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"The Falling Man" As Viewed In The Lens Of The "Public Sphere", Laura Reinacher 2014 California Polytechnic State University

"The Falling Man" As Viewed In The Lens Of The "Public Sphere", Laura Reinacher

Communication Studies

No abstract provided.


Cultivating Better Brains: Transhumanism And Its Critics On The Ethics Of Enhancement Via Brain-Computer Interfacing, Matthew Devlin 2014 Western University

Cultivating Better Brains: Transhumanism And Its Critics On The Ethics Of Enhancement Via Brain-Computer Interfacing, Matthew Devlin

University of Western Ontario - Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Transhumanists contend that enhancing the human brain—a subfield of human enhancement called cognitive enhancement—is both a crucial and desirable pursuit toward cultivating a better world. The discussion thus far has almost entirely focused on cognitive enhancement through genetic engineering and pharmaceuticals, both of which fall within the realm of medicine and are thus subject to restrictive policies for both ethical development and distribution. This thesis argues that cognitive enhancement through brain-computer interfacing (BCI), despite being considered like any other form of cognitive enhancement, is developing outside of medical ethics, and is on track to avoid myriad legal and ...


“Gender Flip-Flopping In Hitchcock”: A Closer Look At Rear Window, Vertigo And Psycho, Nicole A. Motahari 2014 Georgia State University

“Gender Flip-Flopping In Hitchcock”: A Closer Look At Rear Window, Vertigo And Psycho, Nicole A. Motahari

Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference

No abstract provided.


“Dreams Are My Reality:” The Duality In Christopher Nolan’S Inception, Helen O'Brien 2014 Lake Forest College

“Dreams Are My Reality:” The Duality In Christopher Nolan’S Inception, Helen O'Brien

Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

A cerebral take on the classic heist film, Inception posits the wild premise that one can steal secrets through dreams, but makes it convincing by placing this thievery in the hands of interesting characters in the realistic world of corporate espionage. The audience enjoys the ride, but they are left questioning the ending; was it really a dream or was it reality? Director Christopher Nolan takes advantage of every cinematic tool to bring the dream world into reality, and ultimately argues that the two worlds are not as different as one might hope.


Marshall University Special Collections Photo Preservation Workshop, Caitlin Noelle Walker, Nat DeBruin 2014 Marshall University

Marshall University Special Collections Photo Preservation Workshop, Caitlin Noelle Walker, Nat Debruin

Libraries Faculty Research

Workshop presented at the West Virginia Library Conference in Flatwoods, WV on April 2, 2014. The workshop focused on the history of photography with an emphasis on identifying different types of photographic processes and images. The second half of the workshop provided the participants with knowledge about the environmental and chemical challenges to preserving photographic images and possible solutions to solving problems in their institution's collections.


Committed To Memory: Remembering "9/11" As A Crisis Of Education, Karen Espiritu 2014 McMaster University

Committed To Memory: Remembering "9/11" As A Crisis Of Education, Karen Espiritu

Open Access Dissertations and Theses

This study considers the pedagogical significance of mourning and remembrance in the context of the commemorative culture surrounding the “9/11” attacks on America, which have stimulated recent explorations of what it might mean to commit to ethical remembrances of the dead. Critical of “9/11” memorial discourses that provide justifications for heightened “homeland” security and military mobilization in the “War on Terror,” this project not only addresses the educative force of memorial-artistic responses in creating meaning out of mass deaths, but also dissociates the concept of the public memorial as foremost an apparatus of the state, private corporations, and ...


"Not Just A Common Criminal": The Case For Sentencing Mitigation Videos, Regina Austin 2014 University of Pennsylvania Law School

"Not Just A Common Criminal": The Case For Sentencing Mitigation Videos, Regina Austin

Faculty Scholarship

Sentencing mitigation or sentencing videos are a form of visual legal advocacy that is produced on behalf of defendants for use in the sentencing phases of criminal cases (from charging to clemency). The videos are typically short (5 to 10 minutes or so) nonfiction films that explore a defendant’s background, character, and family situation with the aim of raising factual and moral issues that support the argument for a shorter or more lenient sentence. Very few examples of mitigation videos are in the public domain and available for viewing. This article provides a complete analysis of the constituent elements ...


Transitional Violence In King Of New York, Soren G. Palmer 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

Transitional Violence In King Of New York, Soren G. Palmer

Journal of Religion & Film

Abel Ferrara’s violent and controversial film, King Of New York, follows the escalating violence and resulting trail of corpses between mobster Frank White (a psychotic sort of Robin Hood) and a group of detectives attempting to arrest him. The goal of this paper is to utilize Elizabeth Swanson Goldberg’s grammar of transition as a structural device to identify negative connections that highlight and foreshadow sources of violence in King of New York. However, simply noting the process of these transitions is insufficient to the paper’s broader purpose; if one is to investigate the causal elements of violence ...


The Virgin Mary On Screen: Mater Dei Or Just A Mother In Guido Chiesa’S Io Sono Con Te (I Am With You), Timothy J. Johnson, Barbara Ottaviani-Jones 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

The Virgin Mary On Screen: Mater Dei Or Just A Mother In Guido Chiesa’S Io Sono Con Te (I Am With You), Timothy J. Johnson, Barbara Ottaviani-Jones

Journal of Religion & Film

Guido Chiesa’s Io Sono con Te (I Am with You) offers a unique, albeit controversial take on Mary, the mother of Jesus. Filmed in Tunisia, and subject to criticism by Italian Catholic authorities and film critics alike, Io Sono con Te presents a rich anthropological-theological reflection on religion, culture, gender, and sacrifice. Not surprisingly, Chiesa draws on René Girard’s scapegoat theory throughout his film as he fashions Mary as the forceful protagonist in a familiar yet controversial story.



Preaching In The Darkness: The Night Of The Hunter’S Subversion Of Patriarchal Christianity And Classical Cinema, Carl Laamanen 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

Preaching In The Darkness: The Night Of The Hunter’S Subversion Of Patriarchal Christianity And Classical Cinema, Carl Laamanen

Journal of Religion & Film

Upon its release in 1955, The Night of the Hunter did not find favor among audiences or critics, who failed to appreciate Charles Laughton’s vision for the Davis Grubb’s bestselling novel of the same title. While poor marketing certainly played into the film’s colossal collapse at the box office, I believe there is a deeper reason behind the rejection of the film in the 1950s—its portrayal of women and the female voice. In The Night of the Hunter, Miz Cooper (Lillian Gish) ultimately defeats Harry Powell (Robert Mitchum), the corrupt Preacher, through the use of her ...


The Holy Fool In Late Tarkovsky, Robert O. Efird 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

The Holy Fool In Late Tarkovsky, Robert O. Efird

Journal of Religion & Film

This article analyzes the Russian cultural and religious phenomenon of holy foolishness (iurodstvo) in director Andrei Tarkovsky’s last two films, Nostalghia and Sacrifice. While traits of the holy fool appear in various characters throughout the director’s oeuvre, a marked change occurs in the films made outside the Soviet Union. Coincident with the films’ increasing disregard for spatiotemporal consistency and sharper eschatological focus, the character of the fool now appears to veer off into genuine insanity, albeit with a seemingly greater sensitivity to a visionary or virtual world of the spirit and explicit messianic task.


“Love, What Have You Done To Me?” Eros And Agape In Alfred Hitchcock's I Confess, Catherine M. O'Brien 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

“Love, What Have You Done To Me?” Eros And Agape In Alfred Hitchcock's I Confess, Catherine M. O'Brien

Journal of Religion & Film

Despite its pre-Vatican II setting, Alfred Hitchcock’s I Confess (1953) has retained a notable relevance in the twenty-first century. Although the titular act of confession is unsurprisingly significant, the diegesis actually foregrounds Matrimony and Holy Orders – two sacraments that remain under the spotlight during a tumultuous era for the Catholic Church. Alongside the traditional Hitchcockian theme of “an innocent man wrongly accused,” the plot really hinges on love – a subject that is intelligible to people of all religions and none. While examining the mise-en-scène of the director’s most Catholic film, this article offers an exploration of I Confess ...


Filming Reconciliation: Affect And Nostalgia In The Tree Of Life, M. Gail Hamner 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

Filming Reconciliation: Affect And Nostalgia In The Tree Of Life, M. Gail Hamner

Journal of Religion & Film

This paper uses the affect theory of Gilles Deleuze, Raymond Williams, and Lauren Berlant, and the phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty to examine how affect constellates to film Christian reconciliation in Terrence Malick’s 2011 release, The Tree of Life. As a working shorthand, we can understand affect as the fungible set of bodily processes that affirm, sear, or reshape a body’s and society’s relational structures. I contend that the film’s fluid montage—analyzed with Deleuzian film theory—generates a non-reactionary nostalgia that binds Christian theological hope to the persistent melancholy of loss through the blurring of perception, memory ...


Closing The Loop: "The Promise And Threat Of The Sacred" In Rian Johnson’S Looper, Brian W. Nail 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

Closing The Loop: "The Promise And Threat Of The Sacred" In Rian Johnson’S Looper, Brian W. Nail

Journal of Religion & Film

This article examines the ways in which Rian Johnson’s recent film Looper (2012) portrays the complex relationship between violence and the sacred in contemporary society through its exploration of the theme of retribution. Utilizing René Girard’s theory of sacrifice and Roberto Esposito’s explication of the immunitary logic of the sacred, this study argues that the film reveals the double nature of the sacred as a source of both life and death within society. Through an examination of crucial elements of Looper’s plot and setting, and in particular its enigmatic climax, I argue that as a religious ...


Plato's Watermelon: Art And Illusion In The Brothers Bloom, David L. Smith 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

Plato's Watermelon: Art And Illusion In The Brothers Bloom, David L. Smith

Journal of Religion & Film

Rian Johnson’s The Brothers Bloom is a sophisticated film about storytelling, pitting the idea that stories are an enhancement of life against the suspicion that stories are a deception. Set in a world of con artistry and illusion, it raises issues similar to those introduced in Plato’s allegory of the cave and in the critique of religion as illusion. Specifically, it follows one character’s desire for an “unwritten life”—a life free from artifice—through various logical and interpersonal challenges, and ends with a profound meditation on the coinherence of faith and skepticism.


Uno Native Film Festival, Brady DeSanti, Michele M. Desmarais, Beth R. Ritter 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

Uno Native Film Festival, Brady Desanti, Michele M. Desmarais, Beth R. Ritter

Journal of Religion & Film

This is the first year for the University of Nebraska at Omaha Native Film Festival. The Festival was presented Nov. 1-3, 2013, by the Native American Studies Program of the University of Nebraska at Omaha and Vision Maker Media. In addition to the movies reviewed below, the Festival included a program of children/family films, a program of short films, an acting workshop with Chaske Spencer (Lakota Sioux), and a workshop on how to use visual media in the classroom presented by Vision Maker Media. Vision Maker Media is a non-profit organization that shares Native stories with the world by ...


Scoring Transcendence: Contemporary Film Music As Religious Experience, Brandon A. Konecny 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

Scoring Transcendence: Contemporary Film Music As Religious Experience, Brandon A. Konecny

Journal of Religion & Film

An earlier version of this book review appeared in Film Interernational, Nov. 13, 2013 (http://filmint.nu/?p=10038). It appears here by permission.


Intertextuality In Beckett's And Ağaoğlu's Work, Elmas Şahín 2014 Purdue University

Intertextuality In Beckett's And Ağaoğlu's Work, Elmas Şahín

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article "Intertextuality in Beckett's and Ağaoğlu's Work" Elmas Şahín discusses Adalet Ağaoğlu's 1973 novel Ölmeye Yatmak (Lying Down to Die) and Samuel Beckett's 1950 Malone Dies in terms of intertextuality. Şahín employs tenets of comparative literature in order to analyze the two texts with regard to form and content and focuses on the on protagonists' worlds. In Şahín's interpretation, Ağaoğlu's protagonist Aysel is narrated in postmodern intertextuality as an individual of our days alienated from society, searching for her self/selves as she cannot succeed in dying. Both Beckett's and Ağaoğlu ...


Subjectivity In 'Attār's Shaykh Of San'Ān Story In The Conference Of The Birds, Claudia Yaghoobi 2014 Purdue University

Subjectivity In 'Attār's Shaykh Of San'Ān Story In The Conference Of The Birds, Claudia Yaghoobi

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article "Subjectivity in 'Attār’s Shaykh of San'ān Story in The Conference of the Birds" Claudia Yaghoobi discusses intersections of transgression, law, inclusion and exclusion, self and Other in Farīd al-Dīn 'Attār's (1142?-ca.1220) treatment of religion with regard to Shaykh San'ān and the Christian girl's love story in The Conference of the Birds. San'ān is an ascetic master who has never transgressed any of the Islamic laws until he embarks on a journey from Mecca to Rome after a dream only to fall in love with a Christian girl, convert to ...


History And Identity In Post-Totalitarian Memoir Writing In Romanian, Nicoleta D. Ifrim 2014 Purdue University

History And Identity In Post-Totalitarian Memoir Writing In Romanian, Nicoleta D. Ifrim

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article "History and Identity in Post-Totalitarian Memoir Writing in Romanian" Nicoleta D. Ifrim analyzes Virgil Tănase's confessional and ego-graphic writing in his 2011 Leapșa pe murite (Playing Fetch with Death). Tănase's text is about the individual caught in history and re-writes it post-traumatically from a double perspective: that of the collective memory of totalitarianism and the personal thus functioning as a filtering mechanism for the creation of meta-historical identity. For Tănase, the experience of exile and post-exile, as well as the confrontation with the West legitimizes identity dilemmas and the construction of the individual. The book ...


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