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Cool: How Air Conditioning Changed Everything [Table Of Contents], Salvatore Basile 2016 Fordham University

Cool: How Air Conditioning Changed Everything [Table Of Contents], Salvatore Basile

History

It’s a contraption that makes the lists of “Greatest Inventions Ever”; at the same time, it’s accused of causing global disaster. It has changed everything from architecture to people’s food habits to their voting patterns, to even the way big business washes its windows. It has saved countless lives . . . while causing countless deaths. Most of us are glad it’s there. But we don’t know how, or when, it got there.

It’s air conditioning.

For thousands of years, humankind attempted to do something about the slow torture of hot weather. Everything was tried: water power ...


The Amazing Adventures Of Bob Brown: A Real-Life Zelig Who Wrote His Way Through The 20th Century [Table Of Contents], Craig Saper 2016 University of Maryland, Baltimore

The Amazing Adventures Of Bob Brown: A Real-Life Zelig Who Wrote His Way Through The 20th Century [Table Of Contents], Craig Saper

Biography

“A cross between an intellectual biography of this literary dynamo and a picaresque novel. Bob Brown has found a sensitive, insightful, and appreciative biographer who knows not only how to narrate (and condense) his amazing adventures but also how to draw the connections that make this overflowing life of letters seem all the more meaningful and significant in our era of digital multimedia.” —Louis Kaplan, Professor of History and Theory of Photography and New Media, University of Toronto


Who Can Afford To Improvise? James Baldwin And Black Music, The Lyric And The Listeners [Table Of Contents], Ed Pavlic 2015 University of Georgia

Who Can Afford To Improvise? James Baldwin And Black Music, The Lyric And The Listeners [Table Of Contents], Ed Pavlic

Literature

More than a quarter-century after his death, James Baldwin remains an unparalleled figure in American literature and African American cultural politics. In Who Can Afford to Improvise? Ed Pavlić offers an unconventional, lyrical, and accessible meditation on the life, writings, and legacy of James Baldwin and their relationship to the lyric tradition in black music, from gospel and blues to jazz and R&B. Based on unprecedented access to private correspondence, unpublished manuscripts and attuned to a musically inclined poet’s skill in close listening, Who Can Afford to Improvise? frames a new narrative of James Baldwin’s work and ...


Review Of Pioneer Girl, By Bich Minh Nguyen, Quan-Manh Ha 2015 University of Montana - Missoula

Review Of Pioneer Girl, By Bich Minh Nguyen, Quan-Manh Ha

Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies

DNA


Fictional And Fragmented Truths In Korean Adoptee Life Writing, Jenny Heijun Wills 2015 University of Winnipeg

Fictional And Fragmented Truths In Korean Adoptee Life Writing, Jenny Heijun Wills

Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies

This article explores the ways that life writing allows transnational, transracial Asian adoptee authors to navigate their complex experiences of truth and authenticity. It also addresses the transformations adoptee authors make to the memoir genre in order to accommodate the particularities of their experiences. I analyze Jane Jeong Trenka’s foundational Asian adoption memoir, The Language of Blood, and Kim Sunée’s lesser-known text, Trail of Crumbs, paying attention to the ways that the authors’ hybridized and deliberately constructionist approaches to genre parallel some of the identity issues that are brought out in their respective books. I explore the significance ...


“’Chinese Don’T Drink Coffee!’”: Coffee And Class Liminality In Elaine Mar’S Paper Daughter, Christian Aguiar 2015 Georgetown University

“’Chinese Don’T Drink Coffee!’”: Coffee And Class Liminality In Elaine Mar’S Paper Daughter, Christian Aguiar

Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies

This article offers a reading of the foodservice spaces in Elaine Mar’s memoir Paper Daughter in order to suggest changes in the way we think about class liminality. It argues that by focusing not just on the way the socially-mobile narrator experiences liminality, but also on the ways her working-class parents and co-workers experience it, we can begin to consider some of the complexities and nuances the idea of the liminal offers. In so doing, the article suggests a slightly new approach to thinking about and teaching Paper Daughter.


From Raw To Cooked: Amy Tan’S “Fish Cheeks” Through A Lévi-Straussian Lens, Susan K. Kevra 2015 Vanderbilt University

From Raw To Cooked: Amy Tan’S “Fish Cheeks” Through A Lévi-Straussian Lens, Susan K. Kevra

Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies

In "Fish Cheeks" a scant 500 words short story, Amy Tan serves up a coming of age story about an Asian American teenage girl. Tan’s setting of Christmas for a traditional Chinese dinner, shared with the American boy on whom the protagonist, Amy, has a crush, emphasizes the girl’s dual identity as an Asian American, a reality she is confronting head on. Forced to see her family traditions through the eyes of a white, Christian boy, she finds those traditions distasteful. Rather than delighting in the dishes her mother has lovingly prepared, she is revolted by them, fixated ...


The Illegible Pan: Racial Formation, Hybridity, And Chinatown In Sui Sin Far’S “‘Its Wavering Image’”, Caroline Porter 2015 University of Kansas

The Illegible Pan: Racial Formation, Hybridity, And Chinatown In Sui Sin Far’S “‘Its Wavering Image’”, Caroline Porter

Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies

Drawing upon Judith Butler’s theory of performativity, this article offers an interpretation of “‘Its Wavering Image’” that explains the biracial main character, Pan’s, process of racialization. The argument is two fold: first, the paper contends that in this story, Sui Sin Far theorizes that race is performative rather than biological. Race does not come from characters’ bodies, but is rather an incorporated performance of codes. Pan’s race, then, depends not on her parentage or her biology, but on the “codes” she internalizes and embodies, codes that are fleshed out throughout the article through historical contextualization of San ...


A “Monstress” Undertaking: An Interview With Lysley Tenorio, Noelle Brada-Williams 2015 San Jose State University

A “Monstress” Undertaking: An Interview With Lysley Tenorio, Noelle Brada-Williams

Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies

No abstract provided.


Introduction To Volume Six: An Identity Rebus, Noelle Brada-Williams 2015 San Jose State University

Introduction To Volume Six: An Identity Rebus, Noelle Brada-Williams

Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies

No abstract provided.


Volume 6 Cover, Mark P. Brada 2015 The Harker School

Volume 6 Cover, Mark P. Brada

Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies

No abstract provided.


Arnow, Harriette Louisa (Simpson), 1908-1986, Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2015 Western Kentucky University

Arnow, Harriette Louisa (Simpson), 1908-1986, Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding Aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 2936. Letter, 6 March 1964, of Harriette Simpson Arnow, Ann Arbor, Michigan, to “Mrs. Holland,” in reponse to a compliment for her novel Hunter’s Horn. Arnow briefly recalls her publications since The Dollmaker and notes “unenthusiastic” reviews in Kentucky of her most recent work. She also mentions an article about her in the previous fall’s Louisville Courier-Journal Magazine.


Summers, Hollis Spurgeon, 1916-1987 (Sc 2935), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2015 Western Kentucky University

Summers, Hollis Spurgeon, 1916-1987 (Sc 2935), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding Aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 2935. Letter, 8 April 1953, of Hollis Summers, Lexington, Kentucky, to Frances Richards, a member of the WKU English faculty, expressing good wishes to her and her students after his recent visit to Bowling Green, Kentucky.


A Poetic Poioumenon: Coterie And Ekphrasis In David Lehman's "The Breeders' Cup", Anna Beth Rowe 2015 University of Southern Mississippi

A Poetic Poioumenon: Coterie And Ekphrasis In David Lehman's "The Breeders' Cup", Anna Beth Rowe

Master's Theses

David Lehman’s poem “The Breeders’ Cup” uses cross-generational coterie and ekphrasis to create a poetic poioumenon. When read in terms of art criticism, Lehman’s “The Breeders’ Cup” models creative processes from the past and calls for a rehabilitative ethic in postmodern poetics. Lehman follows the ekphrastic form, which associates a poem with a work of visual art, from his New York School predecessor Frank O’Hara. “The Breeders’ Cup” addresses Édouard Manet’s 1865 painting Olympia through ekphrasis, and the painting of a prostitute becomes a patron saint of parody for postmodern poetics. The poem introduces lust as ...


Sonic Stereotypes: Jazz And Racial Signification In American Film And Television Soundtracks, Kyle Jackson 2015 Western University

Sonic Stereotypes: Jazz And Racial Signification In American Film And Television Soundtracks, Kyle Jackson

Nota Bene: Canadian Undergraduate Journal of Musicology

This paper examines the use of jazz in contemporary American film and television soundtracks. Through processes of cultural signification, jazz music frequently maps racialized meaning onto the narrative. Often, a “black” jazz aesthetic signifies social and sexual deviance, while a “white” jazz aesthetic signifies elegance and high-culture. Such associations reinforce racial boundaries and essentialist stereotypes by perpetuating a dichotomy in which “blackness” figures as culturally dangerous (e.g. sexually deviant, unrestrained, threatening, and low-class) and “whiteness” as elite and culturally superior (e.g. civilized, educated, and high-class). To demonstrate this, the soundtracks of Anthony Minghella’s The Talented Mr. Ripley ...


“It Didn’T Even Hurt”: Temple Drake’S And Sula Peace’S Resurrections, Brittany J. Barron 2015 University of North Georgia

“It Didn’T Even Hurt”: Temple Drake’S And Sula Peace’S Resurrections, Brittany J. Barron

Papers and Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

In William Faulkner’s Sanctuary and Toni Morrison’s Sula, the female characters encounter life-changing traumas that challenge Southern ideas regarding womanhood. While many scholars examine the similarities between other Faulkner and Morrison texts, such as Absalom, Absalom! and Beloved, they overlook the parallels between heroines Temple Drake and Sula Peace, who reverse racial roles when Temple, an aristocratic white woman, is raped, and Sula, a black woman, is not. According to Mae C. King, from 1891 to 1921, during the time period that Sanctuary and part of Sula are set, “Rape of the black woman was ‘as common as ...


Culture On The Move: Depression-Era Documentary And Migrant California, Joseph Entin 2015 Brooklyn College, CUNY

Culture On The Move: Depression-Era Documentary And Migrant California, Joseph Entin

Criticism

California on the Breadlines: Dorothea Lange, Paul Taylor, and the Making of a New Deal Narrative by Jan Goggans. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010. Pp. 368. $40.00 cloth.


Big Hero 6: Animation And Heart At Its Finest, Kaela Bedard 2015 Goodwin College

Big Hero 6: Animation And Heart At Its Finest, Kaela Bedard

General Education Student Publications

No abstract provided.


Murton, Jessie Wilmore (Jones), 1886-1973 (Mss 439), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2015 Western Kentucky University

Murton, Jessie Wilmore (Jones), 1886-1973 (Mss 439), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 439. Correspondence, writings, scrapbooks, and financial records of Kentucky native and poet Jessie Wilmore Murton. Although born and raised in Kentucky, she spent most of her adult life in Battle Creek, Michigan. Her poetry and prose was published in several solo books and anthologies and appeared extensively in religious publications of the mid-twentieth century.


Woody Guthrie, America's Merry Prankster, Kristin Lems 2015 National-Louis University

Woody Guthrie, America's Merry Prankster, Kristin Lems

Faculty Publications

A “merry prankster” is a colorful person, real or legendary, who pokes fun at authority and the rich, powerful, and arrogant. The merry prankster appears small and powerless, but manages to outwit his opponents, often summing up the situation with witty one-liners — signal examples from medieval history and folklore are Mullah Nasreddin and Till Eugenspiel. In many ways, Woody Guthrie is an American merry prankster. Small in stature but large of intelligence, he used his wits, musical creativity, and people skills to defend the poor against the rich and powerful. He consistently made enemies of the privileged and those in ...


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