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Human Rights In Chinese Tradition, Stephen C. Angle 2017 Wesleyan University

Human Rights In Chinese Tradition, Stephen C. Angle

Stephen C. Angle

This chapter -- prepared for Sarah Biddulph and Joshua Rosenzweig , eds., Handbook on human rights in China (Edward Elgar, forthcoming) -- examines three different approaches: the Chinese tradition is (1) an obstacle to human rights, (2) an alternative to human rights, or (3) a source of human rights. While some scholars have insisted on one or another of these approaches, I will argue here that there is truth in all of them. Nothing about the Chinese tradition determines, once-and-for-all, what modern Chinese must think about human rights, but there is no question that it has had, and will continue to have, varying ...


Tian As Cosmos In Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucianism, Stephen C. Angle 2017 Wesleyan University

Tian As Cosmos In Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucianism, Stephen C. Angle

Stephen C. Angle


Tian” is central to the metaphysics, cosmology, and ethics of the eight-hundred-year-long Chinese philosophical tradition we call “Neo-Confucianism,” but there is considerable confusion over what tian means—confusion which is exacerbated by its standard translation into English as “Heaven.” This essay analyzes the meaning of tian in the works of the most influential Neo-Confucian, Zhu Xi (1130-1200), presents a coherent interpretation that unifies the disparate aspects of the term’s meaning, and argues that “cosmos” does an excellent job of capturing this meaning, and therefore should be adopted as our translation of tian.


Norm-Expressivism And Regress, Attila Tanyi 2017 University of Liverpool

Norm-Expressivism And Regress, Attila Tanyi

Attila Tanyi

This paper aims to investigate Allan Gibbard’s norm-expressivist account of normativity. In particular, the aim is to see whether Gibbard’s theory is able to account for the normativity of reason-claims. For this purpose, I first describe how I come to targeting Gibbard’s theory by setting out the main tenets of quasi-realism cum expressivism. After this, I provide a detailed interpretation of the relevant parts of Gibbard’s theory. I argue that the best reading of his account is the one that takes normativity to be carried by a controlled, coherent, comprehensive set of norms. Finally, I present ...


Human Development, Human Rights, And The 50th Anniversary Of Populorum Progressio, Ellen Maccarone 2017 Gonzaga University

Human Development, Human Rights, And The 50th Anniversary Of Populorum Progressio, Ellen Maccarone

The Social Practice of Human Rights: Charting the Frontiers of Research and Advocacy

At the 50th anniversary of the encyclical Populorum Progressio, we have a critical opportunity to bring Paul VI’s insights to the social practice of human rights. The development of peoples discussed by the encyclical isolates areas of significant concern to the Church and humanity more broadly. This, however, is not to say that there are not other issues overlooked in Populorum Progressio that also need to be addressed.

In this paper I argue that the understanding of human development found in Populorum Progressio serves as an important yet sometimes overlooked foundation in Catholic social teaching for the advancement ...


Hans Urs Von Balthasar: A Primer, Thomas V. Gourlay 402884 2017 The University of Notre Dame Australia

Hans Urs Von Balthasar: A Primer, Thomas V. Gourlay 402884

Thomas V. Gourlay

No abstract provided.


A Request For Non-Voluntary Euthanasia In Bangladesh: A Moral Assessment, Norman K. Swazo 2017 North South University

A Request For Non-Voluntary Euthanasia In Bangladesh: A Moral Assessment, Norman K. Swazo

Bioethics in Faith and Practice

Government authorities in Bangladesh recently were placed in an awkward and extraordinary position of having to make a presumably difficult decision: how to respond to a man’s request to have his two sons and grandson euthanized. This is an extraordinary request for a developing country’s health service authorities to consider, especially in the context of a Muslim-majority population where any appeal to the legitimacy of suicide (and, by extension, physician-assisted suicide) would be automatically rejected as contrary to Islamic moral and jurisprudential principles. Here the case is reviewed in the context of arguments that engage non-voluntary euthanasia and ...


Lessons From Brave New World, Rachel Moore 2017 Lynchburg College

Lessons From Brave New World, Rachel Moore

Agora

No abstract provided.


Sagp Fordham Program 2017 As Of 0ctober 9, Anthony Preus 2017 Binghamton University

Sagp Fordham Program 2017 As Of 0ctober 9, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Are Second Person Needs ‘Burdened Virtues’?: Exploring The Risks And Rewards Of Caring, Katharine L. Wolfe 2017 St. Lawrence University

Are Second Person Needs ‘Burdened Virtues’?: Exploring The Risks And Rewards Of Caring, Katharine L. Wolfe

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This essay contributes to the ethics of vulnerability and to the tradition of feminist care ethics by introducing the notion of second-person needs. Employing the work of Annette Baier, who argues that we are all ‘second persons’ insofar as personhood arises through a childhood in the care of others, it draws attention to the needs that are illuminated when we approach ourselves and others as second persons, and makes a case for the moral import of second-person needs. In drawing from and critically responding to Lisa Tessman’s concept of ‘burdened virtues,’ it also adds to a growing field of ...


Hermeneutical Injustice And The Problem Of Authority, Komarine Romdenh-Romluc 2017 University of Sheffield

Hermeneutical Injustice And The Problem Of Authority, Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

Miranda Fricker (2008) identifies a wrong she calls ‘hermeneutical injustice’. A culture’s hermeneutical resources are the shared meanings its members use to understand their experience, and communicate this understanding to others. Cultures tend to be composed of different social groups that are organised hierarchically. As a consequence of these uneven power relations, the culture’s shared meanings often reflect the lives of its more powerful members, and fail to properly capture the experiences of the less powerful. This may result in members of less powerful groups being harmed. Such disadvantage constitutes, for Fricker, hermeneutical injustice. In this paper, I ...


Dismantling Purity: Toward A Feminist Curdling Of Hawaiian Identity, L Brooke Rudow-Abouharb 2017 University of Georgia

Dismantling Purity: Toward A Feminist Curdling Of Hawaiian Identity, L Brooke Rudow-Abouharb

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This paper explores Hawaiian racial identity formation using María Lugones’s metaphor of curdling as a guiding theme. I aim to show that the accepted definition of “native Hawaiian” is based on a purity model of race that serves to undermine the unity of the Hawaiian Nation. I begin by outlining the pre-contact understanding of Hawaiian identity. This conception of identity was subsequently altered through various political agendas to fit within a Western/European notion of “pure” racial identity. I argue that continuing to use the imposed definition of “native Hawaiian” makes the fragmentation of Hawaiian identity and society difficult ...


Objectivity, Diversity, And Uptake: On The Status Of Women In Philosophy, Michelle Ciurria 2017 Practical Justice Initiative, the University of New South Wales

Objectivity, Diversity, And Uptake: On The Status Of Women In Philosophy, Michelle Ciurria

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This paper argues that diversity and uptake are required for objectivity. In philosophy, women are underrepresented with respect to teaching, publishing, and citations. This undermines the objectivity of our research output. To improve women’s representation and objectivity in philosophy, we should take steps to increase women’s numbers and institute uptake-conducive conditions. In concrete terms, this means fostering an appreciation for diversity, diversifying evaluators, integrating women’s contributions into mainstream discourse, and reducing implicit bias.


Is God The Necessary Being?, Bryce E. Hardy 2017 Liberty University

Is God The Necessary Being?, Bryce E. Hardy

Quaerens Deum: The Liberty Undergraduate Journal for Philosophy of Religion

This paper briefly presents and engages with four competing hypotheses as to the most plausible explanation for the beginning of the universe. After clarifying some terminology, I will first establish both scientific and philosophical reasons for accepting the notion of an absolute beginning over a past eternal universe. Next, I will interact with Lawrence Krauss’ two versions of “nothing” and speculation of a multiverse as possible suggestions for what that first cause might be. In response, I will demonstrate the logical inadequacy of this approach, and by extension all other non-metaphysical theories. Ultimately, I will determine that, due to the ...


Behind The Veil: Mysticism And The Reply To Hiddenness In The Work Of Travis Dumsday, Catherine McCrary 2017 Liberty University

Behind The Veil: Mysticism And The Reply To Hiddenness In The Work Of Travis Dumsday, Catherine Mccrary

Quaerens Deum: The Liberty Undergraduate Journal for Philosophy of Religion

Ever since J. L. Schellenberg formulated his infamous atheistic argument from hiddenness in his 1993 book Divine Hiddenness and Human Reason, the problem of divine hiddenness--the question of why a good God would hide Himself, even from those actively seeking Him--has troubled theists. Schellenberg's argument from hiddenness has proven notoriously difficult for theists to answer, and perhaps this is why it is now second only to the problem of evil in popularity with atheists. While many theists have tried to find an adequate answer to the problem of hiddenness, and many have made good attempts, no response has been ...


Can God Know What Time It Is? A Working Paper, Caleb Brown 2017 Liberty University

Can God Know What Time It Is? A Working Paper, Caleb Brown

Quaerens Deum: The Liberty Undergraduate Journal for Philosophy of Religion

Many thinkers hold the following five propositions are inconsistent:

  1. The dynamic theory of time (McTaggart’s “A-theory”) is correct
  2. God is atemporal
  3. God knows tensed facts
  4. Free human actions are possible
  5. God interacts responsively with humans

This working paper uses the discussion in Four Views: God and Time as a starting-point and moves towards explaining how these propositions are consistent.


Fortifying The Self-Defense Justification Of Punishment, Zac Cogley 2017 Northern Michigan University

Fortifying The Self-Defense Justification Of Punishment, Zac Cogley

Journal Articles

David Boonin has recently advanced several challenges to the self-defense justification of punishment. Boonin argues that the self-defense justification of punishment justifies punishing the innocent, justifies disproportionate punishment, cannot account for mitigating excuses, and does not justify intentionally harming offenders as we do when we punish them. In this paper, I argue that the self-defense justification, suitably understood, can avoid all of these problems. To help demonstrate the self-defense theory’s attraction, I also develop some contrasts between the self-defense justification, Warren Quinn’s better known ‘auto-retaliator’ argument, and desert-based justifications of punishment. In sum, I show that the self-defense ...


For Philosophers, Art Is Also In The Mind, Aldemaro Romero Jr. 2017 CUNY Bernard M Baruch College

For Philosophers, Art Is Also In The Mind, Aldemaro Romero Jr.

Publications and Research

Many college professors start with a broad range of interests, but often it’s the example of a gifted teacher that shows them the way. That was the case with Dr. Jonathan Gilmore. “I was a pre-med student taking hard science courses, but I had to take a philosophy course as well, and I had an extraordinarily dynamic art history professor. And then I thought, ‘This is what I want to do.’ So I shifted career plans, moved to New York right after college, enrolled at Columbia and did a PhD in Philosophy, but also studied for the PhD in ...


Speaking Of Genocide: Double Binds And Political Discourse, Benjamin Meiches 2017 University of Washington Tacoma

Speaking Of Genocide: Double Binds And Political Discourse, Benjamin Meiches

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

Genocide scholars have always argued over the best definition of genocide. However, recent genocide studies have begun to emphasize both the ‘contestable’ nature of genocide and, paradoxically, call for clear or rigid definitions of the term. This article evaluates this tension by examining the act of defining genocide as a type of epistemological practice. Placing the act of definition in the context of a complex socio-linguistic system, the article shows how genocide discourse is subject to a variety of demands and pressures. These pressures, internal to genocide discourse, inadvertently promote restrictive and paradoxical formulations of the concept. To illustrate this ...


Scorsese’S Silence: Film As Practical Theodicy, ian deweese-boyd 2017 Gordon College - Wenham

Scorsese’S Silence: Film As Practical Theodicy, Ian Deweese-Boyd

Journal of Religion & Film

Martin Scorsese’s adaptation of Shusaku Endo’s novel Silence takes up the anguished experience of God’s silence in the face of human suffering. The main character, the Jesuit priest Sabastião Rodrigues, finds his faith gutted by the appalling silence of God as he witnesses the horrific persecution of Christians in seventeenth century Japan. Yujin Nagasawa calls the particularly intense combination of the problems of divine hiddenness and evil the problem of divine absence that resists resolution through explanations that have typically characterized the theodicies offered by philosophers. Drawing on the thought of Ignatius of Loyola, this essay explores ...


The Little Hours, Frederick Ruf, Kathryn Wade 2017 Georgetown University

The Little Hours, Frederick Ruf, Kathryn Wade

Journal of Religion & Film

This is a film review of The Little Hours (2017), directed by Jeff Baena.


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