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Internationalizing And Historicizing Hart’S Theory Of Law, Norman P. Ho 2018 Peking University School of Transnational Law

Internationalizing And Historicizing Hart’S Theory Of Law, Norman P. Ho

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

In The Concept of Law – which continues to enjoy the central position in the field of analytical jurisprudence five decades after its initial publication – H.L.A. Hart makes two powerful claims. He argues that his theory of law is universal (in that it can apply to any legal culture) and timeless (in that it can apply to different times in history). Despite the sweeping, bold nature of these claims, neither Hart nor the large body of scholarship that has responded to, criticized, and refined Hart’s model of law over the past few decades has really tested whether Hart ...


Dworkin's Incomplete Interpretation Of Democracy, Alexander Latham 2018 Swansea University

Dworkin's Incomplete Interpretation Of Democracy, Alexander Latham

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

This essay mounts an immanent critique of Dworkin’s defense of judicial review. Taking Dworkin’s methodology of constructive interpretation as my starting point, I argue that when analyzing the role that political institutions play in democracy, Dworkin fails to take his own method far enough. In particular, he limits his constructive interpretation of democracy to the practice of voting, overlooking the distinctive democratic values implicit within the institutions and practices of legislation by representative assembly. Ironically, given his well-known critique of majoritarian democracy, this failure leads Dworkin to adopt majoritarianism as a starting point when assessing particular institutions. A ...


High Priorities: Land Use, Marijuana, And Meta-Values, Spenser Owens 2018 Washington University in St. Louis

High Priorities: Land Use, Marijuana, And Meta-Values, Spenser Owens

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

This Note will examine the motivations surrounding the adoption of zoning ordinances pertaining to the production and sale of marijuana through the lens of John Dewey’s theory of valuation. Applying Dewey’s theory to the zoning ordinances of a sampling of state and local governments, I will argue first that the choice of land uses to be regulated and restricted through local zoning ordinances is ultimately referable to values held by the community in which the ordinances are enacted. Second, I will argue that the decisions made on the state level carry more “value” as defined by Dewey’s ...


Freedom And Affordances Of The Net, Christoph B. Graber 2018 Universtity of Zurich, Faculty of Law

Freedom And Affordances Of The Net, Christoph B. Graber

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

This Article is about the relationship between technology and society in fundamental rights theory. So far, the discussion about law and technology has generally been one-directional within the most relevant branches of the social sciences; scholars of the law have been treating technology as a black box when conducting their analyses or developing their theories. In turn, science and technology studies have considered law and regulation as a closed book, which is unsatisfactory as well. Reductionist and compartmentalized theorizing is particularly problematic when it comes to conceiving a fundamental rights theory that is able to cope with challenges of the ...


A Historical Reassessment Of Congress's "Power To Dispose Of" The Public Lands, Jeffrey M. Schmitt 2018 University of Dayton

A Historical Reassessment Of Congress's "Power To Dispose Of" The Public Lands, Jeffrey M. Schmitt

School of Law Faculty Publications

The Property Clause of the Constitution grants Congress the “Power to Dispose” of federal land. Congress uses this Clause to justify permanent federal land ownership of approximately one-third of the land within the United States. Legal scholars, however, are divided as to whether the original understanding of the Clause supports this practice. While many scholars argue that the text and intent of the framers show that Congress has the power to permanently own land within the states, others contend that these sources demonstrate that Congress has a duty to dispose of all federal land not held pursuant to another enumerated ...


Dorothy Moser Medlin Papers - Accession 1049, Dorothy Moser Medlin 2018 Winthrop University

Dorothy Moser Medlin Papers - Accession 1049, Dorothy Moser Medlin

Manuscript Collection

(The Dorothy Moser Medlin Papers are currently in processing.)

This collection contains most of the records of Dorothy Medlin’s work and correspondence and also includes reference materials, notes, microfilm, photographic negatives related both to her professional and personal life. Additions include a FLES Handbook, co-authored by Dorothy Medlin and a decorative mirror belonging to Dorothy Medlin.

Major series in this collection include: some original 18th century writings and ephemera and primary source material of André Morellet, extensive collection of secondary material on André Morellet's writings and translations, Winthrop related files, literary manuscripts and notes by Dorothy Medlin (1966-2011 ...


Petitioning And The Making Of The Administrative State, Maggie McKinley 2018 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Petitioning And The Making Of The Administrative State, Maggie Mckinley

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The administrative state is suffering from a crisis of legitimacy. Many have questioned the legality of the myriad commissions, boards, and agencies through which much of our modern governance occurs. Scholars such as Jerry Mashaw, Theda Skocpol, and Michele Dauber, among others, have provided compelling institutional histories, illustrating that administrative lawmaking has roots in the early American republic. Others have attempted to assuage concerns through interpretive theory, arguing that the Administrative Procedure Act of 1946 implicitly amended our Constitution. Solutions offered thus far, however, have yet to provide a deeper understanding of the meaning and function of the administrative state ...


The Loving Story: Using A Documentary To Reconsider The Status Of An Iconic Interracial Married Couple, Regina Austin 2018 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Loving Story: Using A Documentary To Reconsider The Status Of An Iconic Interracial Married Couple, Regina Austin

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The Loving Story (Augusta Films 2011), directed by Nancy Buirski, tells the backstory of the groundbreaking U.S. Supreme Court case, Loving v. Virginia, that overturned state laws barring interracial marriage. The article looks to the documentary to explain why the Lovings should be considered icons of racial and ethnic civil rights, however much they might be associated with marriage equality today. The film shows the Lovings to be ordinary people who took their nearly decade long struggle against white supremacy to the nation’s highest court out of a genuine commitment to each other and a determination to live ...


Progressive Antitrust, Herbert J. Hovenkamp 2018 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Progressive Antitrust, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Several American political candidates and administrations have both run and served under the “progressive” banner for more than a century, right through the 2016 election season. For the most part these have pursued interventionist antitrust policies, reflecting a belief that markets are fragile and in need of repair, that certain interest groups require greater protection, or in some cases that antitrust policy is an extended arm of regulation. This paper argues that most of this progressive antitrust policy was misconceived, including that reflected in the 2016 antitrust plank of the Democratic Party. The progressive state is best served by a ...


The Rule Of Reason, Herbert J. Hovenkamp 2018 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Rule Of Reason, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Antitrust’s rule of reason was born out of a thirty-year (1897-1927) division among Supreme Court Justices about the proper way to assess multi-firm restraints on competition. By the late 1920s the basic contours of the rule for restraints among competitors was roughly established. Antitrust policy toward vertical restraints remained much more unstable, however, largely because their effects were so poorly understood.

This article provides a litigation field guide for antitrust claims under the rule of reason – or more precisely, for situations when application of the rule of reason is likely. At the time pleadings are drafted and even up ...


Reasonable Patent Exhaustion, Herbert J. Hovenkamp 2018 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Reasonable Patent Exhaustion, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

A lengthy tug of war between the Supreme Court and the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals may have ended when the Supreme Court held that the sale of a patented article exhausts the patentee seller’s rights to enforce restrictions on that article through patent infringement suits. Further, reversing the Federal Circuit, the parties cannot bargain around this rule through the seller’s specification of conditions stated at the time of sale, no matter how clear. No inquiry need be made into the patentee’s market power, anticompetitive effects, or other types of harms, whether enforcement of the condition is ...


Table Of Contents, 2018 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Table Of Contents

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Foreword: Benjamin N. Cardozo: Judge, Justice, Scholar, Samuel J. Levine 2018 Touro Law Center

Foreword: Benjamin N. Cardozo: Judge, Justice, Scholar, Samuel J. Levine

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Benjamin Cardozo And The Death Of The Common Law, John C. P. Goldberg 2018 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Benjamin Cardozo And The Death Of The Common Law, John C. P. Goldberg

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Cardozo And The Civil Jury, Michael D. Green, Ashley DiMuzio 2018 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Cardozo And The Civil Jury, Michael D. Green, Ashley Dimuzio

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Justice Cardozo’S The Nature Of The Judicial Process: A Case Study, Judge Kermit V. Lipez 2018 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Justice Cardozo’S The Nature Of The Judicial Process: A Case Study, Judge Kermit V. Lipez

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Cardozo, The Canon And Some Critical Thoughts About Pedagogy, Deborah W. Post 2018 Touro Law Center

Cardozo, The Canon And Some Critical Thoughts About Pedagogy, Deborah W. Post

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Cardozo, Andrew L. Kaufman 2018 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Cardozo, Andrew L. Kaufman

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Innovation Diffusion In The Legal Industry, William D. Henderson 2018 Indiana University, Maurer School of Law

Innovation Diffusion In The Legal Industry, William D. Henderson

Dickinson Law Review

This article is adapted from a series of blog posts originally found in my recently-started blog entitled Legal Evolution. The foundational material set forth in this article (and in those blog posts) applies to the legal services market insights gained from disciplines other than law. This article begins by setting forth the well-established theory of an “innovation diffusion curve” and the research that has identified the factors that affect the rate of adoption of innovations. This article identifies why innovation in the legal services market is desirable and applies to the legal services field insights drawn from this research in ...


The First Queer Right, Scott Skinner-Thompson 2018 University of Colorado Law School

The First Queer Right, Scott Skinner-Thompson

Articles

Current legal disputes may lead one to believe that the greatest threat to LGBTQ rights is the First Amendment’s protections for speech, association, and religion, which are currently being mustered to challenge LGBTQ anti-discrimination protections. But underappreciated today is the role of free speech and free association in advancing the well-being of LGBTQ individuals, as explained in Professor Carlos Ball’s important new book, The First Amendment and LGBT Equality: A Contentious History. In many ways the First Amendment’s protections for free expression and association operated as what I label “the first queer right.”

Decades before the Supreme ...


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