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Cultural Heritage Law Commons

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Use Of Native American Tribal Names As Marks, Brian Zark 2015 Michigan State University College of Law

Use Of Native American Tribal Names As Marks, Brian Zark

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Music As Cultural Heritage: Analysis Of The Means Of Preventing The Exploitation Of Intangible Cultural Heritage, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 228 (2015), Ronald Inawat 2015 John Marshall Law School

Music As Cultural Heritage: Analysis Of The Means Of Preventing The Exploitation Of Intangible Cultural Heritage, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 228 (2015), Ronald Inawat

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

What started out as a law school requirement quickly snowballed into an analysis of the relationship between intellectual property and cultural heritage. I am a music guy at heart, having played piano since I was five years old, having composed one song (after multiple tries), and now working directly with musicians and artists. So when I began researching a topic for an article that would connect the dots between the cultural heritage and its respective music, I could only come across legal doctrine and articles that focused heavily on tangible art and artifacts. So what happened to the music? After ...


They Had Nothing, Charles Wilkinson 2015 University of Colorado Law Review

They Had Nothing, Charles Wilkinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


Inventing The Classical Constitution, Herbert J. Hovenkamp 2015 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Inventing The Classical Constitution, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

One recurring call over a century of American constitutional thought is for return to a "classical" understanding of American federal and state Constitutions. "Classical" does not necessarily mean "originalist" or "interpretivist." Some classical views, such as the attempt to revitalize Lochner-style economic due process, find little support in the text of the federal Constitution or any of the contemporary state constitutions. Rather, constitutional meaning is thought to lie in a background link between constitution formation and classical statecraft. The core theory rests on the assumption of a social contract to which everyone in some initial position agreed. Like any contract ...


Beyond Blood Quantum: The Legal And Political Implications Of Expanding Tribal Enrollment, Tommy Miller 2014 Harvard Law School

Beyond Blood Quantum: The Legal And Political Implications Of Expanding Tribal Enrollment, Tommy Miller

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Protecting Traditional Knowledge In International Intellectual Property Law: Imperatives For Protection And Choice Of Modalities, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 25 (2014), Tesh Dagne 2014 John Marshall Law School

Protecting Traditional Knowledge In International Intellectual Property Law: Imperatives For Protection And Choice Of Modalities, 14 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 25 (2014), Tesh Dagne

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The need for protecting traditional knowledge (TK) has been acknowledged in discussion and negotiations under the umbrella of a number of inter-governmental organizations that deal with biodiversity, the environment, indigenous peoples’ rights, human rights, food and agriculture, among others. It has, however, proved difficult to arrive at a consensus on the proper modality that can serve the needs and desires of Indigenous and Local Communities (ILCs) in their economic and cultural participation. The article examines the imperatives for the protection of TK and explores the modalities of TK protection at the international level for regulating the control of, access to ...


Rethinking Resistance: Reflections On The Cultural Lives Of Property, Collective Identity, And Intellectual Property, 47 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1349 (2014), Caroline Joan Picart 2014 John Marshall Law School

Rethinking Resistance: Reflections On The Cultural Lives Of Property, Collective Identity, And Intellectual Property, 47 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1349 (2014), Caroline Joan Picart

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


A New Devil In The White City: The Demolition Of Prentice Women's Hospital And The Failures Of Chicago's Landmarks Ordinance, 48 J. Marshall L. Rev. 391 (2014), Laura Luisi 2014 John Marshall Law School

A New Devil In The White City: The Demolition Of Prentice Women's Hospital And The Failures Of Chicago's Landmarks Ordinance, 48 J. Marshall L. Rev. 391 (2014), Laura Luisi

The John Marshall Law Review

Chicago’s culture is, in large part, defined by its courageous, innovative, and rich architectural history. With such a strong cultural identity comes the responsibility to preserve the City’s character for generations to come. Throughout its history, the City of Chicago allowed architectural masterpieces to succumb to economic and political pressures. The recent decision in Hanna v. City of Chicago left Chicago’s Landmarks Ordinance unscathed, but nevertheless, its inadequacies are showcased by the demolition of the Prentice Women’s Hospital. An examination of the landmark ordinances of other large American cities further demonstrates the shortcomings of Chicago’s ...


''Get Your Asphalt Off My Ancestors!'': Reclaiming Richmond's African Burial Ground, Mai-Linh Hong 2013 Bucknell University

''Get Your Asphalt Off My Ancestors!'': Reclaiming Richmond's African Burial Ground, Mai-Linh Hong

Faculty Journal Articles

By treating spatial conflict as one way communities wrestle with the memory and legacy of slavery, this article unites critical landscape analysis, a tool of legal geography, with legal and cultural analysis and recent scholarship on African American reparations. A slave cemetery lay beneath a parking lot in Shockoe Bottom, a neighborhood of downtown Richmond that was once a major slave-trading hub. In recent years, controversy arose over the site’s use, generating racially charged local debate and two failed lawsuits seeking to preserve the site. This article examines the significance of the African Burial Ground controversy by analyzing its ...


I Like Cabernet And Merlot But I'M Not Drinking Bordeaux: Certified Confusion, 13 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 203 (2013), Angela Huisingh 2013 John Marshall Law School

I Like Cabernet And Merlot But I'M Not Drinking Bordeaux: Certified Confusion, 13 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 203 (2013), Angela Huisingh

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

A trademark’s purpose is to help consumers identify a service or product’s source. To this end, trademark owners may prevent others from using their marks on similar goods. But to ensure that a few savvy businesspersons do not monopolize certain terms, the Lanham Act carves out specific exceptions to trademark protection. Some of these exceptions include indications of geographic origin, such as Bordeaux and Napa Valley. Wine, however, has long been identified primarily by the geographic region in which its grapes grow. To ameliorate this fundamental divide, and to preserve the integrity of their Geographical Indications in the ...


Introduction: Indigenous Rights In The Pacific Rim, Jonathan A. Franklin 2013 University of Washington School of Law

Introduction: Indigenous Rights In The Pacific Rim, Jonathan A. Franklin

Librarians' Articles

The four articles in this issue all contribute to the dialogue surrounding the intersection of indigenous people's rights within international law and domestic actions that conflict with those rights. While the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and other international law instruments are explicit about how states should act towards indigenous populations, in many cases these nternational instruments conflict with domestic law. There are several reasons for this discrepancy, including states' self-interest, paternalism, and lack of resources needed to address both national concerns and the rights of indigenous peoples.


Rethinking The Rule Of Law As Antidote To African Development Challenges, Joseph M. Isanga 2012 Concordia University School of Law

Rethinking The Rule Of Law As Antidote To African Development Challenges, Joseph M. Isanga

Faculty Scholarship

Undoubtedly, human rights and the rule of law will continue to remain important in addressing a host of international issues. But, when it comes to development on the African Continent, the need to seek broader solutions has never been more urgent Africa's development challenges are extremely complex as they involve deep historical, geographic, ethnic, social, economic, and legal issues that call for multi-faceted approaches and will continue to defy monolithic solutions. Seizing upon indicators of opportunity, some important international actors, such as the United States, may now be more willing to engage in broader approaches. This chapter first critically ...


The Spirit Of Nagpra: The Native American Graves Protection And Repatriation Act And The Regulation Of Culturally Unidentifiable Remains, Aaron H. Midler 2011 Chicago-Kent College of Law

The Spirit Of Nagpra: The Native American Graves Protection And Repatriation Act And The Regulation Of Culturally Unidentifiable Remains, Aaron H. Midler

Chicago-Kent Law Review

In March 2010, the U.S. Department of the Interior issued a final rule regarding the disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). The rule is controversial, as some commentators argue that the Secretary of the Interior lacks the authority under the statute to regulate these remains. This Note analyzes the legitimacy of the final rule in light of federal administrative law precedent as well as the origin and purpose of NAGPRA. It also discusses two well-known cases arising under the statute and the effect that the final rule will have ...


Who Are The Beneficiaries Of Fisk University's Stieglitz Collection?, Alan Feld 2011 Boston Univeristy School of Law

Who Are The Beneficiaries Of Fisk University's Stieglitz Collection?, Alan Feld

Faculty Scholarship

Most fiduciary relationships determine with specificity the beneficiaries of the fiduciary's activities. Not-for-profit entities, however, serve a class of unspecified beneficiaries and can exercise discretion in determining who to serve and how to serve them. This paper explores the limits of discretion that recent litigation established for Fisk University in balancing its educational mission and its administration of a valuable art collection donated decades earlier. The paper analyzes the case as it addresses respect for donor conditions, changes in circumstance, standing issues, the doctrine of cy pres and the designation of the appropriate class of public beneficiaries. Race and ...


Elizabeth Taylor's Van Gogh: An Alternative Route To Restitution Of Holocaust Art?, Stephen K. Urice 2011 University of Miami School of Law

Elizabeth Taylor's Van Gogh: An Alternative Route To Restitution Of Holocaust Art?, Stephen K. Urice

Articles

No abstract provided.


Defending The "Indefensible": Replacing Ethnocentrism With A Native American Cultural Defense, Megan H. Dearth 2011 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Defending The "Indefensible": Replacing Ethnocentrism With A Native American Cultural Defense, Megan H. Dearth

American Indian Law Review

No abstract provided.


Silencing The Public's Voice: The Adverse Effects Of Mountain Communities For Responsible Energy V. Public Service Commission Of West Virginia, Michelle Green 2011 West Virginia University College of Law

Silencing The Public's Voice: The Adverse Effects Of Mountain Communities For Responsible Energy V. Public Service Commission Of West Virginia, Michelle Green

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Resolving The Disjunction Between Cultural Property Policy And Law: A Call For Reform, Andrew L. Adler, Stephen K. Urice 2011 University of Miami School of Law

Resolving The Disjunction Between Cultural Property Policy And Law: A Call For Reform, Andrew L. Adler, Stephen K. Urice

Articles

Cultural property policy in the United States has become increasingly lawless, for lack of a better term. In recent years, the executive branch has aggressively restricted the movement of cultural property into the United States, but it has repeatedly done so without regard for constraining legal authority. The result is a troubling disjunction between the executive branch's (the "Executive") current cultural property policies and the existing legal framework established by Congress and the Judiciary. We document that disjunction in this Article.

We explain, for example, how the executive branch has recently repatriated an Egyptian sarcophagus and an antique French ...


"Willful Patent Filing": A Criminal Procedure Protecting Traditional Knowledge, Vincent M. Smoczynski 2010 Chicago-Kent College of Law

"Willful Patent Filing": A Criminal Procedure Protecting Traditional Knowledge, Vincent M. Smoczynski

Chicago-Kent Law Review

This article explores the interaction between current intellectual property regimes and traditional knowledge and concludes that national laws currently in place inadequately protect traditional knowledge holders. When property rights are granted on traditional knowledge, the effects can extend not only to the indigenous communities, but to the surrounding ecosystems and the global market. Commercialization and increased demand leads to shortages in natural resources and increased prices. Therefore, in order to ensure that patent applicants are deterred from acquiring property rights in traditional knowledge, as well that traditional knowledge holders receive proper benefits for their labor and knowledge, this article advocates ...


Patchwork Protection: Copyright Law And Quilted Art, 9 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 855 (2010), Maureen Collins 2010 John Marshall Law School

Patchwork Protection: Copyright Law And Quilted Art, 9 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 855 (2010), Maureen Collins

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Historically, quilts have been denied the same copyright protection available to any other expression in a fixed medium. When quilts have been considered protectable, the protectable elements in a pattern have been limited, or the application of the substantial similarity test has varied widely. One possible explanation for this unequal treatment is that quilting is viewed as ‘women’s work.’ Another is that quilts are primarily functional. However, quilts have evolved over time and may now be expensive collectible pieces of art; art that deserves copyright protection. This article traces the history of quilt making, addresses the varying standards of ...


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