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Mysteries Of Paradise Revealed & Concealed, Brittany Bryant 2018 Pepperdine University

Mysteries Of Paradise Revealed & Concealed, Brittany Bryant

Seaver College Research And Scholarly Achievement Symposium

No abstract provided.


Philosophy And Politics Perfected: Aristotle’S Greatness Of Soul Embodied In Plutarch’S Alexander The Great, Raquel Grove 2018 Pepperdine University

Philosophy And Politics Perfected: Aristotle’S Greatness Of Soul Embodied In Plutarch’S Alexander The Great, Raquel Grove

Seaver College Research And Scholarly Achievement Symposium

In this paper, I examine the value of Aristotle’s “great-souled man” and the narrative structure of Plutarch’s Life of Alexander as political and philosophical exempla designed to lead men to virtue on a large scale. The confusing, apparently contradictory nature of Aristotle’s virtue “greatness of soul” must be read in the context of the Ethics as a deeply political work. Likewise, Plutarch’s description of Alexander the Great demands examination from a narrative, as well as historical, perspective. Despite their differences in emphasis and method, Aristotle and Plutarch produce writings characterized the same end––each work unites ...


Reading Homer's Iliad, Feb., 2018, Edward H. Campbell 2018 Independent Scholar

Reading Homer's Iliad, Feb., 2018, Edward H. Campbell

E. H. Campbell

No abstract provided.


Homer's Iliad Book Ii, 2.289-568 (Manuscript), Edward H. Campbell 2018 Independent Scholar

Homer's Iliad Book Ii, 2.289-568 (Manuscript), Edward H. Campbell

E. H. Campbell

This is a hand written document corresponding to Homer's Iliad book II, lines 2.289-568.


Magic Use In Roman Sexuality, Anne Margaret Chenchar 2018 University of Wyoming

Magic Use In Roman Sexuality, Anne Margaret Chenchar

Undergraduate Research Day

2017 Undergraduate Research Day Award Winner
Category: Award for Excellence in the Liberal Arts

The Roman civilization was incredibly dynamic as it grew and accepted new citizens over the years of its rule. Through the diversity of the culture Romans integrated superstition, and magic use into their society. Roman society put value on the ability to produce viable offspring, and be a competent sexual partner in marriage. Through the stress of this value, Romans who fell short sexually turned to magical practices to help heal them. This idea was so prominent in the society that Gaius Petronius wrote Satyricon a ...


The Marriage Of Cicero: Matrimonial Metaphor In The Second Philippic, Elijah J. Mears 2018 University of North Carolina at Greensboro

The Marriage Of Cicero: Matrimonial Metaphor In The Second Philippic, Elijah J. Mears

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

This paper examines Cicero’s self-presentation in the second Philippic oration and his casting of himself in opposition to Marc Antony, particular in regard to themes of conjugal and marital virtue. I argue that Cicero attempts to augment his own claim to be helmsman of the Roman state by portraying himself as metaphorically married to the Republic: Cicero, throughout the Philippics, bolsters his own virtues by portraying himself in opposition to Antony’s vices, particularly Antony’s many sexual and romantic misdeeds, including his “marriage” to the younger Curio. This comparison points not only to Cicero’s own sexual virtue ...


Footnotes To Footnotes: Whitehead's Plato, Nathan Oglesby 2018 The Graduate Center, CUNY

Footnotes To Footnotes: Whitehead's Plato, Nathan Oglesby

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This dissertation examines the presence of Plato in the philosophical expressions of Alfred North Whitehead (1861-1947). It was Whitehead who issued the well-known remark that “the safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists in a series of footnotes to Plato" -- the purpose of this project is to examine the manner in which Whitehead positioned himself as one such footnote, with respect to his thought itself, and its origins, presentation and reception.

This examination involves: first, an explication of Whitehead’s cosmology and metaphysics and their ostensibly Platonic elements (consisting chiefly in the Timaeus); second, investigation ...


Cynic And Epicurean Parrhesia In Horace's Epodes 5 & 6: Appropriating A Parallel Philosophical Debate For Poetic Purposes, Kent Klymenko 2018 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Cynic And Epicurean Parrhesia In Horace's Epodes 5 & 6: Appropriating A Parallel Philosophical Debate For Poetic Purposes, Kent Klymenko

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Within Horace's fifth and sixth Epodes there is a juxtaposition of canine imagery. This imagery parallels two different interpretations of the philosophical concept of parrhesia or frank speech. Horace examines the parrhesia of Cynicism and contrasts it with the parrhesia of Epicureanism. After establishing Horace's philosophical influences, I engage in a close reading of the two poems through the lens of these competing philosophical interpretations of the same concept. I make the argument that Horace is using his knowledge of philosophy to make a larger poetic point. Although Horace's own stance on parrhesia favors Epicureanism, to the ...


Tragedy And Theodicy: The Role Of The Sufferer From Job To Ahab, Nora Carroll 2018 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Tragedy And Theodicy: The Role Of The Sufferer From Job To Ahab, Nora Carroll

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

The character of Job starts in literature, a trope and archetype of the suffering man who potentially gains wisdom through suffering. Job’s characterization informs a comparison to Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare’s King Lear, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and finally Melville’s Moby-Dick. These versions of Job rally, fight, and rebel against a universe that was once loving and fair towards a more chaotic and nihilistic one. Job’s suffering is on the mark of all tragedy because he not only experiences a downfall, he gains wisdom through universalizing his torment. The Job trope not only stresses the role ...


Homer's Iliad Book Ii, 2.1-288 (Manuscript), Edward H. Campbell 2018 Independent Scholar

Homer's Iliad Book Ii, 2.1-288 (Manuscript), Edward H. Campbell

E. H. Campbell

Handwritten manuscript for my translation of Homer's Iliad book II, lines 1-288.


The Amazons Of Exekias And Eupolis: Demystifying Changes In Gender Roles, Marisa Anne Infante 2018 Southern Methodist University

The Amazons Of Exekias And Eupolis: Demystifying Changes In Gender Roles, Marisa Anne Infante

SMU Journal of Undergraduate Research

n this paper, I will examine the changing gender roles of women as the Athenian government changes from a tyranny in the Archaic period to a democracy in the Classical period by comparing a Black-Figure Amphora, which depicts an image of Achilles Killing Penthesilea, by Exekias and a Red-Figure Column Krater, which depicts an image of an Amazon on Side A and an unidentified figure on Side B, by Eupolis. The creation of democracy was not the universal celebration that it is often praised to be in modern times. I will demonstrate this through a visual analysis of how the ...


Homer's Iliad Book I, 1.342-611 (Manuscript), Edward H. Campbell 2018 Independent Scholar

Homer's Iliad Book I, 1.342-611 (Manuscript), Edward H. Campbell

E. H. Campbell

This is the handwritten manuscript for Homer's Iliad 1.342-611.


Homer's Iliad Book I, 1.92-341 (Manuscript), 2018 Selected Works

Homer's Iliad Book I, 1.92-341 (Manuscript)

E. H. Campbell

This is the handwritten manuscript for Homer's Iliad 1.92-341.


Homer's Iliad Book I, The Rage Of Achilles: A New Translation With Text And Commentary, Edward H. Campbell 2018 Independent Scholar

Homer's Iliad Book I, The Rage Of Achilles: A New Translation With Text And Commentary, Edward H. Campbell

E. H. Campbell

Homeri Opera in five volumes, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1920. The text here is the same as the Oxford version though I have radically altered the capitalization and punctuation of that document to suit my purposes, neither of which are sacred. 157 pages.


The Architecture Of Law: Building Law In The Classical Tradition, Brian M. McCall 2017 University of Oklahoma

The Architecture Of Law: Building Law In The Classical Tradition, Brian M. Mccall

Brian M McCall

The Architecture of Law explores the metaphor of law as an architectural building project, with eternal law as the foundation, natural law as the frame, divine law as the guidance provided by the architect, and human law as the provider of the defining details and ornamentation. Classical jurisprudence is presented as a synthesis of the work of the greatest minds of antiquity and the medieval period, including Cicero, Artistotle, Gratian, Augustine, and Aquinas; the significant texts of each receive detailed exposition in these pages.
Along with McCall’s development of the architectural image, he raises a question that becomes a ...


Vesuvius At Home, Christin Elizabeth Turner 2017 University of Colorado, Boulder

Vesuvius At Home, Christin Elizabeth Turner

Art Practices MFA Theses

Vesuvius At Home is a 14-minute experimental essay film that de-contextualizes Pompeii as a site of personal mythology and memory; beginning with a VHS tape of third-graders re-enacting The Fall of Pompeii in 1993.


Gavin Douglas's Aeneados: Caxton's English And 'Our Scottis Langage', Jacquelyn Hendricks 2017 Santa Clara University

Gavin Douglas's Aeneados: Caxton's English And 'Our Scottis Langage', Jacquelyn Hendricks

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the Scots poet Gavin Douglas's translation of Virgil's Aeneid into Scots, and Douglas's treatment of his predecessor William Caxton's translation of Virgil into English, arguing that Douglas associates Caxton's English with a barbaric world of monsters and beasts, in contrast to Scots which is seen as expressing civilized classical values, and that Douglas's translation, by enhancing and showcasing the literary power of Scots for a wider audience, successfully resisted for at least forty years the linguistic standardization initiated by the burgeoning print industry.


Digital Resources For Scottish Neo-Latin Literature, Ralph McLean 2017 National Library of Scotland

Digital Resources For Scottish Neo-Latin Literature, Ralph Mclean

Studies in Scottish Literature

Provides an annotated guide to the Scottish neo-Latin texts and translations now available in two major digital projects, the Philological Museum (University of Birmingham) and Bridging the Continental Divide (University of Glasgow), with briefer notes on other related print and digital resources, commenting on the importance of fully-annotated editorial and translation projects now fewer students and researchers can tackle such texts in the original Latin.


Notes On Contributors, 2017 Western Michigan University

Notes On Contributors

Transference

No abstract provided.


To Fabullus (Invitation) By Catullus, Ranald A. Barnicot 2017 Barnet and Southgate College, London

To Fabullus (Invitation) By Catullus, Ranald A. Barnicot

Transference

Translated from Latin by Ranald Barnicot


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