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3,017 full-text articles. Page 7 of 48.

Violating Of Individual Privacy: Moroccan Perceptions Of The Ban Of Voip Services, Tyler Delhees 2016 SIT Study Abroad

Violating Of Individual Privacy: Moroccan Perceptions Of The Ban Of Voip Services, Tyler Delhees

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

On January 6, 2016, the Moroccan telecommunications regulatory agency, the ANRT, announced a ban onVoice Over Internet Protocol(VoIP) calling services such as Skype, WhatsApp, and Viber. The ban triggered sweeping opposition among the Moroccan public, opening discussion of digital rights, censorship, and Internet governance. Considering liberal democratic rights in the 2011 Moroccan Constitution and a history of censorship, this study analyzes the official justification of the ANRT alongside additional explanations involving business interests and the security services. The purpose of this study is to gauge the perceptions of Moroccans on the decision of the ANRT and provide a holistic ...


The Silence After The Beep: Envisioning An Emergency Information System To Serve The Visually Impaired, Elana Reman 2016 Duke Law

The Silence After The Beep: Envisioning An Emergency Information System To Serve The Visually Impaired, Elana Reman

Duke Law & Technology Review

Due to a series of legal and regulatory setbacks, media accessibility regulations for consumers who are blind and visually impaired have lagged significantly behind those for deaf individuals. Until April 2014, when the Federal Communications Commission’s Emergency Information Order took effect, blind consumers were left “in the dark” when their safety mattered most—during weather emergencies—because visual emergency information displayed in the on-screen crawl during television programming was not accessible in an aural format. The Commission now mandates that this information be provided in an aural form through the secondary audio stream for linear programming viewed on televisions ...


The Fcc And The “Pre-Internet”, John Blevins 2016 Loyola University School of Law - New Orleans

The Fcc And The “Pre-Internet”, John Blevins

Indiana Law Journal

Network neutrality has dominated broadband policy debates for the past decade. While important, network neutrality overshadows other policy levers that are equally important to the goals of better, cheaper, and more open broadband service. This lack of perspective has historical precedent—and understanding this history can help refocus today’s policy debate. In the 1960s and 1970s, telephone companies threatened the growth of the nascent data industry. The FCC responded with a series of rulemakings known as the “Computer Inquiries” proceedings. In the literature, Computer Inquiries enjoys hallowed status as a key foundation of the Internet’s rise.

This Article ...


Net Neutrality’S Path To The Supreme Court: Chevron And The “Major Questions” Exception, Daniel A. Lyons 2016 Boston College Law School

Net Neutrality’S Path To The Supreme Court: Chevron And The “Major Questions” Exception, Daniel A. Lyons

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


How Should Courts Consider Agency Remarks During The Comment Period?, Daniel A. Lyons 2016 Boston College Law School

How Should Courts Consider Agency Remarks During The Comment Period?, Daniel A. Lyons

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


The Judicial Role In Extraterritorial Application Of The Securities Exchange Act Of 1934: Vesco, William A. Aileo 2016 University of Georgia School of Law

The Judicial Role In Extraterritorial Application Of The Securities Exchange Act Of 1934: Vesco, William A. Aileo

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Nlrb's Purple Communications Decision: Email, Property, And The Changing Patterns Of Industrial Life, Josh Carroll 2016 Duke Law

The Nlrb's Purple Communications Decision: Email, Property, And The Changing Patterns Of Industrial Life, Josh Carroll

Duke Law & Technology Review

On December 11th, 2014, in a much-anticipated case, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) held in a 3-2 decision that employees with access to an employer’s email system had a presumptive right to use that email system during non-working time under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”). In an attempt to adapt to the “changing patterns of industrial life,” the NLRB reversed a seven-year precedent by overturning In re Guard Publ'g Co., 351 N.L.R.B. 1110 (2007), and thereby gave employees the statutory right to use employer email systems for non-business purposes. This ...


The Freedom Of Speech In Public Forums On College Campuses: A Single-Site Case Study On Pushing The Boundaries Of The Freedom Of Speech, Alexander Davidson 2016 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

The Freedom Of Speech In Public Forums On College Campuses: A Single-Site Case Study On Pushing The Boundaries Of The Freedom Of Speech, Alexander Davidson

Journalism

The purpose of this single-site study is to test how far speech can be pushed before it is no longer protected at the California Polytechnic State University. The purpose isn’t merely to push limitations for the sake of testing boundaries, but it is to see what types of speech truly add to the marketplace of ideas and what types simply do not. The main points of the study are to understand what speech is protected and what speech is not protected on California Polytechnic State University’s campus and to understand how the provocation that comes along with “negative ...


Table Of Contents, 2016 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Table Of Contents

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Decrypting Our Security: A Bipartisan Argument For A Rational Solution To The Encryption Challenge, Jamil N. Jaffer, Daniel J. Rosenthal 2016 George Mason University Law School

Decrypting Our Security: A Bipartisan Argument For A Rational Solution To The Encryption Challenge, Jamil N. Jaffer, Daniel J. Rosenthal

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Baring All: Legal Ethics And Confidentiality Of Electronically Stored Information In The Cloud, Whitney Morgan 2016 Catholic University of America (Student)

Baring All: Legal Ethics And Confidentiality Of Electronically Stored Information In The Cloud, Whitney Morgan

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Exporting Internet Law Through International Trade Agreements: Recalibrating U.S. Trade Policy In The Digital Age, Markham C. Erickson, Sarah K. Leggin 2016 Steptoe & Johnson LLP

Exporting Internet Law Through International Trade Agreements: Recalibrating U.S. Trade Policy In The Digital Age, Markham C. Erickson, Sarah K. Leggin

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Masthead, 2016 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Masthead

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


The Connected State Of Things: A Lawyer’S Survival Guide In An Internet Of Things World, Antigone Peyton 2016 Cloudigy Law PLLC

The Connected State Of Things: A Lawyer’S Survival Guide In An Internet Of Things World, Antigone Peyton

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


United States Media Law Update, Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky, Rachael Jones 2016 University of Florida Levin College of Law

United States Media Law Update, Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky, Rachael Jones

Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky

In June 2015 the United States Supreme Court completed what was hailed as its most ‘liberal term of the ages’, issuing major decisions on controversial issues, such as same-sex marriage, affirmative action and the Affordable Care Act. The Court’s free press jurisprudence, however, remained largely unchanged after its last term. The Court did not decide any significant press cases. Instead, the Court sidestepped the opportunity to resolve important questions about the constitutional limits on the prosecution of threats made via social media in one notable case, and set a new, more speech-protective standard for determining when a law is ...


The Law Of Outer Space, Robert E. Clute 2016 University of Georgia

The Law Of Outer Space, Robert E. Clute

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Patent Trolls And The Path To Reform, Eric J. Abram 2016 Brigham Young University

Patent Trolls And The Path To Reform, Eric J. Abram

Brigham Young University Prelaw Review

No abstract provided.


The Right To Attention, Jasper L. Tran 2016 George Mason University

The Right To Attention, Jasper L. Tran

Indiana Law Journal

What marketing, contracts, and healthcare—specifically informed consent and mandatory ultrasounds—have in common is the right to attention from the information receiver. However, scholarship most often focuses on the communicator’s perspective (e.g., how much information the communicator discloses) or on the information itself, but surprisingly, not much on the receiver’s perspective.

This dearth of scholarship from the information receiver’s perspective is problematic, because the information receiver is often the “little guy” in the conversation. We own and are entitled to our attention because attention is a property right and part of our individual dignity. Yet ...


Saving The Internet: Why Regulating Broadband Providers Can Keep The Internet Open, Emma N. Cano 2016 Brigham Young University Law School

Saving The Internet: Why Regulating Broadband Providers Can Keep The Internet Open, Emma N. Cano

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Unpacking The Dirtbox: Confronting Cell Phone Location Tracking With The Fourth Amendment, Jonathan Bard 2016 Boston College Law School

Unpacking The Dirtbox: Confronting Cell Phone Location Tracking With The Fourth Amendment, Jonathan Bard

Boston College Law Review

Surveillance technology has raced ahead of the Fourth Amendment, forcing courts to confront high-tech intrusions with rusty jurisprudence. The Dirtbox, an airborne cell-site simulator, allows the government to sweep entire cities and intercept individuals’ cell phone location information without relying on cooperative intermediaries. This Note argues that the government’s use of the Dirtbox and other cell-site simulators amounts to a Fourth Amendment search because it may pinpoint individuals within a constitutionally protected space. Although the Department of Justice issued policy guidelines requiring its agents to obtain a search warrant before using this device, this narrow and unenforceable protocol fails ...


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