Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Philosophy Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

15415 Full-Text Articles 6935 Authors 3200119 Downloads 244 Institutions

All Articles in Philosophy

Faceted Search

15415 full-text articles. Page 1 of 359.

Arguments Against Peter Klein's Infinitism, Jason A Dewitt 2017 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Arguments Against Peter Klein's Infinitism, Jason A Dewitt

University of Tennessee Honors Thesis Projects

No abstract provided.


Mereological Idealism, Kenneth Pearce 2016 Valparaiso University

Mereological Idealism, Kenneth Pearce

Kenneth L Pearce

No abstract provided.


Comments On Joseph Chan, Confucian Perfectionism, Stephen C. Angle 2016 Wesleyan University

Comments On Joseph Chan, Confucian Perfectionism, Stephen C. Angle

Stephen C. Angle

I approach this encounter with Joseph Chan’s important work on Confucian perfectionism from a fundamentally sympathetic standpoint. Most basically, I agree with two of his key premises. Confucianism is more than a rich historical tradition: it is a live strand of political (and other types of) theory, able to criticize and contribute to our lives today. But for modern Confucianism to be plausible and attractive, it must find a way to embrace the idea of limited government or constitutionalism in a deeper fashion than it did historically. There are many other issues that Joseph covers in his book, and ...


Buddhism And Zhu Xi’S Epistemology, Stephen C. Angle 2016 Wesleyan University

Buddhism And Zhu Xi’S Epistemology, Stephen C. Angle

Stephen C. Angle

There are at least superficial reasons for thinking that Zhu Xi’s epistemology is significantly influenced by Chinese Buddhism. For one thing, in his youth Zhu studied with Kaishan Daoqian 開善道謙 (d. 1150?), a leading disciple of the most influential Chan teacher of the era, Dahui Zonggao大慧宗杲 (1089-1163). For another, his discussions of epistemology lean heavily on terms like “genuine knowing 真知” that also figure significantly in Buddhist discussions. As is well known, subsequent critics of the Daoxue movement with which Zhu was centrally associated regularly accused it of being strongly colored by Buddhism. Finally, modern scholars have also ...


Implicit Bias, Resp, Moral Ecology.Pdf, Manuel R. Vargas 2016 University of San Francisco

Implicit Bias, Resp, Moral Ecology.Pdf, Manuel R. Vargas

Manuel Vargas

Roughly, implicit bias is a partially unconscious and partially automatic (frequently negative) evaluative tendency directed at individuals, based on their apparent membership in a socially salient category or group. It is unclear what we should think about an agent’s blameworthiness for actions produced in part by implicit biases, and there are reasons that weigh both in favor and against holding that such agents are blameworthy. There is also a more radical possibility lurking: implicit bias may reveal the limitations of a widespread conception of agency. That is, perhaps implicit bias (maybe along with various other results from the cognitive ...


The Search For Certainty: A Pragmatist Critique Of Society’S Focus On Biological Childbearing, Jamie P. Ross 2016 Portland State University

The Search For Certainty: A Pragmatist Critique Of Society’S Focus On Biological Childbearing, Jamie P. Ross

Jamie P Ross

The Search for Certainty: A Pragmatist Critique of Society’s Focus on Biological Childbearing Abstract I suggest that a form of biological determinism rests on what philosopher John Dewey calls a misplaced “search for certainty.” This search is a process whereby a constructed desire is normalized within a cultural context and naturalized in the body in a manner that substantiates the desire as predictable. Predictability, therefore, justifies a biological basis of desire. In this paper I focus specifically on a desire to bear or produce a biological child: a desire that becomes predictable within a medical model of emotion based ...


Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant McCall 2016 Tulane University of Louisiana

Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant Mccall

Karl Widerquist


Why do political philosophers write so much about prehistory but do such little research on it? The state of nature, the origin of property, the genesis of government, and the primordial nature of war and inequality are perennial favourite topics in political philosophy, but their use is often ambiguous. Are these merely illustrative examples? If so, what do they illustrate? If not, what claims to they make about prehistory. Does the best available evidence from the fields of archaeology and anthropology support or conflict with those claims?
 
This book presents an anthropological critique of philosophy, examining political theories to show ...


Appendix To Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant McCall 2016 Tulane University of Louisiana

Appendix To Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant Mccall

Karl Widerquist


This is an early version of the appendix to the book: Prehistoric Myths in Modern Political Philosophy.
 
Book abstract: Why do political philosophers write so much about prehistory but do such little research on it? The state of nature, the origin of property, the genesis of government, and the primordial nature of war and inequality are perennial favourite topics in political philosophy, but their use is often ambiguous. Are these merely illustrative examples? If so, what do they illustrate? If not, what claims to they make about prehistory. Does the best available evidence from the fields of archaeology and anthropology ...


Logical Form And The Vernacular Revisited, Andrew Botterell, Robert J. Stainton 2016 The Univeristy of Western Ontario

Logical Form And The Vernacular Revisited, Andrew Botterell, Robert J. Stainton

Robert J. Stainton

We revisit a debate initiated some fifteen years ago by Ray Elugardo and Robert Stainton about the domain of arguments. Our main result is that arguments are not exclusively sets of linguistic expressions. Instead, as we put it, some non-linguistic items have ‘logical form’. The crucial examples are arguments, both deductive and inductive, made with unembedded words and phrases.


Logical Form And The Vernacular Revisited, Andrew Botterell, Robert J. Stainton 2016 The Univeristy of Western Ontario

Logical Form And The Vernacular Revisited, Andrew Botterell, Robert J. Stainton

Robert J. Stainton

We revisit a debate initiated some fifteen years ago by Ray Elugardo and Robert Stainton about the domain of arguments. Our main result is that arguments are not exclusively sets of linguistic expressions. Instead, as we put it, some non-linguistic items have ‘logical form’. The crucial examples are arguments, both deductive and inductive, made with unembedded words and phrases.


Three Essays In Intuitionistic Epistemology, Tudor Protopopescu 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Three Essays In Intuitionistic Epistemology, Tudor Protopopescu

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

We present three papers studying knowledge and its logic from an intuitionistic viewpoint.

An Arithmetic Interpretation of Intuitionistic Verification

Intuitionistic epistemic logic introduces an epistemic operator to intuitionistic logic which reflects the intended BHK semantics of intuitionism. The fundamental assumption concerning intuitionistic knowledge and belief is that it is the product of verification. The BHK interpretation of intuitionistic logic has a precise formulation in the Logic of Proofs and its arithmetical semantics. We show here that this interpretation can be extended to the notion of verification upon which intuitionistic knowledge is based. This provides the systems of intuitionistic epistemic logic ...


Seeing And Perceptual Content, Ben S. Phillips 2016 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Seeing And Perceptual Content, Ben S. Phillips

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

There are two widely held assumptions about perception: ascriber-independence (the view that the facts regarding what a subject perceives, as well as what her perceptual states represent, are independent of the interests of those attributing the relevant states to her), and determinacy (the view that perceptual content is relatively determinate). I challenge both of these assumptions, and develop a new approach to perceptual content, with implications for theories of mental content more broadly. In chapter one, I address the question of whether, in addition to low-level features, vision represents ordinary objects. I argue that there is just no fact of ...


Ecopsychology Revisited: For Whom Do The “Nature” Bells Toll? (In Progress), Jorge Conesa-Sevilla 2016 European Ecopsychology Society

Ecopsychology Revisited: For Whom Do The “Nature” Bells Toll? (In Progress), Jorge Conesa-Sevilla

Jorge Conesa-Sevilla PhD

"[...] A recurring theme in “ecopsychology,” in its present and inchoate form, is the continuation and extension of “spirit” in juxtaposition with other privileged and/or habitually preferred (perhaps even psychologically needed) practices or causes (spirituality-somethings, farcical chemistry or physics, yoga, coopted and partially understood indigenous lore, extreme diets, and various fetishes). That these mostly emotion-laden, unreasoned, and/or idiosyncratic amalgamations are prevalent says more about the psychological needs of the persons espousing these sentiments or beliefs (their hobbies or interests) than about “nature.” Certainly, it is nothing new that humans project their hopes, desperations, and wish-fulfillment thinking onto the shifting ...


Full-On Stating, Robert J. Stainton 2016 University of Western Ontario

Full-On Stating, Robert J. Stainton

Robert J. Stainton

What distinguishes full-on stating a proposition from merely communicating it? For instance, what distinguishes claiming/asserting/saying that one has never smoked crack cocaine from merely implying/conveying/hinting this? The enormous literature on ‘assertion’ provides many approaches to distinguishing stating from, say, asking and commanding: only the former aims at truth; only the former expresses one’s belief; etc. But this leaves my question unanswered, since in merely communicating a proposition one also aims at truth, expresses a belief, etc.
My aim is not to criticize extant accounts of the state-vs.-merely-convey contrast, but rather to draw on clues ...


Imagine No Religion: How Modern Abstractions Hide Ancient Realities [Table Of Contents], Carlin A. Barton, Daniel Boyarin 2016 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Imagine No Religion: How Modern Abstractions Hide Ancient Realities [Table Of Contents], Carlin A. Barton, Daniel Boyarin

Religion

“A timely contribution to a growing and important conversation about the inadequacy of our common category ‘religion’ for the understanding of many practices, attitudes, emotions, and beliefs—especially of peoples in other times and contexts—that we usually classify as ‘religion.’” —Wayne A. Meeks, Yale University


Justice; Mater Et Magistra; Civil Rights; Zoning; Sociological Jurisprudence; Mr. Justice Brennan; Business Ethics, 2016 St. John's University School of Law

Justice; Mater Et Magistra; Civil Rights; Zoning; Sociological Jurisprudence; Mr. Justice Brennan; Business Ethics

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Attorneys In Doubt, James E. Starrs 2016 St. John's University School of Law

Attorneys In Doubt, James E. Starrs

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


The State's Guarantee Of Liberty - A Moral Evaluation, Rev. William F. Cahill 2016 St. John's University School of Law

The State's Guarantee Of Liberty - A Moral Evaluation, Rev. William F. Cahill

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Jurisprudence Between Science And The Humanities, Dan Priel 2016 York University

Jurisprudence Between Science And The Humanities, Dan Priel

Dan Priel

For a long time philosophy has been unique among the humanities for seeking closer alliance with the sciences. In this Article I examine the place of science in relation to legal positivism. I argue that, historically, legal positivism has been advanced by theorists who were also positivists in the sense the term is used in the philosophy of social science: they were committed to the idea that the explanation of social phenomena should be conducted using similar methods to those used in the natural sciences. I then argue that since around 1960 jurisprudence, and legal positivism in particular, has undergone ...


Toward A Rigourous Definition Of Vagueness In Semantics, Philippe Gauthier 2016 Western University

Toward A Rigourous Definition Of Vagueness In Semantics, Philippe Gauthier

Western Papers in Linguistics / Cahiers linguistiques de Western

This paper deals with vague predicates. In particular, the goal is to arrive at a precise characterisation of a vague predicate without begging the question against a particular theoretical account on the matter. For instance, such a characterisation should not exclude by fiat a theory that exploits the notion of gappy or glutty truth values. Furthermore, it should be neutral with respect to locating vagueness in epistemology or language. Following Bueno and Colyvan (2012), I argue in favour of characterising vagueness purely in terms of sorites susceptibility. However, I caution that the sorites argument can also be used to diagnose ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress