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Tyndarus’ Bilingual Pun And The Ambiguities Of Plautus’ Captivi. (Accepted; Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

Tyndarus’ Bilingual Pun And The Ambiguities Of Plautus’ Captivi. (Accepted; Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

The article argues for a bilingual (Greek/Latin) pun at Plautus' Captivi 229-230, spoken by the principal character, Tyndarus, and places it within the context of his depiction and the generic ambiguity of the play itself.


The First Person Hortatory Subjunctive In New Comedy (Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

The First Person Hortatory Subjunctive In New Comedy (Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

ABSTRACT: Article considers patterns of usage in the type ποιῶμεν  in Menander.


Insight Into The Community: Bee Similes In The Iliad And The Aeneid, Sara Heist 2016 Liberty University

Insight Into The Community: Bee Similes In The Iliad And The Aeneid, Sara Heist

Montview Liberty University Journal of Undergraduate Research

This paper offers a comparative analysis of the bee similes in Homer’s Iliad and Virgil’s Aeneid to demonstrate that there are significant thematic connections between the similes in the two epics. In both works, bee similes illustrate the structure of the ideal society, as a close reading of each simile reveals. This paper demonstrates that both Homeric and Virgilian bee similes focus on the concept of community. In the Iliad, Homer’s first extended simile compares the Greek forces to a colony of bees. This prominent placement foreshadows the significance of bee similes in the Homeric epic. As ...


Catullan Obscenity And Modern English Translation, Tori Frances Lee 2016 Washington University in St. Louis

Catullan Obscenity And Modern English Translation, Tori Frances Lee

Arts & Sciences Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This thesis explores the ways Catullus uses obscenity in his poetry, and how modern translators captures those effects when translating obscenity into English. I first define obscenity by creating four categories of words that all have to do with taboo topics and exist only in certain contexts, outside of polite company: obscenities, technical terms, circumlocutions, and euphemisms. The first chapter analyzes Poems 16, 37, and 97, Catullus's most obscene, to show that the poet uses profanity as a literary device that gains its strength from its juxtaposition with non-obscene words. The second chapter looks at seven English translations written ...


Political Polupragmones: Busybody Athenians, Meddlesome Citizenship, And Epistemic Democracy In Classical Athens, Harry D. Rube 2016 Bowdoin College

Political Polupragmones: Busybody Athenians, Meddlesome Citizenship, And Epistemic Democracy In Classical Athens, Harry D. Rube

Honors Projects

The figure of the πολυπράγμων, the overactive, over-engaged, or meddlesome democratic citizen, is a literary trope that emerges in Classical Athenian literature in the 5th and 4th centuries B.C. This project seeks to use the πολυπράγμων as an entry point into understanding Athenian attitudes toward citizenship and socially acceptable political behaviors in Athens’ democratic era.

I explore the history and usage of the term πολυπράγμων, and the associated characteristic of πολυπραγμοσύνη (meddlesomeness), and its synonyms and antecedents. I demonstrate that to be labeled πολυπράγμων is a term of social restraint—one is named a πολυπράγμων if they ...


Dante’S Hidden Sin - Wrath: How Dante Vindictively Used The Inferno Against Contemporaries, Michael J. Rupers 2016 Dominican University of California

Dante’S Hidden Sin - Wrath: How Dante Vindictively Used The Inferno Against Contemporaries, Michael J. Rupers

Master's Theses and Capstone Projects

Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) takes his readers on a pilgrimage through what he calls the Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (ostensibly Hell, Purgatory and Heaven) in his epic poem The Divine Comedy, originally titled Commedia. This paper concentrates exclusively on Dante’s contemporaries, those people who lived during his lifetime, and examines his possible motivation for targeting enemy Ghibellines, Black Guelphs, treacherous White Guelphs, corrupt popes, and others who either crossed him or caused him trouble. He vindictively used his masterpiece to lash out at his contemporary enemies, exacting retribution against many who angered him in his lifetime or otherwise offended his ...


Slavery: The Main Ingredient To An Ancient Greek Polis' Military Dominance, Steven T. Tran 2016 Clackamas High School

Slavery: The Main Ingredient To An Ancient Greek Polis' Military Dominance, Steven T. Tran

Young Historians Conference

Spartan and Athens' victories against the Persians and their eventual military dominance cannot be attributed to military strategy or government alone. The social acceptance of slavery provided the foundation for Greek poleis' social and economic spheres, leading to the development of slave deployment during the Persian Wars and Peloponnesian War. An in-depth analysis of Classical Greece slavery shows that its prevalence is much greater than what previous historians have thought, and more notably, that it was one of the most massive slave usage in history, allowing for the development of a dominating western world.


Skyscrapers Of Rome, Elizabeth B. Condie 2016 Clackamas HIgh School

Skyscrapers Of Rome, Elizabeth B. Condie

Young Historians Conference

After the death of his mentor, Julius Caesar, in 27 B.C.E., Caesar Augustus scrambled to establish his power over the people. One of the tactics he used to exert his power was architecture. Throughout the years, succeeding emperors followed his example to use architecture as a means to control public image, maintain military and political authority, and display their divine power. The Roman forum, the Coliseum, and the Arch of Titus give insight into the control of the Roman Emperors. From these buildings sprang many different types of architecture, that are still used to display the power of ...


Women In Power: The Unique Position Of Vestal Virgins In Ancient Rome, Elizabeth D. Walker 2016 Clackamas High School

Women In Power: The Unique Position Of Vestal Virgins In Ancient Rome, Elizabeth D. Walker

Young Historians Conference

The Vestal Virgins, priestesses in Ancient Rome, were placed in an atypical position of power. They were given many religious responsibilities that replaced the traditional expectations for women of Antiquity. This cult of the goddess Vesta lasted for the majority of Roman civilization, seemingly serving as an argument for an advancement in the rights of ancient women. Though the Vestal Virgins seem to be an outstanding exception to the rule of female oppression throughout history, further examination suggests that the role of Vestal priestess was simply another mode through which Roman men could control their female counterparts.


What’S Your Temperament: The Humoral Theory’S Influence On Medicine In Ancient Greece, Riley Sebers 2016 Clackamas High School

What’S Your Temperament: The Humoral Theory’S Influence On Medicine In Ancient Greece, Riley Sebers

Young Historians Conference

Prior to the birth of Hippocrates of Cos in 460 BCE, medicine in ancient Greece revolved around the gods and magic. During Hippocrates lifetime, he remastered an old practice called the humoral theory: an idea stating that every individual person has a unique balance of substances called humors in their body. The balance of these humors is what keeps a man healthy, and if a specific amount is disturbed, sickness sets in. This theory allowed physicians in ancient Greece to move away from dominantly using magic to treat illness and start using the humoral theory instead.


The Rise And Fall Of Human Dissection In Hellenistic Alexandria, Ellie H. Barany 2016 Riverdale High School

The Rise And Fall Of Human Dissection In Hellenistic Alexandria, Ellie H. Barany

Young Historians Conference

Classical and Hellenistic Greece were known to be a hub of scientific research. However, the potential for scientific discovery was limited by dominating religious beliefs. Advancements in the study of human anatomy were inhibited by religious taboos that prevented the practice of human dissection. These taboos took hold of Greek society, with a consequence of exile to anyone who violated them. The exception however, is in Hellenistic Alexandria under the rule of the Ptolemaic Kings, Soter and Philadelphus. This paper examines the factors under which the Greek scientist Herophilus was allowed to practice systematic human dissection, as well as the ...


Plato's Ethics: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Emmanuelle M. McKinney 2016 Clackamas High School

Plato's Ethics: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Emmanuelle M. Mckinney

Young Historians Conference

Plato is undeniably one of the most influential men in the history of Western philosophy, and he deeply examined a remarkable number of diverse fields. However, in the attempt to understand his various writings, scholars too often over-categorize Plato’s work without recognizing that there are no partitioning lines between subjects: they are all blended together to form a complex body of thought. This paper summarizes Plato’s philosophy of ethics, with a focus on its inclusion of many contrasting disciplines.


Sophocles' Electra As Agent Of Metatheatricality, 2016 University of Pennsylvania

Sophocles' Electra As Agent Of Metatheatricality

Discentes

No abstract provided.


An Alliterative Translation Of The Odyssey Book A: Lines 1-10, 2016 University of Pennsylvania

An Alliterative Translation Of The Odyssey Book A: Lines 1-10

Discentes

No abstract provided.


Animus After Actium? Antony, Augustus, And Damnatio Memoriae, 2016 University of Pennsylvania

Animus After Actium? Antony, Augustus, And Damnatio Memoriae

Discentes

No abstract provided.


Delphi And Discord, 2016 University of Pennsylvania

Delphi And Discord

Discentes

No abstract provided.


A Rhetorical Redemption: Dido In The Classroom From Late Antiquity To The Fifteenth Century, 2016 University of Pennsylvania

A Rhetorical Redemption: Dido In The Classroom From Late Antiquity To The Fifteenth Century

Discentes

No abstract provided.


Poetry Praising Poetry: An Examination Of Alcuin's Better-Known Poems, 2016 University of Pennsylvania

Poetry Praising Poetry: An Examination Of Alcuin's Better-Known Poems

Discentes

No abstract provided.


Faculty Interview With Rita Copeland, 2016 University of Pennsylvania

Faculty Interview With Rita Copeland

Discentes

No abstract provided.


From The Editors, 2016 University of Pennsylvania

From The Editors

Discentes

No abstract provided.


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