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Police Misconduct, Video Recording, And Procedural Barriers To Rights Enforcement, Howard M. Wasserman 2018 Florida International University College of Law

Police Misconduct, Video Recording, And Procedural Barriers To Rights Enforcement, Howard M. Wasserman

Howard M Wasserman

The story of police reform and of "policing the police" has become the story of video and video evidence, and "record everything to know the truth" has become the singular mantra. Video, both police-created and citizen-created, has become the singular tool for ensuring police accountability, reforming law enforcement, and enforcing the rights of victims of police misconduct. This Article explores procedural problems surrounding the use of video recording and video evidence to counter police misconduct, hold individual officers and governments accountable, and reform departmental policies, regulations, and practices. It considers four issues: 1) the mistaken belief that video can "speak ...


Legal Limbo: The Fifth Circuit's Decision In Turner V. Driver Fails To Clarify The Contours Of The Public's First Amendment Right To Record The Police, Stephanie Johnson 2018 Boston College Law School

Legal Limbo: The Fifth Circuit's Decision In Turner V. Driver Fails To Clarify The Contours Of The Public's First Amendment Right To Record The Police, Stephanie Johnson

Boston College Law Review

On February 16, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, in Turner v. Driver, held that the public has a First Amendment right to record the police that is subject only to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions. Although Turner established that the public has a First Amendment right to film the police, the decision skirted the question of whether the particular conduct in Turner—video recording police activity and/or video recording the police station—was an activity protected by the First Amendment. This Comment argues that the Fifth Circuit erred in not clarifying the ...


Rwu First Amendment Blog: David Logan's Blog: Media Centralization Imperils Marketplace Of Ideas 04-05-2018, David A. Logan 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Rwu First Amendment Blog: David Logan's Blog: Media Centralization Imperils Marketplace Of Ideas 04-05-2018, David A. Logan

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


Law School News: 'Marketplace Of Ideas' Imperiled (04-05-2018), David A. Logan 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Law School News: 'Marketplace Of Ideas' Imperiled (04-05-2018), David A. Logan

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


The First Amendment, The University And Conflict: An Introduction To The Symposium, Christina E. Wells 2018 University of Missouri School of Law

The First Amendment, The University And Conflict: An Introduction To The Symposium, Christina E. Wells

Faculty Publications

Universities across the country have experienced a dramatic increase in free speech conflicts - i.e., an experience of discord between individuals or groups of speakers. These conflicts occur in various forms. For example, members of university communities (e.g., students, staff, or faculty) have protested controversial speakers. Some have called for universities to disinvite controversial speakers. Others have heckled or shouted down speakers. Finally, some members of university communities - usually students - have protested university officials' or other students' expression by occupying buildings, camping or interrupting meetings in order to disseminate their message. It is common to view resolution of these ...


Inciting Terrorism On The Internet: The Limits Of Tolerating Intolerance, Amos N. Guiora 2018 S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah

Inciting Terrorism On The Internet: The Limits Of Tolerating Intolerance, Amos N. Guiora

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

The Internet is a limitless platform for information and data sharing. It is, in addition, however, a low-cost, high-speed dissemination mechanism that facilitates the spreading of hate speech, including violent and virtual threats. Indictment and prosecution for social media posts that transgress from opinion to incitable hate speech are appropriate in limited circumstances. Several real-world examples discussed here help to explore when limitations on Internet-based hate speech are appropriate.

In October 2015, twenty thousand Israelis joined a civil lawsuit filed against Facebook in the Supreme Court for the State of New York. Led by the civil rights organization Shurat HaDin ...


Corporate Social Responsibility And Social Media Corporations: Incorporating Human Rights Through Rankings, Self-Regulation And Shareholder Resolutions, Erika George 2018 S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah

Corporate Social Responsibility And Social Media Corporations: Incorporating Human Rights Through Rankings, Self-Regulation And Shareholder Resolutions, Erika George

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

This article examines the emergence and evolution of selected ranking and reporting frameworks in the expanding realm of business and human rights advocacy. It explores how indicators in the form of rankings and reports evaluating the conduct of transnational corporate actors can serve as regulatory tools with potential to bridge a global governance gap that often places human rights at risk. This article examines the relationship of transnational corporations in the Internet communications technology sector (ICT sector) to human rights and the risks presented to the right to freedom of expression and the right to privacy when ICT sector companies ...


The Resilient Foundation Of Democracy: The Legal Deconstruction Of The Washington Posts's Condemnation Of Edward Snowden, Hanna Kim 2018 Indiana University

The Resilient Foundation Of Democracy: The Legal Deconstruction Of The Washington Posts's Condemnation Of Edward Snowden, Hanna Kim

Indiana Law Journal

On September 17, 2016, The Washington Post (“the Post”) made history by being the first paper to ever call for the criminal prosecution of its own source —Edward Snowden. Yet, two years prior to this editorial, the Post accepted the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in Public Service for its “revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency”—an honor which would not have been bestowed had Snowden not leaked the documents through this news outlet. The other three major media outlets that received and published Snowden’s documents and findings—The Guardian, The New York Times, and The Intercept ...


Defending University Speech Codes: An Essay On Why Universities Speech Codes Make Sense, Daniel Alexander Schultz 2018 DePauw University

Defending University Speech Codes: An Essay On Why Universities Speech Codes Make Sense, Daniel Alexander Schultz

Student research

No abstract provided.


The First Amendment And Content Restrictions In State Film Incentive Programs, Dr. Joel Timmer 2018 Loyola Marymount University and Loyola Law School

The First Amendment And Content Restrictions In State Film Incentive Programs, Dr. Joel Timmer

Loyola of Los Angeles Entertainment Law Review

In recent years, many states have offered incentive programs to lure film production and its associated economic benefits—increased jobs, spending, and tourism—to their states. Several of these programs have restrictions that deny incentives based on a film’s content. For example, Texas denies film incentives to projects that have “inappropriate content” or portray “Texas or Texans in a negative way.” This article concludes that these restrictions do not violate the First Amendment. Two key considerations factor into this conclusion: First, in granting subsidies, the government may apply criteria that would be impermissible in a regulatory context. Second, the ...


Whistleblowing Speech And The First Amendment, Ronald J. Krotoszynski Jr. 2018 University of Alabama School of Law

Whistleblowing Speech And The First Amendment, Ronald J. Krotoszynski Jr.

Indiana Law Journal

Alexander Meiklejohn, the iconic First Amendment scholar who expounded the democratic self-government theory of the freedom of speech, posited that for demo-cratic self-government to function, the voters themselves must possess the infor-mation necessary to hold the government accountable. Yet, the information neces-sary for the citizenry to render wise electoral verdicts not uncommonly belongs to the government itself, and government officials often prove highly reluctant to share information that reflects badly on them and their work. The lack of critically im-portant information about the government’s performance makes it difficult, if not impossible, for voters to hold government accountable on Election ...


Rfra As Legislative Entrenchment, Branden Lewiston 2018 Pepperdine University

Rfra As Legislative Entrenchment, Branden Lewiston

Pepperdine Law Review

When there is a conflict between two federal statutes, the more recent statute overrides the past statute. However, courts have used the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) to preempt federal laws passed after it. Normally that is the role of constitutional provisions, not statutes. RFRA has been subject to much constitutional criticism, but its attempt to control subsequent federal law has drawn little attention. Courts use RFRA to trump subsequent federal statutes without second thought. This Essay draws on legislative entrenchment doctrine to argue that this feature of RFRA is unconstitutional. RFRA should be used to strike down prior laws ...


Mayhew V. Town Of Smyrna: The Sixth Circuit Frustrates Public Employees' Right To A Jury Trial, Margaux Joselow 2018 Boston College Law School

Mayhew V. Town Of Smyrna: The Sixth Circuit Frustrates Public Employees' Right To A Jury Trial, Margaux Joselow

Boston College Law Review

On May 11, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, in Mayhew v. Town of Smyrna, held that the protected status of a public employee’s speech in a First Amendment retaliation claim remains one of law, rather than one of mixed law and fact. In so doing, the Sixth Circuit disallowed jury determinations on the fact-intensive inquiry into the protected status of the employee’s speech. This Comment argues that despite having the invaluable opportunity—as a historically conservative court—to defend the voices of public employees, the Sixth Circuit continued its obliteration of public ...


Praying For Clarity: Lund, Bormuth, And The Split Over Legislator-Led Prayer, John Gavin 2018 Boston College Law School

Praying For Clarity: Lund, Bormuth, And The Split Over Legislator-Led Prayer, John Gavin

Boston College Law Review

On September 6, 2017, the en banc U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit released its opinion in Bormuth v. County of Jackson, finding prayers offered by the Jackson County Board of Commissioners constitutional under the Establishment Clause. That decision involved detailed factual analysis, which varied greatly from the analysis used by the en banc U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit to find nearly identical prayers by the Rowan County Board of Commissioners unconstitutional in Lund v. Rowan County on July 14, 2017. This Comment argues that the method of analysis conducted by the en ...


Rwu First Amendment Blog: David Logan's Blog: Weather Forecast For March 25: Stormy On 60 Minutes? 03-18-2018, David A. Logan 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Rwu First Amendment Blog: David Logan's Blog: Weather Forecast For March 25: Stormy On 60 Minutes? 03-18-2018, David A. Logan

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


The Bergdahl Block: How The Military Limits Public Access To Preliminary Hearings And What We Can Do About It, Eric R. Carpenter 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

The Bergdahl Block: How The Military Limits Public Access To Preliminary Hearings And What We Can Do About It, Eric R. Carpenter

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl and Private First Class Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning have something in common. Military officials unlawfully closed all or portions of their preliminary hearings to the public. When doing so, military officials exploited two unusual features of the military justice system, thereby denying the accused and the media of their respective Sixth Amendment and First Amendment rights to a public hearing.

The first feature is that the military justice system does not include a standing trial-level court. If there is a problem at the preliminary hearing, the accused and media have nowhere to go for help. The accused ...


National Security Letters And Intelligence Oversight, Michael J. Greenlee 2018 Concordia University School of Law

National Security Letters And Intelligence Oversight, Michael J. Greenlee

Michael Greenlee

The history of NSL [national security letter] powers can serve as an illuminating example of the post­-Church Committee development of intelligence investigations. Many of the Church Committee findings and recommendations concerning the need for expanded oversight to prevent the executive branch from violating or ignoring the law, excessively using intrusive investigation techniques, and conducting overbroad investigations with inadequate controls on the retention and dissemi­nation of the information gathered are all reflected in the development of NSL powers and authorities from their creation in 1978 through passage of the PlRA [USA PATRIOT Improvement and Reauthorization Act] in 2006. At ...


Maine's "Act To Protect Traditional Marriage And Prohibit Same-Sex Marriages": Questions Of Constitutionality Under State And Federal Law, Jennifer B. Wriggins 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Maine's "Act To Protect Traditional Marriage And Prohibit Same-Sex Marriages": Questions Of Constitutionality Under State And Federal Law, Jennifer B. Wriggins

Maine Law Review

In 1997, Maine's Legislature passed “An Act to Protect Traditional Marriage and Prohibit Same-Sex Marriages” (Act). The summary attached to the bill states that the bill “prohibits persons of the same sex from contracting marriage.” The bill was the verbatim text of an initiative petition. Civil marriage in Maine and other states is regulated by state statute, and marriage regulation is generally considered to be within the state's police power. However, the state's power to regulate marriage is subject to constitutional limitations. I maintain that “heightened scrutiny” should be applied to the Act because the Act creates ...


Zombie Religious Institutions, Elizabeth Sepper 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Zombie Religious Institutions, Elizabeth Sepper

Northwestern University Law Review

This Article uncovers and names a phenomenon of pressing importance for healthcare policy and religious liberty law: the rise of zombie religious institutions—organizations that have contractual commitments to religious identity but lack actual attachments to churches or associations of religious people. Contracts create religion—sometimes in perpetuity—for institutions that are not, or never have been, religious and for providers who do not share the institution’s religious precepts. This Article details religion’s spread across healthcare through affiliations, mergers, and—most surprisingly—sales of hospitals that continue religious practice after their connection to a church ends. These contracts ...


The Public Defender's Pin: Untangling Free Speech Regulation In The Courtroom, Michael Kagan 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

The Public Defender's Pin: Untangling Free Speech Regulation In The Courtroom, Michael Kagan

Northwestern University Law Review

Recent disputes in Ohio and Nevada about whether lawyers should be allowed to wear “Black Lives Matter” pins in open court expose a fault line in First Amendment law. Lower courts have generally been unsympathetic to lawyers who display political symbols in court. But it would go too far suggest that free speech has no relevance in courtrooms. This Essay argues for a way to strike a balance.


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