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What Caused The 2016 Chicago Homicide Spike? An Empirical Examination Of The 'Aclu Effect' And The Role Of Stop And Frisks In Preventing Gun Violence, Paul Cassell, Richard Fowles 2018 S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah

What Caused The 2016 Chicago Homicide Spike? An Empirical Examination Of The 'Aclu Effect' And The Role Of Stop And Frisks In Preventing Gun Violence, Paul Cassell, Richard Fowles

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

Homicides increased dramatically in Chicago in 2016. In 2015, 480 Chicago residents were killed. The next year, 754 were killed–274 more homicide victims, tragically producing an extraordinary 58% increase in a single year. This article attempts to unravel what happened.

This article provides empirical evidence that the reduction in stop and frisks by the Chicago Police Department beginning around December 2015 was responsible for the homicide spike that started immediately thereafter. The sharp decline in the number of stop and frisks is a strong candidate for the causal factor, particularly since the timing of the homicide spike so perfectly ...


Getting It Righted: Access To Counsel In Rapid Removals, Stephen Manning, Kari Hong 2018 Marquette University Law School

Getting It Righted: Access To Counsel In Rapid Removals, Stephen Manning, Kari Hong

Marquette Law Review

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International Human Rights Law: An Unexpected Threat To Peace, Ingrid Wuerth 2018 Marquette University Law School

International Human Rights Law: An Unexpected Threat To Peace, Ingrid Wuerth

Marquette Law Review

None


Rendition In Extraordinary Times, Margaret L. Satterthwaite, Alexandra M. Zetes 2018 NYU School of Law

Rendition In Extraordinary Times, Margaret L. Satterthwaite, Alexandra M. Zetes

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

The practice of rendition—the involuntary transfer of an individual across borders without recourse to extradition or deportation proceedings—is not new. Indeed, the practice of snatching a defendant for trial—“rendition to justice”—has been used by governments for more than a century. Although rendition has been controversial in human rights circles, it has been celebrated by many as crucial in the fight against impunity for grave crimes. Former U.S. President George W. Bush was criticized for the “novel” practice of “extraordinary rendition”—the transfer of suspects to locations known for the systematic use of torture, including secret ...


Serving Pets In Poverty: A New Frontier For The Animal Welfare Movement, Amanda Arrington, Michael Markarian 2018 American University Washington College of Law

Serving Pets In Poverty: A New Frontier For The Animal Welfare Movement, Amanda Arrington, Michael Markarian

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


How Fast Is Too Fast? Osha’S Regulation Of The Meat Industry’S Line Speed And The Price Paid By Humans And Animals, Israel Cook 2018 American University, Washington College of Law

How Fast Is Too Fast? Osha’S Regulation Of The Meat Industry’S Line Speed And The Price Paid By Humans And Animals, Israel Cook

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


The Farts Heard ‘Round The World: Where Cow-Tapping Falls On The International Agenda Of Sustainable Development, Alexandra C. Nolan 2018 American University, Washington College of Law

The Farts Heard ‘Round The World: Where Cow-Tapping Falls On The International Agenda Of Sustainable Development, Alexandra C. Nolan

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


This Is Not The Bee’S Knees: A Critical View Of The Government’S Lack Of Policy To Conserve The Pollinators, Savannah Pugh 2018 American University, Washington College of Law

This Is Not The Bee’S Knees: A Critical View Of The Government’S Lack Of Policy To Conserve The Pollinators, Savannah Pugh

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Legislative Efforts To Increase State Management For Imperiled Species Should Be Rejected, Stephanie Kurose 2018 American University Washington College of Law

Legislative Efforts To Increase State Management For Imperiled Species Should Be Rejected, Stephanie Kurose

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Anthropogenic Noise And The Endangered Species Act, Carolyn Larcom 2018 American University, Washington College of Law

Anthropogenic Noise And The Endangered Species Act, Carolyn Larcom

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Cruelty To Human And Nonhuman Animals In The Wild-Caught Fishing Industry, Kathy Hessler, Rebecca Jenkins, Kelly Levenda 2018 Lewis & Clark Law School

Cruelty To Human And Nonhuman Animals In The Wild-Caught Fishing Industry, Kathy Hessler, Rebecca Jenkins, Kelly Levenda

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


The “Fowl” Practice Of Humane Labeling: Proposed Amendments To Federal Standards Governing Chicken Welfare And Poultry Labeling Practices, LaTravia Smith 2018 American University Washington College of Law

The “Fowl” Practice Of Humane Labeling: Proposed Amendments To Federal Standards Governing Chicken Welfare And Poultry Labeling Practices, Latravia Smith

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

Chickens raised specifically for meat production are the world’s most intensively farmed land animals. Yet, the existing legal frameworks that regulate the production and labeling of poultry products in the United States allow poultry producers to mistreat chickens, falsely distinguish poultry products, and defraud conscious consumers. This article proposes unique opportunities to improve poultry welfare in the United States’ agricultural industry and offers methods to ensure the accurate labeling of poultry products.


Cafos: Plaguing North Carolina Communities Of Color, Christine Ball-Blakely 2018 American University Washington College of Law

Cafos: Plaguing North Carolina Communities Of Color, Christine Ball-Blakely

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


About Sdlp, 2018 American University Washington College of Law

About Sdlp

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Editor's Note, Luke Trompeter, Ingrid Lesemann 2018 American University Washington College of Law

Editor's Note, Luke Trompeter, Ingrid Lesemann

Sustainable Development Law & Policy

No abstract provided.


Fairness At A Price: Protecting The Integrity Of Athletic Competitions At The Expense Of Female Athletes, Annie Bach Yen Nguyen 2018 University of Notre Dame

Fairness At A Price: Protecting The Integrity Of Athletic Competitions At The Expense Of Female Athletes, Annie Bach Yen Nguyen

Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law

Ever since women were allowed to compete in the Olympics, they have been subjected to some form of gender verification. Initially, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and International Amateur Athletic Federation (IAAF) required female athletes to present certificates from their doctors confirming that they were in fact women. In 1966, the IOC and the IAAF “decided they couldn’t trust individual nations to certify femininity, and instead implemented a mandatory genital check of every woman competing at international games.” This process was dubbed the “nude parades”. In response to the overwhelming disapproval of such examination, the IOC and IAAF began ...


Forced Evictions, Homelessness, And Destruction: Summer "Games"? Olympic Violations Of The Right To Adequate Housing In Rio De Janeiro, Leigha C. Crout 2018 Cornell University

Forced Evictions, Homelessness, And Destruction: Summer "Games"? Olympic Violations Of The Right To Adequate Housing In Rio De Janeiro, Leigha C. Crout

Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law

This article details the violations of the right to housing that took place in preparation for the 2016 Summer Olympics held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Analyzed under the international, regional, and domestic instruments that enumerate this guarantee, including the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights, the Charter and the Declaration of the Rights and Duties of the Organization of American States, and the Constitution of Brazil, the aim of this work is to draw attention to the systematic deprivation of one of the most central human rights in the name of the Games.


Joint Declaration On Freedom Of Expression And “Fake News,” Disinformation, And Propaganda, Mickey Huff 2018 Diablo Valley College

Joint Declaration On Freedom Of Expression And “Fake News,” Disinformation, And Propaganda, Mickey Huff

Secrecy and Society

No abstract provided.


Litigating Genocide: A Consideration Of The Criminal Court In Light Of The German Jew's Legal Response To Nazi Persecution, 1933-1941, Jody M. Prescott 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Litigating Genocide: A Consideration Of The Criminal Court In Light Of The German Jew's Legal Response To Nazi Persecution, 1933-1941, Jody M. Prescott

Maine Law Review

After years of negotiation, a majority of the nations of the world have agreed to create an International Criminal Court. It will be given jurisdiction over three core types of offenses: genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. With regard to war crimes, however, nations that join the court may take advantage of an “opt-out” procedure, whereby the court's jurisdiction over these offenses may be rejected for seven years after the court comes into existence. For various reasons, a small number of nations, including the United States, have refused to sign the treaty creating the court. While heralded as ...


Protests, Terrorism, And Development: On Ethiopia's Perpetual State Of Emergency, Awol Allo 2018 Lecturer at Keele University School of Law

Protests, Terrorism, And Development: On Ethiopia's Perpetual State Of Emergency, Awol Allo

Yale Human Rights and Development Law Journal

On October 8, 2016, the Ethiopian government officially declared a nationwide state of emergency in response to a year-long protest by members of Ethiopia's two largest ethnic groups, the Oromo and the Amhara. The Directive issued to implement the state of emergency institutes a new normative regime, astonishing in scope and scale, in which the de jure reversal of the relationship between the rule and the exception has culminated in a new legal reality. This Article argues that Ethiopia's de jure emergency is merely the latest manifestation of the de facto state of emergency in operation since the ...


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