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Arguments Against Peter Klein's Infinitism, Jason A Dewitt 2017 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Arguments Against Peter Klein's Infinitism, Jason A Dewitt

University of Tennessee Honors Thesis Projects

No abstract provided.


Mereological Idealism, Kenneth Pearce 2016 Valparaiso University

Mereological Idealism, Kenneth Pearce

Kenneth L Pearce

No abstract provided.


Comments On Joseph Chan, Confucian Perfectionism, Stephen C. Angle 2016 Wesleyan University

Comments On Joseph Chan, Confucian Perfectionism, Stephen C. Angle

Stephen C. Angle

I approach this encounter with Joseph Chan’s important work on Confucian perfectionism from a fundamentally sympathetic standpoint. Most basically, I agree with two of his key premises. Confucianism is more than a rich historical tradition: it is a live strand of political (and other types of) theory, able to criticize and contribute to our lives today. But for modern Confucianism to be plausible and attractive, it must find a way to embrace the idea of limited government or constitutionalism in a deeper fashion than it did historically. There are many other issues that Joseph covers in his book, and ...


Buddhism And Zhu Xi’S Epistemology, Stephen C. Angle 2016 Wesleyan University

Buddhism And Zhu Xi’S Epistemology, Stephen C. Angle

Stephen C. Angle

There are at least superficial reasons for thinking that Zhu Xi’s epistemology is significantly influenced by Chinese Buddhism. For one thing, in his youth Zhu studied with Kaishan Daoqian 開善道謙 (d. 1150?), a leading disciple of the most influential Chan teacher of the era, Dahui Zonggao大慧宗杲 (1089-1163). For another, his discussions of epistemology lean heavily on terms like “genuine knowing 真知” that also figure significantly in Buddhist discussions. As is well known, subsequent critics of the Daoxue movement with which Zhu was centrally associated regularly accused it of being strongly colored by Buddhism. Finally, modern scholars have also ...


Implicit Bias, Resp, Moral Ecology.Pdf, Manuel R. Vargas 2016 University of San Francisco

Implicit Bias, Resp, Moral Ecology.Pdf, Manuel R. Vargas

Manuel Vargas

Roughly, implicit bias is a partially unconscious and partially automatic (frequently negative) evaluative tendency directed at individuals, based on their apparent membership in a socially salient category or group. It is unclear what we should think about an agent’s blameworthiness for actions produced in part by implicit biases, and there are reasons that weigh both in favor and against holding that such agents are blameworthy. There is also a more radical possibility lurking: implicit bias may reveal the limitations of a widespread conception of agency. That is, perhaps implicit bias (maybe along with various other results from the cognitive ...


Ecopsychology Revisited: For Whom Do The “Nature” Bells Toll? (In Progress), Jorge Conesa-Sevilla 2016 European Ecopsychology Society

Ecopsychology Revisited: For Whom Do The “Nature” Bells Toll? (In Progress), Jorge Conesa-Sevilla

Jorge Conesa-Sevilla PhD

"[...] A recurring theme in “ecopsychology,” in its present and inchoate form, is the continuation and extension of “spirit” in juxtaposition with other privileged and/or habitually preferred (perhaps even psychologically needed) practices or causes (spirituality-somethings, farcical chemistry or physics, yoga, coopted and partially understood indigenous lore, extreme diets, and various fetishes). That these mostly emotion-laden, unreasoned, and/or idiosyncratic amalgamations are prevalent says more about the psychological needs of the persons espousing these sentiments or beliefs (their hobbies or interests) than about “nature.” Certainly, it is nothing new that humans project their hopes, desperations, and wish-fulfillment thinking onto the shifting ...


Imagine No Religion: How Modern Abstractions Hide Ancient Realities [Table Of Contents], Carlin A. Barton, Daniel Boyarin 2016 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Imagine No Religion: How Modern Abstractions Hide Ancient Realities [Table Of Contents], Carlin A. Barton, Daniel Boyarin

Religion

“A timely contribution to a growing and important conversation about the inadequacy of our common category ‘religion’ for the understanding of many practices, attitudes, emotions, and beliefs—especially of peoples in other times and contexts—that we usually classify as ‘religion.’” —Wayne A. Meeks, Yale University


Think, Pig! Beckett At The Limit Of The Human [Table Of Contents], Jean-Michel Rabate 2016 University of Pennsylvania

Think, Pig! Beckett At The Limit Of The Human [Table Of Contents], Jean-Michel Rabate

Literature

“Very few critics have all the qualities and competencies required to engage fully with the entirety of Beckett’s work in all genres: a detailed familiarity with Beckett’s texts in both English and French; a sensitivity to his linguistic, stylistic, and thematic maneuvers; an encyclopedic knowledge of his intellectual context; an awareness of the range and detail of Beckett studies; and an ability to write with refinement and wit. It is clear from this remarkable book that Jean-Michel Rabaté is one of those few.” —Derek Attridge, University of York


Art As Display, Frank M. Boardman 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Art As Display, Frank M. Boardman

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Art is essentially a type of display. As an activity, art is what we do when we display objects with certain intentions. As a set of objects, art is all of those things that are displayed for those purposes. The artworld is the social atmosphere that surrounds this particular activity of display. And a history of art is an evolving narrative of change in the practice of this sort of display.

Specifically, to focus for convenience on art as a set of objects, this is what we can call the “displayed-object thesis”:

x is a work of art iff: (a ...


The C3 Conditional: A Variably Strict Ordinary-Language Conditional, Monique L. Whitaker 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

The C3 Conditional: A Variably Strict Ordinary-Language Conditional, Monique L. Whitaker

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

In this dissertation I provide a novel logic of the ordinary-language conditional. First, however, I endeavor to make clearer and more precise just what the objects of the study of the conditional are, as a lack of clarity as to what counts as an instance of a given category of conditional has resulted in deep and significant confusions in subsequent analysis. I motivate for a factual/counterfactual distinction, though not at the level of particular instances of the conditional. Instead, I argue that each individual instance of the conditional may be interpreted either factually or counterfactually, rather than these instances ...


Actions, Reasons And Self-Expression: A Defense Of Subjectivist-Internalism About Reasons, Carolyn P. Plunkett 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Actions, Reasons And Self-Expression: A Defense Of Subjectivist-Internalism About Reasons, Carolyn P. Plunkett

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

The central question of my dissertation is: what makes it the case that certain considerations are reasons for acting? This is a question about the truth-makers of claims about reasons, that is, what makes it the case that one has a reason to Φ rather than Ψ. There are two leading camps in the philosophical debate devoted to answering this question: subjectivism and objectivism. Subjectivist theories hold that one has a reason to do something when one has a non-truth evaluable favoring attitude towards that thing, e.g. desiring it. Objectivist theories insist that one’s desires are irrelevant to ...


Construing Character: Virtue As A Cognitive-Affective Processing System, Denise Vigani 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Construing Character: Virtue As A Cognitive-Affective Processing System, Denise Vigani

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This dissertation, Construing Character: Virtue as a Cognitive-Affective Processing System, develops an empirically plausible account of neo-Aristotelian virtue based on the psychological model of personality as a cognitive-affective processing system. The psychological model holds that an individual’s subjective construal of a situation is crucial to understanding that individual’s behavior. The account of virtue developed in the dissertation begins, therefore, with an elaboration of the distinctive way in which the virtuous person construes situations, which is used to develop and defend a McDowellian view of practical reasoning. Aristotle’s method of individuating the virtues is defended and employed to ...


Philosophers On Prostitution’S Decriminalization, Rebecca Whisnant 2016 University of Dayton

Philosophers On Prostitution’S Decriminalization, Rebecca Whisnant

Rebecca Whisnant

The decriminalization of sex work is currently being discussed around the world. Daily Nous invited a number of philosophers to join this public discussion here, with brief contributions that clarify some of its central issues and disputes.

The idea of the “Philosophers On” series is to prompt further discussion among philosophers about issues and events of current public interest, and also to explore the ways in which philosophers can add, with their characteristically insightful and careful modes of thinking, to the public conversation.


Feminist Perspectives On Rape, Rebecca Whisnant 2016 University of Dayton

Feminist Perspectives On Rape, Rebecca Whisnant

Rebecca Whisnant

Although the proper definition of rape is itself a matter of some dispute, rape is generally understood to involve sexual penetration of a person by force and/or without that person's consent. Rape is committed overwhelmingly by men and boys, usually against women and girls, and sometimes against other men and boys. (For the most part, this entry will assume male perpetrators and female victims.)

Virtually all feminists agree that rape is a grave wrong, one too often ignored, mischaracterized, and legitimized. Feminists differ, however, about how the crime of rape is best understood, and about how rape should ...


Global Feminist Ethics: Feminist Ethics And Social Theory, Rebecca Whisnant, Peggy DesAutels 2016 University of Dayton

Global Feminist Ethics: Feminist Ethics And Social Theory, Rebecca Whisnant, Peggy Desautels

Rebecca Whisnant

This volume contains four sections, the first of which examines some of the special moral concerns that arise from assigning distinct activities and responsibilities to women and men respectively. It is difficult to argue against the view that women and not men are the birth-givers. But it is also true that death rates tied to pregnancy and birth-giving are unacceptably high in developing countries. Are women better off giving birth in hospitals with attending physicians (often male) or in homes with attending midwives (usually female)? Which approach should be "exported" to the developing world?

In the first chapter, "Exporting Childbirth ...


Pornography And Humiliation, Rebecca Whisnant 2016 University of Dayton

Pornography And Humiliation, Rebecca Whisnant

Rebecca Whisnant

In discussions about pornography, the boundary of the harmful and unacceptable is, for many, the lack of consent. But my brief analysis here shows that this is a dangerous simplification. Images of women who accept and even welcome their own humiliation and degradation are deeply destructive, not only for the women portrayed, but for women in general.


'But What About Feminist Porn?' Examining The Work Of Tristan Taormino, Rebecca Whisnant 2016 University of Dayton

'But What About Feminist Porn?' Examining The Work Of Tristan Taormino, Rebecca Whisnant

Rebecca Whisnant

This article examines the work of Tristan Taormino, a prominent self-described feminist pornographer, in order to illustrate themes and commitments common among those who produce, perform in, and/or support feminist pornography. I argue that her work is burdened by thin and limited conceptions of feminism, authenticity, and sexual ethics, as well as by the profit-based exigencies of producing “feminist porn” within the mainstream pornography industry. I conclude that, if indeed feminist pornography is possible, Taormino’s work falls far short of the mark. Public Health Significance Statement: This study suggests that Taormino’s pornographic films are unlikely to have ...


I Do Not Pray, So I Paint, Candice J. Block 2016 Washington University in St. Louis

I Do Not Pray, So I Paint, Candice J. Block

Graduate School of Art Theses

This thesis is a back and forth conversation I have with myself, my work, and a departed friend. These words thread together a belief, and lack of belief in an ontological infinity. I discuss how the loss of a friend relates to my work and my ever-changing thoughts in regards an eternity that I view as impalpable. Throughout my studio practice and poetry, I create a personal symbolic system in order to soothe my ephemeral thoughts around my knowledge of mortality. This system of iconography and meaning eases my ever-questioning secular mind as I try to find significance in life ...


Humanity’S Capability Of Transcendence Through Artificial Intelligence, Zena McCartney 2016 California State University, Monterey Bay

Humanity’S Capability Of Transcendence Through Artificial Intelligence, Zena Mccartney

Capstones and Theses

In the 21st century artificial intelligence (AI) technologies such as robots, mind uploading and cyborgs have probed at these questions:

Who is in control the machine or human?

What is the purpose of autonomous robots to humanity?

If a machine can pass the Turing Test then is it appropriate to be in society acting on free will?

How would a robot understand how to make someone feel loved?

Do their deep expressions of understanding the human condition make them like us?

Once a human has a cyborg technology are they then human or machine?

How and why would we want ...


Producing Knowledge: The Social Made Visible In The Division Of Environmental Biology Of The National Science Foundation, Patrick Southern 2016 SIT Graduate Institute

Producing Knowledge: The Social Made Visible In The Division Of Environmental Biology Of The National Science Foundation, Patrick Southern

Capstone Collection

This inquiry explores how knowledge is produced in the Division of Environmental Biology (DEB) of the National Science Foundation. Beginning from a poststructuralist understanding of science as firmly embedded in the unequal relations of society, this study sought to examine how the policies and procedures of funding research proposals in DEB influence and are influenced by those relations. Using an institutional ethnography approach to analysis, data were collected from analyzing publicly available texts from the division, NSF, Congress, the Office of Management and Budget, and the research community. The analysis demonstrates how the activities of DEB could maintain or exacerbate ...


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