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4,466 full-text articles. Page 7 of 98.

The On-Sale Bar After Pfaff, William E. Hickman, Michelle Saquet Temple 2017 University of Oklahoma College of Law

The On-Sale Bar After Pfaff, William E. Hickman, Michelle Saquet Temple

Oklahoma Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Attorney-Client Privilege In Patent Litigation: In Re Spalding Sports Worldwide, Matt Rodgers 2017 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Attorney-Client Privilege In Patent Litigation: In Re Spalding Sports Worldwide, Matt Rodgers

Oklahoma Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Open Source: The Enewsletter Of Rwu Law 09-22-2017, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

Open Source: The Enewsletter Of Rwu Law 09-22-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Rethinking Judicial Review Of High Volume Agency Adjudication, Jonah B. Gelbach, David Marcus 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Rethinking Judicial Review Of High Volume Agency Adjudication, Jonah B. Gelbach, David Marcus

Faculty Scholarship

Article III courts annually review thousands of decisions rendered by Social Security Administrative Law Judges, Immigration Judges, and other agency adjudicators who decide large numbers of cases in short periods of time. Federal judges can provide a claim for disability benefits or for immigration relief the sort of consideration that an agency buckling under the strain of enormous caseloads cannot. Judicial review thus seems to help legitimize systems of high volume agency adjudication. Even so, influential studies rooted in the gritty realities of this decision-making have concluded that the costs of judicial review outweigh whatever benefits the process creates.

We ...


Current Litigation, William B. Ball, Esq. 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Current Litigation, William B. Ball, Esq.

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Maybe There's No Bias In The Selection Of Disputes For Litigation, Eric Helland, Daniel M. Klerman, Yoon-Ho Alex Lee 2017 Claremont McKenna College

Maybe There's No Bias In The Selection Of Disputes For Litigation, Eric Helland, Daniel M. Klerman, Yoon-Ho Alex Lee

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

New York “closing statement” data provide unique insight into settlement and selection. The distributions of settlements and adjudicated damages are remarkably similar, and the average settlement is very close to the average judgment. One interpretation is that selection effects may be small or non-existent. Because existing litigation models all predict selection bias, we develop a simple, no-selection-bias model that is consistent with the data. Nevertheless, we show that the data can also be explained by generalized versions of screening, signaling, and Priest-Klein models.


Esea Title I Litigation - Update, Charles H. Wilson, Esq., Williams & Connolly, Washington, D.C. 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Esea Title I Litigation - Update, Charles H. Wilson, Esq., Williams & Connolly, Washington, D.C.

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Adapting To The Changing World Of Biotechnology: Syngenta Ag Mir162 Corn Litigation As Regulation By Litigation, Paul Goeringer 2017 Texas A&M University School of Law

Adapting To The Changing World Of Biotechnology: Syngenta Ag Mir162 Corn Litigation As Regulation By Litigation, Paul Goeringer

Texas A&M Law Review

Agriculture has relied on plant breeding to improve genetics since the first domestication of agricultural plants 10,000 years ago. More recently, Gregor Mendel and his hybridization experiments on peas led to what we know as modern genetics. The rise in recombinantDNA technology has opened up many possibilities in plant breeding, including Roundup Ready technology and crop varieties designed to resist a number of pests. At the same time, governments and the private sector have sought to institute regulations for handling the releases of new biotechnology to ensure the technologies will have limited environmental impacts and provide safe foods to ...


Mass Torts—Maturation Of Law And Practice, Paul D. Rheingold 2017 Pace University

Mass Torts—Maturation Of Law And Practice, Paul D. Rheingold

Pace Law Review

Mass tort litigation has been with us for about fifty years. This is dating the start from the MER/29 litigation in 1964. This field of law and practice has grown year after year, and it shows no sign of abating. At the same time, it can be said that this area of law and procedure has reached a mature stage; the practice is fairly standardized and earlier experiments have either become the model or have been abandoned.

The term “mass tort litigation” (MTL), as used in this article, confines itself to product liability personal injury cases involving similar injuries ...


Repeat Players In Multidistrict Litigation: The Social Network, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch, Margaret S. Williams 2017 University of Georgia Law School

Repeat Players In Multidistrict Litigation: The Social Network, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch, Margaret S. Williams

Cornell Law Review

As class certification wanes, plaintiffs’ lawyers resolve hundreds of thousands of individual lawsuits through aggregate settlements in multidistrict litigation. But without class actions, formal rules are scarce and judges rarely scrutinize the private agreements that result. Meanwhile, the same principal- agent concerns that plagued class-action attorneys linger. These circumstances are ripe for exploitation: few rules, little oversight, multi-million dollar common-benefit fees, and a push for settlement can tempt a cadre of repeat players to fill in the gaps in ways that further their own self-interest. Although multidistrict litigation now comprises 36% of the pending federal civil caseload, legal scholars have ...


Judge Kozinski Objects, Beth H. Wilensky 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Judge Kozinski Objects, Beth H. Wilensky

Articles

Sitting judges don’t get to practice law. So although they often opine on the dos and don’ts of effective advocacy, we rarely get to see them put their advice into practice. But a few years ago, a class-action lawsuit provided the rare opportunity to witness a federal judge acting as an advocate before another federal judge—if not in the role of attorney, then certainly in as close to that role as we are likely to see. Given the chance to employ his own advice about effective advocacy, would the judge—Alex Kozinski—practice what he preaches? Would ...


Acciones De Clase, “Microdaños” A Los Consumidores Y Fluid Recovery: Alternativas Institucionales Y Costos Sociales, Pamela Tolosa 2017 ALACDE

Acciones De Clase, “Microdaños” A Los Consumidores Y Fluid Recovery: Alternativas Institucionales Y Costos Sociales, Pamela Tolosa

The Latin American and Iberian Journal of Law and Economics

Usually, class actions have advantages in dealing with negative expected-value claims by consumers —when the expected cost of claiming exceeds the expected benefits of doing so—. In those cases, it is assumed that affected consumers do not have incentives to sue. Consequently, class action can be seen as a device to internalize the social costs of harms caused to consumers. Nevertheless, in order to achieve such a goal, the condemnatory sentence or the settlement agreement must be effectively enforced. In that stage of proceedings, the lack of incentives for claiming consumer damages is frequent. Fluid recovery or cy prés mechanims ...


The Aftermath Of Care V. Cow Palace And The Future Of Rcra In Cafo Cases, Lauren Tavar 2017 American University Washington College of Law

The Aftermath Of Care V. Cow Palace And The Future Of Rcra In Cafo Cases, Lauren Tavar

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Water, Water, Nowhere: Adapting Water Rights For A Changing Climate, Caleb Hall 2017 American University Washington College of Law

Water, Water, Nowhere: Adapting Water Rights For A Changing Climate, Caleb Hall

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Ridding Pes Systems Of The “Pay To Pollute” Principle: Pes Optimization Strategies, Kelly Carlson 2017 American University Washington College of Law

Ridding Pes Systems Of The “Pay To Pollute” Principle: Pes Optimization Strategies, Kelly Carlson

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Indoor Aquaponics In Abandoned Buildings: A Potential Solution To Food Deserts, Lisa Tomlinson 2017 American University Washington College of Law

Indoor Aquaponics In Abandoned Buildings: A Potential Solution To Food Deserts, Lisa Tomlinson

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Investing In Resiliency: Prioritizing Water Systems And Investing In Green Infrastructure, Caitlin Cutchin 2017 American University Washington College of Law

Investing In Resiliency: Prioritizing Water Systems And Investing In Green Infrastructure, Caitlin Cutchin

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


You Probably Shouldn’T Build There: Watershed-Based Land Use Strategies For Mitigating Global Climate Change In New Jersey’S Freshwater Systems, Matthew Knoblauch 2017 American University Washington College of Law

You Probably Shouldn’T Build There: Watershed-Based Land Use Strategies For Mitigating Global Climate Change In New Jersey’S Freshwater Systems, Matthew Knoblauch

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


About Sdlp, 2017 American University Washington College of Law

About Sdlp

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Rjr Nabisco And The Runaway Canon, Maggie Gardner 2017 Cornell Law School

Rjr Nabisco And The Runaway Canon, Maggie Gardner

Maggie Gardner

In last Term’s RJR Nabisco, Inc. v. European Community, the Court finished transforming the presumption against extraterritoriality from a tool meant to effectuate congressional intent into a tool for keeping Congress in check. In the hands of the RJR Nabisco majority, the presumption has become less a method for interpreting statutes than a pronouncement on the proper scope of access to U.S. courts, a pronouncement that Congress must labor to displace. Besides the worrisome implications for separation of powers, the majority’s opinion was also disappointing on practical grounds. By applying the presumption too aggressively, the Court missed ...


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