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Animals In Irish Literature And Culture Edited By Kathryn Kirkpatrick And Borbála Faragó, Geneviève Pigeon 2016 Université du Québec à Montréal

Animals In Irish Literature And Culture Edited By Kathryn Kirkpatrick And Borbála Faragó, Geneviève Pigeon

The Goose

Review of Kathryn Kirkpatrick and Borbála Faragó's Animals in Irish Literature and Culture.


"Historia Brittonum" And Britain’S Twenty-Eight Cities, Andrew Breeze 2016 Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona

"Historia Brittonum" And Britain’S Twenty-Eight Cities, Andrew Breeze

Journal of Literary Onomastics

Certain versions of the ninth-century _Historia Brittonum_ have an additional chapter (66a), nominally containing a list of "all the cities in the whole of Britain, twenty-eight in number". It has intrigued medieval and modern scholars alike. They have struggled to identify the names as those of Roman Britain's cities, for the most part without success. In the present paper a new approach is tried. While some of the places listed are genuine Roman cities (but also medieval ones), such as Winchester, Carlisle, York, London, Canterbury, or Chester, others are no such thing. They can be shown on the basis ...


Norse "Loki" As Praxonym, William Sayers 2016 Cornell University

Norse "Loki" As Praxonym, William Sayers

Journal of Literary Onomastics

The still debated Old Norse theonym Loki is projected against the wide semantic field of the ON verb lúka "to close", not, as current scholarship would have it, as relevant to Ragnarǫk and the closing down of the divine world but in its judicial applications to successfull negotiated outcomes. The ingenious Loki, the bearer of a praxonym, would then be the inventive Fixer. While this aspect is well illustrated in tales of Loki's ruses and expedients, a more archaic figure emerges when Loki is associated with the reconstructed Indo-European verbal root *lok- "to accuse, blame, prohibit" (cf. Old Frisian ...


Models Of Reconciliation: From Conflict Towards Peace In Northern Ireland And South Africa During The 1990s, Alec Timberlake Bishop 2016 Seattle Pacific University

Models Of Reconciliation: From Conflict Towards Peace In Northern Ireland And South Africa During The 1990s, Alec Timberlake Bishop

Honors Projects

This paper is a critical analysis of two case studies that serve several purposes. One, it familiarizes the reader who may have a cursory understanding of the historical events involving the peace processes in Northern Ireland and South Africa during the 1990s with the narratives of conflict and peace that occurred in these countries during this time. It also analyzes the distinction between a peaceful resolution of conflict and reconciliation, making the claim that within instances of conflict, positive and sustained contact is essential to moving beyond a peaceful resolution of conflict towards reconciliation. In this way, this work adds ...


The Power Of A Secret: Ireland’S Secret Societies Involvement In Irish Nationalism, Sierra M. Harlan 2016 Dominican University of California

The Power Of A Secret: Ireland’S Secret Societies Involvement In Irish Nationalism, Sierra M. Harlan

Scholarly and Creative Works Conference

The Irish Republican Brotherhood (I.R.B.) and the Irish Volunteer Force (I.V.F.) altered Irish Nationalist tactics from Parliamentary supported Home Rule to a republican movement for Irish Independence. The actions of these secret societies between the years of 1900 through 1917, before the Irish Revolutionary period,[1] are the reason that Ireland gained independence from United Kingdom in 1921. The change from political negotiations by the ineffective Irish Parliamentary Party to the republican movement would never have happened without the Easter Rising of 1916. The centennial anniversary of this Easter Rising makes The Power of a Secret ...


"Democratic Packing Horses No More: The Fenian Brotherhood And The Radical Republican Agenda In 1867", Matt Knight 2016 University of South Florida, Tampa

"Democratic Packing Horses No More: The Fenian Brotherhood And The Radical Republican Agenda In 1867", Matt Knight

Matt Knight

Let us hear no more of Ireland and the South. The South drew the sword for the maintenance of the vilest form of slavery; Ireland draws the sword for liberty.


Psalms On The Shannon: A Collection Of Choral Pieces In The Irish Celtic Style, Greta E. Hanks 2016 Liberty University

Psalms On The Shannon: A Collection Of Choral Pieces In The Irish Celtic Style, Greta E. Hanks

Senior Honors Theses

The Irish music tradition has a rich heritage ranging from ancient ballads to nineteenth-century dances. One area of Irish music, a subset of Celtic music in general, that has been somewhat underrepresented in modern times is Irish choral music. Scripturally-based choral singing has been part of the Irish tradition ever since medieval monks began Christianizing the Celts. Today, several choral groups in Ireland are working to revive the art of Celtic choral singing. This collection, presenting psalms set to choral music in the Irish style, is one modern composer’s endeavor to join the Irish choral genre, incorporating traditional harmonic ...


The Circumference Of Community, Patricia A. F. O'Luanaigh MA 2016 California Institute of Integral Studies

The Circumference Of Community, Patricia A. F. O'Luanaigh Ma

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Souvenir Program Booklet For The Women And Spirituality Symposium, Regennia N. Williams PhD, Patricia A. F. O'Luanaigh MA 2016 Initiative for the Study of Religion and Spirituality in the History of Africa and the Diaspora

Souvenir Program Booklet For The Women And Spirituality Symposium, Regennia N. Williams Phd, Patricia A. F. O'Luanaigh Ma

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Revised Emblems Of Erin In Novels By John Mcgahern And Colum Mccann (2015), Shaun O’Connell 2015 University of Massachusetts Boston

Revised Emblems Of Erin In Novels By John Mcgahern And Colum Mccann (2015), Shaun O’Connell

New England Journal of Public Policy

In “Cathal’s Lake,” a 1996 story by Colum McCann, “a big [Irish] farmer with a thick chest” lives by a lake, “which in itself is a miniature countryside—ringed with chestnut trees and brambles, banked ten feet high on the northern side, with another mound of dirt on the eastern side, where frogsong can often be heard.” In By the Lake, a 2002 novel by John McGahern, an aging Irishman also lives by a lake, another enclosed space of tranquility, as is suggested in the opening lines: “The morning was clear. There was no wind on the lake. There ...


Lexical Semantics And Patterns Of Causation, Brian Nolan 2015 Dublin Institute of Technology

Lexical Semantics And Patterns Of Causation, Brian Nolan

The ITB Journal

In this paper we provide a brief account of patterns of causation in modern Irish that occur with lexically causative verbs. Three types of causation are found in modern Irish: lexical, periphrastic and morphological. In terms of the relative weightings of each type, the morphological causative is the least productive. Its use appears to be highly constrained to two very specific domains and it is signalled by particular morphological affixes. Lexical causatives are more productive than the morphological causative. By contrast, periphrastic or analytical causatives are highly productive and wide-ranging in their deployment. A claim of this paper is that ...


A Brief Characterisation Of Morphological Causation In Irish, Brian Nolan 2015 Dublin Institute of Technology

A Brief Characterisation Of Morphological Causation In Irish, Brian Nolan

The ITB Journal

In this paper we attempt to characterise some elements of morphological causation as expressed in modern Irish. Three types of causation may be identified: lexical, periphrastic and morphological. In terms of the relative weightings of each type, the morphological causative is the least productive. Its use appears to be highly constrained to two very specific domains and it is signalled by particular morphological affixes. Lexical causatives are more productive than the morphological causative. By contrast, periphrastic or analytical causatives are highly productive and wide-ranging in their deployment. We concentrate in this analysis on some data on morphological causation.


How The West Was Wonderful; Some Historical Perspectives On Representations Of The West Of Ireland In Popular Culture, Kevin Martin 2015 Dublin Institute of Technology

How The West Was Wonderful; Some Historical Perspectives On Representations Of The West Of Ireland In Popular Culture, Kevin Martin

The ITB Journal

The idealisation of life in the west of Ireland was central to the mission of the Irish Literary revival. The images of life in the west served as an idealised counterpoint to the grubby, urban, materialistic and valueless society that could be viewed a short distance across the Irish Sea. The romantic mythologising of the west of Ireland peasant was a key tenet of the ‘Celtic Twilight’.


Towards A Study Of Situation Types Of Irish, Brian Nolan 2015 Dublin Institute of Technology

Towards A Study Of Situation Types Of Irish, Brian Nolan

The ITB Journal

In this paper we analyse the structure of situation types as found in Irish. We translate these situation types into a logical metalanguage, giving the logical structure of each type. We do this to differentiate, for Irish, the aktionsarten distinctions of state, activity, achievement and accomplishment as they are found within the language. The motivation of this paper is therefore to describe the aktionsart of modern Irish and to determine the logical structure that underpins these situation types.


From Honor To Ridicule To Shame To Fame: The Naming And Re-Naming Of Túrin Son Of Húrin, Marie Nelson 2015 University of Florida

From Honor To Ridicule To Shame To Fame: The Naming And Re-Naming Of Túrin Son Of Húrin, Marie Nelson

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


The Xxuiii Ciuitates Brittannię Of The Historia Brittonum: Antiquarian Speculation In Early Medieval Wales, Keith J. Fitzpatrick-Matthews 2015 North Hertfordshire Museum

The Xxuiii Ciuitates Brittannię Of The Historia Brittonum: Antiquarian Speculation In Early Medieval Wales, Keith J. Fitzpatrick-Matthews

Journal of Literary Onomastics

A reassessment of the list of civitates in Chapter 66a of the Historia Brittonum is attempted through the establishment of a reliable text as it is preserved in a number of versions. Analysis of each name is attempted by working back to its hypothetical Brittonic original. Some names attested in Classical and early medieval sources are readily identifiable and can be identified with Roman or Romano-British sites; some names have survived into more recent times and can also be identified with known sites, although some remain difficult. Of particular interest is a group named after real or legendary characters known ...


The Arthurian Battle Of Badon And Braydon Forest, Wiltshire, Andrew Breeze 2015 Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona

The Arthurian Battle Of Badon And Braydon Forest, Wiltshire, Andrew Breeze

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Revised Emblems Of Erin In Novels By John Mcgahern And Colum Mccann, Shaun O’Connell 2015 University of Massachusetts Boston

Revised Emblems Of Erin In Novels By John Mcgahern And Colum Mccann, Shaun O’Connell

New England Journal of Public Policy

In “Cathal’s Lake,” a 1996 story by Colum McCann, “a big [Irish] farmer with a thick chest” lives by a lake, “which in itself is a miniature countryside—ringed with chestnut trees and brambles, banked ten feet high on the northern side, with another mound of dirt on the eastern side, where frogsong can often be heard.” In By the Lake, a 2002 novel by John McGahern, an aging Irishman also lives by a lake, another enclosed space of tranquility, as is suggested in the opening lines: “The morning was clear. There was no wind on the lake. There ...


Pollataggle: An Exhibition And Photo Book, Kaitrin R. Acuna 2015 University of Connecticut - Storrs

Pollataggle: An Exhibition And Photo Book, Kaitrin R. Acuna

University Scholar Projects

Pollataggle is a series of photographs by Kaitrin Acuna that explores childlike imagination and the unreal. The imagery may be viewed at KaitrinAcuna.com and the following is a reflection on the process and outcome of creating the series. This paper reflects on the process of photographing each component of the final images, the inspiration, the process in Photoshop, and the exhibition of the work.


The Pendragon Cycle: Celtic Christianity In The Arthurian Legend Through Bards, Prophets, And Historians, Rebecca L. Heine 2015 Student

The Pendragon Cycle: Celtic Christianity In The Arthurian Legend Through Bards, Prophets, And Historians, Rebecca L. Heine

College of William & Mary Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis centers on The Pendragon Cycle as a late-twentieth century retelling of the Arthurian legend by the American author Stephen Lawhead. Through The Pendragon Cycle, Lawhead emphasizes the historical foundation of Arthuriana in the setting of fifth-century Britain while simultaneously incorporating mythology from the Atlanteans, to the Celtic Otherworld, to the Holy Grail. Lawhead draws inspiration from medieval Welsh and Christian characterizations of the legend such as medieval historical chronicles like The History of the Kings of Britain by Geoffrey of Monmouth; following in the footsteps of medieval historians, Lawhead uses the medium of the Arthurian legend to present ...


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