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3053 full-text articles. Page 1 of 79.

The_Delian_Hieropoioi_Of_171_Bc.Pdf, Sharon Venter 2017 Reasearching a book on delos

The_Delian_Hieropoioi_Of_171_Bc.Pdf, Sharon Venter

Sharon Venter

No abstract provided.


Tyndarus’ Bilingual Pun And The Ambiguities Of Plautus’ Captivi. (Accepted; Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

Tyndarus’ Bilingual Pun And The Ambiguities Of Plautus’ Captivi. (Accepted; Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

The article argues for a bilingual (Greek/Latin) pun at Plautus' Captivi 229-230, spoken by the principal character, Tyndarus, and places it within the context of his depiction and the generic ambiguity of the play itself.


The First Person Hortatory Subjunctive In New Comedy (Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

The First Person Hortatory Subjunctive In New Comedy (Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

ABSTRACT: Article considers patterns of usage in the type ποιῶμεν  in Menander.


Grand Allusions: Vergil In Phaedrus, Jeremy B. Lefkowitz 2016 Swarthmore College

Grand Allusions: Vergil In Phaedrus, Jeremy B. Lefkowitz

Classics Faculty Works

This article focuses on two allusions to Vergil in the opening of the third book of Phaedrus’ Aesopic fables (3.Prol.) and suggests that Vergilian poetry plays a surprisingly central role in Phaedrus’ reflections on the nature and purpose of his poetic project. By linking his own avowedly humble poetry to the Aeneid and Eclogues, Phaedrus draws attention to some unexpected points of contact with Vergil; but he also quite clearly presents himself as a relatively unimportant poet who has had a particularly difficult time finding acceptance in Rome. The engagements with Vergil thus provide contexts for Phaedrus to highlight ...


Publication In Martial's Time And The Publication Of His Works, Jack Kaufmann 2016 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Publication In Martial's Time And The Publication Of His Works, Jack Kaufmann

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

I have attempted in this thesis to broadly discuss the nature of literary publication in classical times, characterized by (a) the lack of printing presses or any other means to make multiple copies of a work except by writing out each copy by hand, and (b) the lack of any copyright or other protection of a writer’s work. These factors led to a very different concept of publishing than our modern one. I have then focused on the epigrams of Martial (ca. 40 A.D. – 103 A.D.) in particular, because (a) his epigrams contain a wealth of information ...


Judging A Book: For Megan Cook The Value Of A Volume Is More Than The Words On The Page, Gerry Boyle 2016 Colby College

Judging A Book: For Megan Cook The Value Of A Volume Is More Than The Words On The Page, Gerry Boyle

Colby Magazine

Megan Cook doesn’t judge a book by its cover. She also considers the historical context, the manner of binding, the illustrations on the contents page, marginalia penciled in by various owners, food stains that are reminders of someone’s long ago lunchtime reading.


Notebook Vi Plato Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell 2016 Independent Scholar

Notebook Vi Plato Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell

Edward H Campbell

No abstract provided.


Book Review: Keppie, Lawrence. The Making Of The Roman Army: From Republic To Empire. London: B.T. Batsford, 1984., Christopher Sheline 2016 American Public University System

Book Review: Keppie, Lawrence. The Making Of The Roman Army: From Republic To Empire. London: B.T. Batsford, 1984., Christopher Sheline

Saber and Scroll

A review of Lawrence Keppie's The Making of the Roman Army: From Republic to Empire.


The Historiography Of Xenophon, Christopher Sheline 2016 American Public University System

The Historiography Of Xenophon, Christopher Sheline

Saber and Scroll

Historiography is the documented process of written history and, therefore, any change to that process becomes critical to the historiographical timeline, thus sustaining everlasting value. Xenophon (c. 430 BCE-354 BCE), known for his writings on the Persian Wars, Cyrus the Great, and the March of the 10,000, single-handedly produced several changes to historical writing that altered the very essence of historical thought in a way that challenged even the roots of Herodotus and Thucydides. Xenophon stepped away from the influence of Thucydides to demonstrate a more independent, often philosophical, perspective. Through his development of biographies, Xenophon incorporated philosophy into ...


Plato's Apology 17a To 31c (Uncorrected), Edward H. Campbell 2016 Independent Scholar

Plato's Apology 17a To 31c (Uncorrected), Edward H. Campbell

Edward H Campbell

Forensic philology for Plato's Apology 17a to 31c. Work in Progress, 165 pages. As is no warranty.


E. H. Campbell Bozeman Co-Op 3sept16.Png, Edward H. Campbell 2016 Independent Scholar

E. H. Campbell Bozeman Co-Op 3sept16.Png, Edward H. Campbell

Edward H Campbell

No abstract provided.


Evocations Of Byzantium In Zenitist Avant-Garde Architecture, Jelena Bogdanović 2016 Iowa State University

Evocations Of Byzantium In Zenitist Avant-Garde Architecture, Jelena Bogdanović

Architecture Publications

The Byzantine legacy in modern architecture can be divided between a historicist, neo-Byzantine architectural style and an active investigation of the potentials of the Byzantine for a modern, explicitly nontraditional, architecture. References to Byzantium in avantgarde Eastern European architecture of the 1920s employed a modernist interpretation of the Byzantine concept of space that evoked a mode of “medieval” experience and creative practice rather than direct historical quotation. The avant-garde movement of Zenitism, a prominent visionary avant-garde movement in the Balkans, provides a case study in the ways immaterial aspects of Byzantine architecture infiltrated modernism and moved it beyond an academic ...


An Epic Hydrography: Riverine Geography In The Argonautika Of Apollonios Rhodios, Joseph R. Morgan II 2016 Washington University in St. Louis

An Epic Hydrography: Riverine Geography In The Argonautika Of Apollonios Rhodios, Joseph R. Morgan Ii

Arts & Sciences Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The literary record of the Ancient Mediterranean contains untapped potential for the study of the history of spatial representation, a new frontier in the history of geography. The articulation of spatial networks in written form is an integral element of several genres represented in the extant corpus of Greek literature. An analysis of the fabula space of an ancient narrative—the internal geography of the work itself—provides insights into the generic constraints, intertextuality, and contemporaneous geographical concepts that authors drew upon in constructing their particular literary geographies. The Argonautika of Apollonios Rhodios presents a particularly rich fabula space in ...


Poor, Pitiful Monsters From Homer To Borges, Robin McAllister 2016 Sacred Heart University

Poor, Pitiful Monsters From Homer To Borges, Robin Mcallister

English Faculty Publications

This article reviews famous monsters in Western literature that reveal a hidden humanity or affinity with the hero that elicits compassion or emphasizes their bestiality in surprising ways. Their monstrosity is often a distorted mirror image of the hero’s humanity. Shakespeare’s Caliban is a famous example of the affinity between monster and protagonist. Homer’s Polyphemus, the first monster in Western tradition establishes certain traits that persist through later literature: lawless, barbarian, cannibal, and giant. Polyphemus hates men, but loves his old ram. Grendel, Grendel’s mother, and the dragon in Beowulf are giants, lawless, cannibals. The dragon ...


Northwest Coast Native American Art: The Relationship Between Museums, Native Americans And Artists, Karrie E. Myers 2016 State University of New York Buffalo State

Northwest Coast Native American Art: The Relationship Between Museums, Native Americans And Artists, Karrie E. Myers

Museum Studies Theses

Museums today have many responsibilities, including protecting and understanding objects in their care. Many also have relationships with groups of people whose items or artworks are housed within their institutions. This paper explores the relationship between museums and Northwest Coast Native Americans and their artists. Participating museums include those in and out of the Northwest Coast region, such as the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, the Burke Museum, the Royal British Columbia Museum, the American Museum of Natural History and the Smithsonian Museum. Museum professionals who conducted research for some of these museums included Franz Boas ...


The Ideal Vs. The Practical, Joshua Power 2016 La Salle University

The Ideal Vs. The Practical, Joshua Power

The Histories

Ancient Greece is known for its philosophers, playwrights, poets and artists. Ancient Rome is known for its arches, roads, and aqueducts. Throughout their interdependent histories, the ancient Greek and Roman societies shared a vast amount of knowledge and ideas, but the way they used their knowledge varied drastically. The primary difference between the worldview of the Greeks and that of the Romans is that the Romans strove for success through practicality in all of their endeavors. On the other hand, the Greeks, in particular the Athenians were idealists who thought that success would follow moral and academic superiority.


Augustine: Contributor Or Hindrance Of Adversus Iudaeos?, Colin Pierlott 2016 La Salle University

Augustine: Contributor Or Hindrance Of Adversus Iudaeos?, Colin Pierlott

The Histories

Augustine of Hippo, doctor and Saint of the Roman Catholic Church who lived in the Late Antique world from AD 354 to 430, is considered one of the greatest Western theologians of all time, contributing around 120 works of writing that touch numerous topics including apologetics, theology, philosophy, letters, sermons, and other forms of rhetoric/literature. His influence on theology is so profound that “even today he is a quotable authority.” His most notable work, Confessions, which is his own story of how he came to convert to Christianity, is still widely read and referred to today, particularly for religious ...


Obstetrics And Gynecology In The Ancient World, Gracie Joy 2016 La Salle University

Obstetrics And Gynecology In The Ancient World, Gracie Joy

The Histories

Women in the ancient world were subject to ancient practices of medicine. This seems obvious to the reader, however to truly understand what the implications of “ancient practices of medicine” are, one must step out of the realm of today’s technology. Feminine healthcare is something taken advantage of in modernity by many. It has a crucial role in the sustaining of a population, though is frequently overlooked in many cultures of today as nonessential medical practice. This specialization should not be ignored and certainly was not in Ancient Rome. The doctors and midwives and nurses of the time took ...


"Historia Brittonum" And Britain’S Twenty-Eight Cities, Andrew Breeze 2016 Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona

"Historia Brittonum" And Britain’S Twenty-Eight Cities, Andrew Breeze

Journal of Literary Onomastics

Certain versions of the ninth-century _Historia Brittonum_ have an additional chapter (66a), nominally containing a list of "all the cities in the whole of Britain, twenty-eight in number". It has intrigued medieval and modern scholars alike. They have struggled to identify the names as those of Roman Britain's cities, for the most part without success. In the present paper a new approach is tried. While some of the places listed are genuine Roman cities (but also medieval ones), such as Winchester, Carlisle, York, London, Canterbury, or Chester, others are no such thing. They can be shown on the basis ...


Norse "Loki" As Praxonym, William Sayers 2016 Cornell University

Norse "Loki" As Praxonym, William Sayers

Journal of Literary Onomastics

The still debated Old Norse theonym Loki is projected against the wide semantic field of the ON verb lúka "to close", not, as current scholarship would have it, as relevant to Ragnarǫk and the closing down of the divine world but in its judicial applications to successfull negotiated outcomes. The ingenious Loki, the bearer of a praxonym, would then be the inventive Fixer. While this aspect is well illustrated in tales of Loki's ruses and expedients, a more archaic figure emerges when Loki is associated with the reconstructed Indo-European verbal root *lok- "to accuse, blame, prohibit" (cf. Old Frisian ...


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