Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Jurisprudence Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

6,972 Full-Text Articles 4,309 Authors 3,626,198 Downloads 154 Institutions

All Articles in Jurisprudence

Faceted Search

6,972 full-text articles. Page 6 of 160.

Rescuing Maryland Tort Law: A Tribute To Judge Sally Adkins, Donald G. Gifford 2019 University of Maryland School of Law

Rescuing Maryland Tort Law: A Tribute To Judge Sally Adkins, Donald G. Gifford

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Face Off: An Examination Of State Biometric Privacy Statutes & Data Harm Remedies, Michael A. Rivera 2019 Fordham University School of Law

Face Off: An Examination Of State Biometric Privacy Statutes & Data Harm Remedies, Michael A. Rivera

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

As biometric authentication becomes an increasingly popular method of security among consumers, only three states currently have statutes detailing how such data may be collected, used, retained, and released. The Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act is the only statute of the three that enshrines a private right of action for those who fail to properly handle biometric data. Both the Texas Capture or Use Biometric Identifier Act Information Act and the Washington Biometric Privacy Act allow for state Attorneys General to bring suit on behalf of aggrieved consumers. This Note examines these three statutes in the context of data security ...


Towards A Jurisprudence Of Fashion, Susan Scafidi 2019 Fordham University School of Law

Towards A Jurisprudence Of Fashion, Susan Scafidi

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Human Rights Racism, Anna Spain Bradley 2019 University of Colorado Law School

Human Rights Racism, Anna Spain Bradley

Articles

International human rights law seeks to eliminate racial discrimination in the world through treaties that bind and norms that transform. Yet law’s impact on eradicating racism has not matched its intent. Racism, in all of its forms, remains a massive cause of discrimination, indignity, and lack of equality for millions of people in the world today. This Article investigates why. Applying a critical race theory analysis of the legal history and doctrinal development of race and racism in international law, Professor Spain Bradley identifies law’s historical preference for framing legal protections around the concept of racial discrimination. She ...


Efectos De La Política Montearía En Colombia A Través Del Mecanismo De Transmisión Del Crédito Bancario Sobre La Inflación En El Periodo 2001 A 2015., Diego Andrés Contreras Rodríguez 2019 Universidad de La Salle, Bogotá

Efectos De La Política Montearía En Colombia A Través Del Mecanismo De Transmisión Del Crédito Bancario Sobre La Inflación En El Periodo 2001 A 2015., Diego Andrés Contreras Rodríguez

Economía

El presente trabajo se elaboró con el propósito de identificar la influencia que tuvo la política monetaria sobre la inflación, a través del mecanismo de transmisión del crédito bancario, teniendo en cuenta la evolución que registró, los depósitos que recibió y los préstamos que otorgó el sistema financiero al público, por medio de los bancos comerciales, a partir del 2001, año donde el banco central implementó una nueva estrategia monetaria con los objetivos de mantener una estabilidad en los precios y un crecimiento alto y sostenible del producto. En el análisis, se presentan los cambios en la postura monetaria, mediante ...


Mcculloch V. Marbury, Kermit Roosevelt III, Heath Khan 2019 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Mcculloch V. Marbury, Kermit Roosevelt Iii, Heath Khan

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This article builds on recent scholarship about the origins and creation of “our Marbury”—the contemporary understanding of the case and its significance—to argue that Marbury is in fact wholly unsuited for the role it plays in Supreme Court rhetoric and academic instruction. While Marbury is generally understood to support aggressive judicial review, or actual invalidation of a government act, it offers no guidance at all for how judicial review should be employed in particular cases—in particular, whether review should be aggressive or deferential. The actual opinion in Marbury makes no effort to justify its lack of deference ...


The Influence Of The Warren Court And Natural Rights On Substantive Due Process, James Marmaduke 2019 University of Nevada, Las Vegas

The Influence Of The Warren Court And Natural Rights On Substantive Due Process, James Marmaduke

Calvert Undergraduate Research Awards

Advanced Research Winner 2019:

While the concept of substantive due process has guided judicial decision making even prior to the Civil War, it has become a lightning rod among the juristic community especially since the 1960s. This controversy includes issues ranging from the applicability and reliability to the cogency and legitimacy of the doctrine of substantive due process Many scholars attribute the skepticism toward the concept of substantive due process to be the result of a paradigm shift in the middle of the 20th century when this concept transitioned from an economic and property rights based approach to one ...


Overwriting And Under-Deciding: Addressing The Roberts Court's Shrinking Docket, Meg Penrose 2019 Texas A&M University School of Law

Overwriting And Under-Deciding: Addressing The Roberts Court's Shrinking Docket, Meg Penrose

Faculty Scholarship

How do we evaluate a Supreme Court that writes more than it decides? Despite having the lowest decisional output in the modern era, the Roberts Court is the most verbose Supreme Court in history. The current Justices are more likely than past Justices to have their individual say in cases, writing more concurring and dissenting opinions than prior Courts. These opinions are longer, often strongly worded, and rarely add clarity to the underlying decision. The Roberts Court has shifted from being a decisional body to becoming an institution that comments on more cases than it decides.

This article critiques the ...


Contracts, Constitutions, And Getting The Interpretation-Construction Distinction Right, Gregory Klass 2019 Georgetown University Law Center

Contracts, Constitutions, And Getting The Interpretation-Construction Distinction Right, Gregory Klass

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Interpretation determines the meaning of a legal actor’s words or other significant acts, construction their legal effect. Using contract law and then two nineteenth century theories of constitutional interpretation as examples, this Article advances four claims about interpretation, construction, and the relationship between the two. First, many theorists, following Francis Lieber, assume that rules of construction apply only when interpretation runs out, such as when a text’s meaning is ambiguous or does not address an issue. In fact, a rule of construction is always necessary to determine a legal speech act’s effect, including when its meaning is ...


The Declaration Of Independence And The American Theory Of Government: “First Come Rights, And Then Comes Government”, Randy E. Barnett 2019 Georgetown University Law Center

The Declaration Of Independence And The American Theory Of Government: “First Come Rights, And Then Comes Government”, Randy E. Barnett

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The topic of this panel is the Declaration of Independence, to which I devoted a chapter of my recent book, Our Republican Constitution. I want to draw on that book to make five points.


All Balls And No Strikes: The Roberts Court’S Anti-Worker Activism, J. Maria Glover 2019 Georgetown University Law Center

All Balls And No Strikes: The Roberts Court’S Anti-Worker Activism, J. Maria Glover

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

For decades, legislatures and courts have created and preserved rights and remedies for vulnerable groups—consumers, employees, victims of mass torts, investors, and the like. Both branches have extolled the virtues of these substantive rights and the private enforcement mechanisms required to effectuate them. However, despite statements like that of Justice Roberts and others that the judiciary is not a lawmaking body—indeed, that the judicial institution should take care to exercise restraint—the Roberts Court has engaged in sweeping reform that tends to extinguish these substantive rights.

In 2012, I traced how the Roberts Court paid scant attention to ...


Constructing More Reliable Law And Policy: The Potential Benefits Of The Underused Delphi Method, Juan Bataller-Grau, Elies Segui-Mas, Javier Vercher-Moll, Jeffrey W. Stempel 2019 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Constructing More Reliable Law And Policy: The Potential Benefits Of The Underused Delphi Method, Juan Bataller-Grau, Elies Segui-Mas, Javier Vercher-Moll, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Law has long aspired to achieve status as a science. A central theme of much legal philosophy has been the quest for legal doctrine to become more like scientific axioms or findings produced through a scientific inquiry. Considerable debate has surrounded the issue. Part of the legal profession sees the question of law's science status as doomed to failure and regards law as a distinct type of discipline. Others in the legal profession are attracted to the aspiration but express doubt regarding whether the methods that the legal doctrine has traditionally employed can achieve the greater apparent rigor of ...


Redepaz Y La Cooperación Descentralizada En La Construcción De La Paz Sostenible, Carlos Mario Muñoz Sánchez 2019 Universidad de La Salle, Bogotá

Redepaz Y La Cooperación Descentralizada En La Construcción De La Paz Sostenible, Carlos Mario Muñoz Sánchez

Negocios y Relaciones Internacionales

La Red Nacional de Iniciativas Ciudadanas por la Paz y contra la Guerra (REDEPAZ) trabaja en áreas de construcción de paz tales como: consenso por la paz, defensa y protección de la población civil, mujer y género, y territorialidad por la paz. En este sentido, la organización ha orientado su trabajo en establecer la paz negativa y positiva. Asimismo, la red ha utilizado la cooperación internacional, particularmente, la Cooperación Descentralizada (CD), para articular su discurso alrededor de los enfoques de la paz con el fin de formular y ejecutar proyectos. Sin embargo, en cuanto a la construcción de la paz ...


Mens Rea Reform And Its Discontents, Benjamin Levin 2019 University of Colorado Law School

Mens Rea Reform And Its Discontents, Benjamin Levin

Articles

This Article examines the debates over recent proposals for “mens rea reform.” The substantive criminal law has expanded dramatically, and legislators have criminalized a great deal of common conduct. Often, new criminal laws do not require that defendants know they are acting unlawfully. Mens rea reform proposals seek to address the problems of overcriminalization and unintentional offending by increasing the burden on prosecutors to prove a defendant’s culpable mental state. These proposals have been a staple of conservative-backed bills on criminal justice reform. Many on the left remain skeptical of mens rea reform and view it as a deregulatory ...


Originalism And The Law Of The Past, William Baude, Stephen E. Sachs 2019 Duke Law School

Originalism And The Law Of The Past, William Baude, Stephen E. Sachs

Faculty Scholarship

Originalism has long been criticized for its “law office history” and other historical sins. But a recent “positive turn” in originalist thought may help make peace between history and law. On this theory, originalism is best understood as a claim about our modern law — which borrows many of its rules, constitutional or otherwise, from the law of the past. Our law happens to be the Founders’ law, unless lawfully changed.

This theory has three important implications for the role of history in law. First, whether and how past law matters today is a question of current law, not of history ...


Grounding Originalism, William Baude, Stephen E. Sachs 2019 Duke Law School

Grounding Originalism, William Baude, Stephen E. Sachs

Faculty Scholarship

How should we interpret the Constitution? The “positive turn” in legal scholarship treats constitutional interpretation, like the interpretation of statutes or contracts, as governed by legal rules grounded in actual practice. In our legal system, that practice requires a certain form of originalism: our system’s official story is that we follow the law of the Founding, plus all lawful changes made since.

Or so we’ve argued. Yet this answer produces its own set of questions. How can practice solve our problems, when there are so many theories of law, each giving practice a different role? Why look to ...


Finding Law, Stephen E. Sachs 2019 Duke Law School

Finding Law, Stephen E. Sachs

Faculty Scholarship

That the judge's task is to find the law, not to make it, was once a commonplace of our legal culture. Today, decades after Erie, the idea of a common law discovered by judges is commonly dismissed -- as a "fallacy," an "illusion," a "brooding omnipresence in the sky." That dismissive view is wrong. Expecting judges to find unwritten law is no childish fiction of the benighted past, but a real and plausible option for a modern legal system.

This Essay seeks to restore the respectability of finding law, in part by responding to two criticisms made by Erie and ...


A Theory Of Poverty: Legal Immobility, Sara Sternberg Greene 2019 Duke Law School

A Theory Of Poverty: Legal Immobility, Sara Sternberg Greene

Faculty Scholarship

The puzzle of why the cycle of poverty persists and upward class mobility is so difficult for the poor has long captivated scholars and the public alike. Yet with all of the attention that has been paid to poverty, the crucial role of the law, particularly state and local law, in perpetuating poverty is largely ignored. This Article offers a new theory of poverty, one that introduces the concept of legal immobility. Legal immobility considers the cumulative effects of state and local laws as a mechanism through which poverty is perpetuated and upward mobility is stunted. The Article provides an ...


The Political Party System As A Public Forum: The Incoherence Of Parties As Free Speech Associations And A Proposed Correction, Wayne Batchis 2019 University of Delaware

The Political Party System As A Public Forum: The Incoherence Of Parties As Free Speech Associations And A Proposed Correction, Wayne Batchis

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The Supreme Court’s jurisprudence addressing the associational rights of political parties is both highly consequential and deeply inconsistent. It dates back at least as far as the Court’s White Primary decisions more than a half-century ago. In recent decades, the Court has imposed an arguably ad hoc formula, striking down regulations on political parties on First Amendment grounds in some cases, while upholding them in others. From a jurisprudential perspective, critics might point to insufficiently principled distinctions between these cases. From a normative perspective, the very expansion of First Amendment rights to political parties, like the parallel extension ...


Sex Wars As Proxy Wars, Aya Gruber 2019 University of Colorado Law School

Sex Wars As Proxy Wars, Aya Gruber

Articles

The clash between feminists and queer theorists over the meaning of sex—danger versus pleasure—is well- trodden academic territory. Less discussed is what the theories have in common. There is an important presumption uniting many feminist and queer accounts of sexuality: sex, relative to all other human activities, is something of great, or grave, importance. The theories reflect Gayle Rubin’s postulation that "everything pertaining to sex has been a ‘special case’ in our culture.” In the #MeToo era, we can see all too clearly how sex has an outsized influence in public debate. Raging against sexual harm has ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress