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Droit De Suite, Copyright’S First Sale Doctrine And Preemption Of State Law, David E. Shipley 2017 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Droit De Suite, Copyright’S First Sale Doctrine And Preemption Of State Law, David E. Shipley

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

The primary focus of this article is whether California’s forty-year old droit de suite statute; the California Resale Royalty Act (CRRA), is subject to federal preemption under the Copyright Act. This issue is now being litigated in the Ninth Circuit, and this article concludes that the CRRA is preempted under section 301(a) of the Copyright Act and under the Supremacy Clause because it at odds with copyright’s well-established first sale doctrine.

The basic idea of droit de suite is that each time an artist’s work is resold by a dealer or auction house, the artist is ...


#Ncaa Vs. Student Athletes: An Empirical Analysis Of Ncaa Social Media Policies, Elizabeth M. Heintzelman 2017 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

#Ncaa Vs. Student Athletes: An Empirical Analysis Of Ncaa Social Media Policies, Elizabeth M. Heintzelman

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

This article argues that the NCAA and its universities should not have any form of social media policy as it creates First and Fourth Amendment violations, as well as a liability for both the NCAA and its member schools. A social media policy should not limit constitutional rights, but rather any policy should educate the youth about important issues such as cyber-bullying, versus limiting constitutional rights. This article will focus on several issues: 1) whether the relationship between the NCAA and its student athletes constitutes an employer-employee relationship; 2) an evaluation of the social media policies concerning private employers and ...


Nonsense You Say, Nicholas W. Allard 2017 Brooklyn Law School

Nonsense You Say, Nicholas W. Allard

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The “Sovereigns Of Cyberspace” And State Action: The First Amendment’S Application (Or Lack Thereof) To Third-Party Platforms, Jonathan Peters 2017 University of Georgia

The “Sovereigns Of Cyberspace” And State Action: The First Amendment’S Application (Or Lack Thereof) To Third-Party Platforms, Jonathan Peters

Scholarly Works

Many scholars have commented that the state action doctrine forecloses use of the First Amendment to constrain the policies and practices of online service providers. But few have comprehensively studied this issue, and the seminal article exploring “[c]yberspace and the [s]tate [a]ction [d]ebate” is fifteen years old, published before the U.S. Supreme Court reformulated the federal approach to state action. It is important to give the state action doctrine regular scholarly attention, not least because it is increasingly clear that “the private sector has a shared responsibility to help safeguard free expression.” It is critical ...


Lessons Learned Too Well: Anonymity In A Time Of Surveillance, A. Michael Froomkin 2017 University of Miami School of Law

Lessons Learned Too Well: Anonymity In A Time Of Surveillance, A. Michael Froomkin

Articles

It is no longer reasonable to assume that electronic communications can be kept private from governments or private-sector actors. In theory, encryption can protect the content of such communications, and anonymity can protect the communicator's identity. But online anonymity-one of the two most important tools that protect online communicative freedom-is under practical and legal attack all over the world. Choke-point regulation, online identification requirements, and data-retention regulations combine to make anonymity very difficult as a practical matter and, in many countries, illegal. Moreover, key internet intermediaries further stifle anonymity by requiring users to disclose their real names.

This Article ...


Arbitration For The “Afflicted” — The Viability Of Arbitrating Defamation And Libel Claims Considering Ipso’S Pilot Program, Emma Altheide 2017 University of Missouri School of Law

Arbitration For The “Afflicted” — The Viability Of Arbitrating Defamation And Libel Claims Considering Ipso’S Pilot Program, Emma Altheide

Journal of Dispute Resolution

Filing suit for defamation or libel is signing up for an expensive and time-consuming endeavor. If it proceeds to trial, this type of litigation comes with high costs for both sides: potentially millions of dollars in legal fees, and years of court battles. Average judgments against defendant publishers are high, often because uncapped punitive damages are available. Plaintiffs may wait years to receive a judgment, only to spend a significant portion on attorneys’ fees. Given the inefficiency of the courts in handling defamation and libel claims, how might an alternative forum provide for a quicker process, with lower costs for ...


Throttle Me Not: 2015 Open Internet Order Protects Unlimited Data Plan Users, Shawn Marcum 2017 American University Washington College of Law

Throttle Me Not: 2015 Open Internet Order Protects Unlimited Data Plan Users, Shawn Marcum

American University Business Law Review

No abstract provided.


Broadband Privacy Within Network Neutrality: The Fcc's Application Of The Cpni Rules, Justin S. Brown 2016 University of South Florida

Broadband Privacy Within Network Neutrality: The Fcc's Application Of The Cpni Rules, Justin S. Brown

Justin S. Brown

No abstract provided.


Legal Implications Of Direct Satellite Broadcasting – The U.N. Working Group, Nancy M. Lesko 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

Legal Implications Of Direct Satellite Broadcasting – The U.N. Working Group, Nancy M. Lesko

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Unprotected And Unpersuaded: The Fcc's Flawed Merger Review Procedures, Trey O'Callaghan 2016 Duke Law

Unprotected And Unpersuaded: The Fcc's Flawed Merger Review Procedures, Trey O'Callaghan

Duke Law & Technology Review

In CBS Corporation v. FCC, the D.C. Circuit struck down the Federal Communication Commission’s rules for protecting confidential information that it collects during certain merger proceedings. In response, the Commission released a new order, pursuant to the Charter, Time Warner, and Bright House merger proceeding, for protecting confidential information. This iBrief analyzes the policy and legal implications of the Order, arguing that the Order is unlawful because it violates the Trade Secrets Act and notice-and-comment rulemaking requirements.


Proposed Arbitration Ban Would Be Bad Law And Bad Policy, Daniel A. Lyons 2016 Boston College Law School

Proposed Arbitration Ban Would Be Bad Law And Bad Policy, Daniel A. Lyons

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


Mitigating Cyber Risk In It Supply Chains, Maureen Wallace 2016 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Mitigating Cyber Risk In It Supply Chains, Maureen Wallace

The Global Business Law Review

This note argues that the United States needs to utilize current federal agencies to begin introducing cyber supply chain risk management regulation for IT supply chains. Cyber supply chain risk management is a critical area of cybersecurity that has barely been recognized by the United States government. The globalization of the digital world has introduced a new spectrum of risk management issues that affect the products exchanged by businesses and consumed by individuals and government agencies. While there have been some initiatives toward the promotion of tighter cybersecurity regulation, most initiatives only concern the public sector, leaving the private sector ...


Like A Bad Neighbor, Hackers Are There: The Need For Data Security Legislation And Cyber Insurance In Light Of Increasing Ftc Enforcement Actions, Jennifer Gordon 2016 Brooklyn Law School

Like A Bad Neighbor, Hackers Are There: The Need For Data Security Legislation And Cyber Insurance In Light Of Increasing Ftc Enforcement Actions, Jennifer Gordon

Brooklyn Journal of Corporate, Financial & Commercial Law

Privacy has come to the forefront of the technology world as third party hackers are constantly attacking companies for their customers’ data. With increasing instances of compromised customer information, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has been bringing suit against companies for inadequate data security procedures. The FTC’s newfound authority to bring suit regarding cybersecurity breaches, based on the Third Circuit’s decision in FTC v. Wyndham Worldwide Corp., is a result of inaction—Congress has been unable to pass sufficient cybersecurity legislation, causing the FTC to step in and fill the void in regulation. In the absence of congressional ...


“Hello…It’S Me. [Please Don’T Sue Me!]” Examining The Fcc’S Overbroad Calling Regulations Under The Tcpa, Marissa A. Potts 2016 Brooklyn Law School

“Hello…It’S Me. [Please Don’T Sue Me!]” Examining The Fcc’S Overbroad Calling Regulations Under The Tcpa, Marissa A. Potts

Brooklyn Law Review

Americans have received unwanted telemarketing calls for decades. In response to a rapid increase in pre-recorded calls made using autodialer devices, Congress enacted the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) in 1992. The TCPA imposes restrictions on calls made to consumers’ residences and wireless phones using autodialer devices, even if they are not telemarketing calls. Congress appointed the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to prescribe rules and regulations to enforce the TCPA. In 2015, the FCC released an order that defined autodialer more broadly under the statute. Consequently, devices that have the potential to become autodialers in the future, even if they ...


Can I Skype My Doctor? Limited Medicare Coverage Hinders Telemedicine’S Potential To Improve Health Care Access, Hana Sahdev 2016 Boston College Law School

Can I Skype My Doctor? Limited Medicare Coverage Hinders Telemedicine’S Potential To Improve Health Care Access, Hana Sahdev

Boston College Law Review

Telemedicine services, such as virtual consultations and remote patient monitoring, are revolutionizing health care delivery. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (“ACA”) promotes the use of technology in health care reform as a means to increase quality and access while reducing costs. Despite the excitement around telemedicine, the lack of Medicare reimbursement hinders access and innovation. This Note analyzes the utilization of telemedicine to promote health care access for Medicare beneficiaries, and argues that legislative and regulatory changes are needed to reconcile current Medicare policies with the ACA’s encouragement of using telemedicine services. Specifically, this Note ...


The Lawyer As Public Figure For First Amendment Purposes, Alex B. Long 2016 University of Tennessee College of Law

The Lawyer As Public Figure For First Amendment Purposes, Alex B. Long

Boston College Law Review

Should lawyers be treated as public figures for purposes of defamation claims and, therefore, be subjected to a higher evidentiary standard of actual malice under the Supreme Court’s decision in New York Times Co. v. Sullivan? The question of whether lawyers should be treated as public figures raises broad questions about the nature of defamation law and the legal profession. By examining the Supreme Court’s defamation jurisprudence through the lens of cases involving lawyers as plaintiffs, one can see the deficiencies and inconsistencies in the Court’s opinions more clearly. And by examining the Court’s defamation cases ...


“Time Works Changes”: Modernizing Fourth Amendment Law To Protect Cell Site Location Information, Alexander Porter 2016 Boston College Law School

“Time Works Changes”: Modernizing Fourth Amendment Law To Protect Cell Site Location Information, Alexander Porter

Boston College Law Review

In 2012, federal juries convicted two men of armed robbery based in part on historical cell site location information (“CSLI”) evidence. Historical CSLI can reproduce a person’s location with great specificity. Cell phone users generate CSLI automatically by operating their cellular phones. These facts raise serious privacy concerns. This Note argues that Congress must take action to ensure that law enforcement agents can access a suspect’s historical CSLI only after a neutral magistrate finds probable cause that a crime has been committed. Further, this Note argues that because cell phone users do not voluntarily convey CSLI to their ...


Should Youtube’S Content Id Be Liable For Misrepresentation Under The Digital Millennium Copyright Act?, Laura Zapata-Kim 2016 Boston College Law School

Should Youtube’S Content Id Be Liable For Misrepresentation Under The Digital Millennium Copyright Act?, Laura Zapata-Kim

Boston College Law Review

YouTube has quickly become the dominant player in the Internet video sharing platform market. To keep its leading position, it created an internal automated system to police potential copyright infringements known as Content ID. Generally, that system functions similarly to third-party computer automated systems that send takedown requests, yet it is exempt from liability for removing lawful videos under a safe harbor provided by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 (“DMCA”). Although some industry experts first championed Content ID, many now question whether it unfairly favors copyright holders and YouTube itself at the expense of content creators and the ...


Avoiding The Pitfalls Of Net Uniformity: Zero Rating And Nondiscrimination, Christopher S. Yoo 2016 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Avoiding The Pitfalls Of Net Uniformity: Zero Rating And Nondiscrimination, Christopher S. Yoo

Faculty Scholarship

The current debate over network neutrality has not fully appreciated how service differentiation can benefit consumers and promote Internet adoption. On the demand-side, service differentiation addresses the primary obstacle to adoption, which is the lack of perceived need for Internet service, and reflects the growing heterogeneity of consumer demand. On the supply-side, monopolistic competition has long underscored how product differentiation can create stable equilibria with multiple providers – notwithstanding the presence of unexhausted economies of scale – by allowing competitors to target subsegments of the overall market that place a higher value on particular services. Conversely, prohibiting service differentiation would restrict competition ...


Code Of Best Practices In Fair Use For The Visual Arts, Patricia Aufderheide, Peter Jaszi 2016 American University

Code Of Best Practices In Fair Use For The Visual Arts, Patricia Aufderheide, Peter Jaszi

Peter Jaszi

The mission of the College Art Association (CAA) is to promote the visual arts and their understanding through advocacy, intellectual engagement, and a commitment to the diversity of practices and practitioners. CAA contributes to the visual arts profession as a whole through scholarly publications, advocacy, exchange of research and new work, and the development of standards and guidelines that reflect the best practices of the field. The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts is based on a consensus of professionals in the visual arts who use copyrighted images, texts, and other materials in their creative ...


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