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The Uk Forensic Science Regulator: A Model For Forensic Science Regulation?, Carole McCartney, Emmanuel N. Amoako 2018 Northumbria Law School

The Uk Forensic Science Regulator: A Model For Forensic Science Regulation?, Carole Mccartney, Emmanuel N. Amoako

Georgia State University Law Review

The use of an array of scientific techniques and technologies is now considered customary within criminal justice, with technological developments and scientific advancements regularly added to the crime investigator’s arsenal. However, the scientific basis, reliability, and fallibility of the application of such “forensic science” (and the resulting scientific evidence) continues to come under intense scrutiny. In response to apparently irremediable problems with the quality of scientific evidence in the United Kingdom (UK), the government created the role of “Forensic Science Regulator” in 2007.

The introduction of a regulator was intended to establish quality standards for all forensic science providers ...


Deploying The Secret Police: The Use Of Algorithms In The Criminal Justice System, Jessica Gabel Cino 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Deploying The Secret Police: The Use Of Algorithms In The Criminal Justice System, Jessica Gabel Cino

Georgia State University Law Review

Algorithms saturate our lives today; from curated song lists to recommending “friends” and news feeds, they factor into some of the most human aspects of decision-making, tapping into preferences based on an ever-growing amount of data. Regardless of whether the algorithm pertains to routing you around traffic jams or finding your next dinner, there is little regulation and even less transparency regarding just how these algorithms work. Paralleling this societal adoption, the criminal justice system now employs algorithms in some of the most important aspects of investigation and decision-making.

The lack of oversight is abundantly apparent in the criminal justice ...


A Discouraging Omen: A Critical Evaluation Of The Approved Uniform Language For Testimony And Reports For The Forensic Latent Print Discipline, Simon A. Cole 2018 University of California, Irvine

A Discouraging Omen: A Critical Evaluation Of The Approved Uniform Language For Testimony And Reports For The Forensic Latent Print Discipline, Simon A. Cole

Georgia State University Law Review

The theme of the 2018 Georgia State University Law Review symposium is the Future of Forensic Science Reform. In this Article, I will assess the prospects for reform through a critical evaluation of a document published in February 2018 by the United States Department of Justice (DOJ), the Approved Uniform Language for Testimony and Reports for the Forensic Latent Print Discipline (ULTR).

I argue that this document provides reason to be concerned about the prospects of forensic science reform. In Part I, I discuss the background of the ULTR. In Part II, I undertake a critical evaluation of the ULTR ...


Effects Of Senate Bill 4 On Wage-Theft: Why All Workers Are At Risk In Low-Income Occupations, Daniella Salas-Chacon 2018 St. Mary's University School of Law

Effects Of Senate Bill 4 On Wage-Theft: Why All Workers Are At Risk In Low-Income Occupations, Daniella Salas-Chacon

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Abstract forthcoming


Undocumented Crime Victims: Unheard, Unnumbered, And Unprotected, Pauline Portillo 2018 St. Mary's University School of Law

Undocumented Crime Victims: Unheard, Unnumbered, And Unprotected, Pauline Portillo

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Abstract forthcoming


Non-Merit-Based Tests Have No Merit: Restoring District Court Discretion Under § 1915(E)(1), John R. FitzGerald 2018 Notre Dame Law School

Non-Merit-Based Tests Have No Merit: Restoring District Court Discretion Under § 1915(E)(1), John R. Fitzgerald

Notre Dame Law Review

This Note evaluates the circuit split regarding the provision of counsel in prisoner civil rights cases and proposes a uniform test. Part I describes the historical background of the right to counsel and prisoner litigation in the United States. Part II outlines the current circuit split regarding § 1915(e)(1). Part III explains why all district courts should consider merit and substance, using a case study to illustrate the deficiencies of non-merit-based tests. Part IV demonstrates why merit and substance are the best metrics for deciding when to provide counsel. Ultimately, this Note asserts that all district judges should consider ...


I Know What It's Like.Pdf, Jennifer Levy-Tatum 2018 Lincoln Memorial University - Duncan School of Law

I Know What It's Like.Pdf, Jennifer Levy-Tatum

Jennifer W. Levy-Tatum

This is a RAP song.


The Judicial Admission Of Faulty Scientific Expert Evidence Informing Wrongful Convictions, Alexandra CC Derwin 2018 University of Manitoba

The Judicial Admission Of Faulty Scientific Expert Evidence Informing Wrongful Convictions, Alexandra Cc Derwin

Western Journal of Legal Studies

The failure of a judge to properly conduct a voir dire to ensure an expert is sufficiently qualified to give evidence in a particular area may give rise to a wrongful conviction. Considering Recommendation 130 from the Goudge Inquiry, that “trial judges should be vigilant in exercising their gatekeeping role with respect to the admissibility of [expert] evidence”, it is essential to examine recent shortcomings of judicial vigilance in admitting expert evidence and to consider how to remedy similar errors in future cases.

The major shortcoming of judicial gatekeepers in admitting expert evidence is the improper application of case law ...


Straddling The Liminal Space Section 810.01(3) Recognizance: Preventative Justice Or Preventing Justice, Rebecca L. Louis 2018 McGill University Faculty of Law

Straddling The Liminal Space Section 810.01(3) Recognizance: Preventative Justice Or Preventing Justice, Rebecca L. Louis

Western Journal of Legal Studies

This paper inquires into the constitutionality of the section 810.01 "fear of terrorism" offence that was introduced into the Criminal Code under the Anti-Terrorism Act, 2015 amendments. Ordinarily, criminal justice and sentencing intersect at the punishment of offenders for crimes they have committed. However, post 9/11, in reaction to the fear of terrorism, the focus has shifted from punishing past crimes to crime prevention. That is, certain preventative measures may be imposed in the absence of a charge, trial or conviction. Arguably, the power to detain or control the movements of persons without charging them challenges the so-called ...


The Journey To Universal Legal Aid: Protecting The Criminally Accuseds' Charter Rights By Introducing A Public Defender System To Ontario, Benjamin D. Schnell 2018 Western University

The Journey To Universal Legal Aid: Protecting The Criminally Accuseds' Charter Rights By Introducing A Public Defender System To Ontario, Benjamin D. Schnell

Western Journal of Legal Studies

There is a significant gap between the demand for legal aid and Legal Aid Ontario (LAO)'s ability to fulfill that demand, meaning that there is a sizeable percentage of the population who, when facing criminal charges, neither qualify for legal aid nor can afford legal representation. This has the effect of denying the accused their Charter protected right to a fair trial and their ability to make full answer and defence, as studies show that a self-represented accused faces significant barriers at trial leading to negative outcomes. The few mechanisms available to help assist a self- represented accused with ...


Cooper V. State, 134 Nev. 52 (July 26, 2018) (En Banc), Xheni Ristani 2018 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Cooper V. State, 134 Nev. 52 (July 26, 2018) (En Banc), Xheni Ristani

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court invoked its supervisory powers and adopted a rule of admissibility to limit the use of a probationer’s testimony in a subsequent criminal proceeding.


"Cerd-Ain" Reform: Dismantling The School-To-Prison Pipeline Through More Thorough Coordination Of The Departments Of Justice And Education, Lisa A. Rich 2018 Selected Works

"Cerd-Ain" Reform: Dismantling The School-To-Prison Pipeline Through More Thorough Coordination Of The Departments Of Justice And Education, Lisa A. Rich

Lisa A. Rich

In the last year of his presidency, President Barack Obama and his administration have undertaken many initiatives to ensure that formerly incarcerated individuals have more opportunities to successfully reenter society. At the same time, the administration has been working on education policy that closes the achievement gap and slows the endless flow of juveniles into the school-to-prison pipeline. While certainly laudable, there is much more that can be undertaken collaboratively among executive branch agencies to end the school-to-prison pipeline and the endless cycle of people re-entering the criminal justice system.

This paper examines the rise of the school-to-prison pipeline through ...


The Abiding Problem Of Witness Statements In International Criminal Trials, Megan A. Fairlie 2018 Florida International University College of Law

The Abiding Problem Of Witness Statements In International Criminal Trials, Megan A. Fairlie

Megan A. Fairlie

Recent amendments to the Rules of Procedure and Evidence for the International Criminal Court (“ICC”) give Trial Chambers the discretion to admit unexamined, party-generated witness statements in lieu of live testimony. The use of this evidence—which undermines the right of confrontation and prevents the judges from independently assessing witness credibility—is now a hotly contested issue in each of the Court’s ongoing trials. As ICC judges grapple with the thorny question of how to implement these new provisions without undermining the right to a fair trial, this Article, which is the first to examine the rule amendments and ...


The Context Of Violence: The Lautenberg Amendment & Interpretive Issues In The Gun Control Act, Rachel B. Polan 2018 Brooklyn Law School

The Context Of Violence: The Lautenberg Amendment & Interpretive Issues In The Gun Control Act, Rachel B. Polan

Brooklyn Law Review

Few areas of the law are as hotly debated as gun control, or as universally condemned as domestic violence – and the Supreme Court’s decisions on the Lautenberg Amendment address both. An amendment to the Gun Control Act, it prohibits persons convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence from owning a firearm. The amendment qualifies a predicate conviction as one that has a “force clause” as an element. In particular, while looking at the force in domestic violence, the Supreme Court has acknowledged that one must also look to context: a “squeeze of an arm” of an intimate partner ...


State Of Nevada V. Second Judicial District Court., 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 51 (Jul. 19, 2018), Ronald Evans 2018 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

State Of Nevada V. Second Judicial District Court., 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 51 (Jul. 19, 2018), Ronald Evans

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court determined that when the State allows a defendant to plead guilty to a first offense domestic battery for a second offense of domestic battery, the State must treat the second conviction as a first conviction for enhancement purposes unless the defendant receives appropriate clarification and warning of the State’s intention to use the second conviction as a second conviction for future enhancement purposes.


Litigating Federal Habeas Corpus Cases: One Equitable Gateway At A Time, Eve Brensike Primus 2018 University of Michigan Law School

Litigating Federal Habeas Corpus Cases: One Equitable Gateway At A Time, Eve Brensike Primus

Other Publications

Habeas corpus, also known as the Great Writ, was meant to be a “bulwark against convictions that violate fundamental fairness,” according to the Supreme Court. Yet today, federal courts provide relief in fewer than half of one percent of cases in which a non-capital state prisoner seeks relief through habeas. The Great Writ, it would seem, is no longer so great. In Litigating Federal Habeas Corpus Cases: One Equitable Gateway at a Time, Eve Brensike Primus examines the various procedural and substantive hurdles that have been erected in the past half century that make it nearly impossible for state prisoners ...


Habeas Won And Lost: The Eleventh Circuit’S Narrow View Of State Court Judgments, Christina M. Frohock 2018 University of Miami School of Law

Habeas Won And Lost: The Eleventh Circuit’S Narrow View Of State Court Judgments, Christina M. Frohock

University of Miami Law Review

The Eleventh Circuit vacated its panel opinion in Patterson v. Secretary and reheard the case en banc. The court’s new opinion revisits the prohibition against “second or successive” habeas corpus petitions in 28 U.S.C. § 2244(b) and embraces the dissenting view in the prior opinion, rejecting the reasoning of the majority. A new state court judgment resets the habeas clock, allowing a prisoner to file an additional federal habeas petition without running afoul of section 2244(b). Previously, the court offered an expansive view of such judgments, looking to whether the state court has substantively changed the ...


A Touchy Subject: The Eleventh Circuit’S Tug-Of-War Over What Constitutes Violent “Physical Force”, Conrad Kahn, Danli Song 2018 University of Miami Law School

A Touchy Subject: The Eleventh Circuit’S Tug-Of-War Over What Constitutes Violent “Physical Force”, Conrad Kahn, Danli Song

University of Miami Law Review

No abstract provided.


Why Is It Wrong To Punish Thought?, Gabriel S. Mendlow 2018 University of Michigan Law School

Why Is It Wrong To Punish Thought?, Gabriel S. Mendlow

Articles

It’s a venerable maxim of criminal jurisprudence that the state must never punish people for their mere thoughts—for their beliefs, desires, fantasies, and unexecuted intentions. This maxim is all but unquestioned, yet its true justification is something of a mystery. In this Essay, I argue that each of the prevailing justifications is deficient, and I conclude by proposing a novel one. The proposed justification captures the widely shared intuition that punishing a person for her mere thoughts isn’t simply disfavored by the balance of reasons but is morally wrongful in itself, an intrinsic (i.e., consequence-independent) injustice ...


Sex Buyers: The "Demand Side" Of Sex Trafficking, Lauren Martin, Ph.D 2018 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Sex Buyers: The "Demand Side" Of Sex Trafficking, Lauren Martin, Ph.D

University of St. Thomas Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


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