilt May 2019

The President, Foreign Policy, And War Powers: A Survey On The Expansion And Setbacks Of Presidential Power, Michael W. Wilt

Channels: Where Disciplines Meet

How powerful is the President of the United States in the arena of foreign policy? This question has opened many discussions, and hotly contested debates as to the extent of the president’s actual power. To make matters more complicated, the United States’ foreign policy has developed and evolved over the course of the United States’ more than two-hundred years history. These foreign policy concerns and international conflicts have mired the presidency into debates and consistent trials over the constitutional extent of the presidency, specifically concerning presidential war powers. Moreover, the Presidents have varied in their approaches to each of ...


The Media, A Polarized America & Adr Tools To Enhance Understanding Of Perspectives, Ginsey Varghese Kramarczyk May 2019

The Media, A Polarized America & Adr Tools To Enhance Understanding Of Perspectives, Ginsey Varghese Kramarczyk

Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal

This article will survey: (1) the intended role of the media in a democracy; (2) the current polarized political climate in the United States; (3) the challenges facing the twenty-first century with the growth of technology, cable news, and online platforms; (4) the media's role in perpetuating conflict; and (5) propose that media professionals use Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) tools and processes to increase the public’s understanding of differing perspectives in our conflict-laden political discourse.