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From Raiders To Traders: The Viking-Arab Trade Exchange, Susanne Watts 2015 American Public University System

From Raiders To Traders: The Viking-Arab Trade Exchange, Susanne Watts

Saber and Scroll

The Viking raids across Europe brought them into contact with other cultures, including Muslim Arabs. Although there are no known Viking settlements in the Arab lands, both cultures interacted with each other through their respective exploration of Europe. Contact between Vikings and Arabs occurred mainly in the area of what would become Russia. While there is scarce evidence that Arabs visited the homelands of the Vikings, or as they called them, the “people of the North,” artifacts found across Scandinavia, and especially in Sweden, point to an extensive long-distance trade exchange between the two very different cultures. It was the ...


Einhard: The Lasting Influence Of The Life Of Charlemagne And Other Works, Aida Dias 2015 American Public University System

Einhard: The Lasting Influence Of The Life Of Charlemagne And Other Works, Aida Dias

Saber and Scroll

The Carolingian period was of significant importance to the development of medieval history writing. Charlemagne (c.742-814) surrounded himself with scholars in an effort to promote learning and the arts, which had been in decline for centuries. Within this Carolingian Renaissance, there was one scholar who established his place in history by writing a concise but remarkable, and mostly accurate, biography of the greatest king and emperor of the early Middle Ages. This scholar was Einhard (c.770-840), who created impressively original works that had both an immediate and lasting influence on the writing of biographies and hagiographies. A closer ...


Kashmiri Marsiya (Elegy) Manuscripts: The Valuable Sources For The Dissemination, Reconstruction And Safeguarding The History And Culture-Iii, tawfeeq nazir 2015 University of Kashmir

Kashmiri Marsiya (Elegy) Manuscripts: The Valuable Sources For The Dissemination, Reconstruction And Safeguarding The History And Culture-Iii, Tawfeeq Nazir

Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal)

Manuscripts are the links to the historical facts that will otherwise remain unknown to the world. They contain authentic information and facts about the social, political and cultural aspects of a nation. Therefore their intellectual value cannot be over emphasized. Many countries and nations are joining hands towards preserving such cultural assets by way of taking conservation and preservation measures including digitization and documentation.

Marsiya or Elegy has gained more importance after the Martyrdom of Imam Hussain (a.s) and his companions and household in Karbala. Marsiya has been since written and recited in order to mourning the tragic events ...


“I Shall Read That You Are My Husband And You Shall See Me Sign Myself Your Wife”: Analyzing The Rhetorical Strategies Of Heloise D’Argenteuil, Sara M. Wiltgen 2015 Middle Georgia State University

“I Shall Read That You Are My Husband And You Shall See Me Sign Myself Your Wife”: Analyzing The Rhetorical Strategies Of Heloise D’Argenteuil, Sara M. Wiltgen

Papers and Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

This project strives to decouple the 12th century writer Heloise d’Argenteuil from her husband, the notorious Peter Abelard, establishing her as a significant thinker and writer, particularly in the tradition of women’s literature. Heloise, in fact, anticipated the querelle des femme of a later medieval scholar, Christine de Pizan, as she sought to combat stereotypical thinking about women within the circumscribed role of a devoted lover and wife to Abelard. Drawing on the work of Sally Livingston and others, I will examine various medieval discourses.

In her letters, Heloise is revealed as a figure aspiring to be ...


Global Chaucers: Reflections On Collaboration And Digital Futures, Candace Barrington, Jonathan Hsy 2015 Central Connecticut State University

Global Chaucers: Reflections On Collaboration And Digital Futures, Candace Barrington, Jonathan Hsy

Accessus

Global Chaucers, our multi-national, multi-lingual, multi-year project, intends to locate, catalog, translate, archive, and analyze non-Anglophone appropriations and translations of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. Since its founding in 2012, this project has rapidly changed in response to scholars’ diverse interests and our expanding discoveries. Almost all these changes were prompted and made possible by our online presence (including a blog and Facebook group), and digital media comprises our primary means for gathering information, disseminating our findings, advertising conferences and events, and promoting the resource to other scholars. Because digital media can help disparate people traverse geographical and linguistic barriers ...


“Nede Hath No Law”: The State Of Exception In Gower And Langland, Conrad J. van Dijk 2015 Concordia University of Edmonton

“Nede Hath No Law”: The State Of Exception In Gower And Langland, Conrad J. Van Dijk

Accessus

This article discusses the use of the legal maxim necessity knows no law in the works of William Langland and John Gower. Whereas Langland’s usage has stirred up great controversy, Gower’s unique application of the canon law adage has received hardly any attention. On the surface, it is difficult to think of two authors less alike, and the way in which they relate the concept of necessity to different subjects (the poverty debate, fin amour) seems to support that feeling. Yet this article argues that reading Langland and Gower side by side is mutually illuminating. Specifically, this article ...


Foreword, Georgiana Donavin, Eve Salisbury 2015 Westminster College

Foreword, Georgiana Donavin, Eve Salisbury

Accessus

Co-editors Georgiana Donavin and Eve Salisbury welcome readers to Accessus 2.2.


Beowulf (2014), Translated By J.R.R. Tolkien, Edited By Christopher Tolkien, E.L. Risden 2015 Valparaiso University

Beowulf (2014), Translated By J.R.R. Tolkien, Edited By Christopher Tolkien, E.L. Risden

Journal of Tolkien Research

Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary, together with Sellic Spell (2014), by J.R.R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Tolkien. Book review by E.L. Risden.


In Awe Of The Past, Charles Lein 2015 Western Michigan University

In Awe Of The Past, Charles Lein

The Hilltop Review

No abstract provided.


Late Medieval Mediterranean Apocalypticism: Joachimist Ideas In Ramon Llull’S Crusade Treatises, Michael Sanders 2015 Western Michigan University

Late Medieval Mediterranean Apocalypticism: Joachimist Ideas In Ramon Llull’S Crusade Treatises, Michael Sanders

The Hilltop Review

The thirteenth century witnessed dramatic changes that transformed the medieval world and remain important today. The violent changes caused by the War of the Sicilian Vespers and Spiritual Franciscan movement popularized the apocalyptic ideas of the twelfth-century Italian abbot, Joachim of Fiore. The abbot's historical paradigms of biblical history influenced many southern Europeans, including the medieval mystic, missionary, and philosopher Ramon Llull (c. 1232-1316). Llull dedicated his life to converting the world to Catholic Christianity using a variety of means, including evangelical missions, Neoplatonic philosophy, and crusades. Llull's crusade treatises, the Tractatus de modo convertendi infideles (1292), Liber ...


There And Back Again: The Epic Hero's Journey Through Gift-Giving, Emily J. Tomusko 2015 Cleveland State University

There And Back Again: The Epic Hero's Journey Through Gift-Giving, Emily J. Tomusko

The Downtown Review

Both The Hobbit and Beowulf have a place in the hearts of many readers across the world. In this article, we will discuss the concept of Anglo-Saxon gift-giving and the importance it played in the culture. This cultural norm was present in multiple forms of medieval literature, particularly in the epic poem mentioned above, Beowulf. I believe that this precedent of gift-giving was transmitted to the citizens of the culture as a form of “medieval propaganda” that encouraged the people to abide by said cultural norm, and expressed the punishment of failing to follow through. Furthermore, I believe that the ...


Magic And Femininity As Power In Medieval Literature, Anna McGill 2015 East Tennessee State University

Magic And Femininity As Power In Medieval Literature, Anna Mcgill

Undergraduate Honors Theses

It is undeniable that literature reflects much about the society that produces it. The give-and-take relationship between a society and its literature is especially interesting when medieval texts are considered. Because most medieval plots and characters are variants of existing stories, the ways that the portrayals change has the potential to reveal much about the differences between medieval societies separated by distance and time. Changes to the treatment of these recurring characters and their stories can reveal how the attitudes of medieval society changed over time. Perceptions of magic and attitudes toward its female practitioners, both real and fictional, changed ...


The Pendragon Cycle: Celtic Christianity In The Arthurian Legend Through Bards, Prophets, And Historians, Rebecca L. Heine 2015 Student

The Pendragon Cycle: Celtic Christianity In The Arthurian Legend Through Bards, Prophets, And Historians, Rebecca L. Heine

Honors Theses

This thesis centers on The Pendragon Cycle as a late-twentieth century retelling of the Arthurian legend by the American author Stephen Lawhead. Through The Pendragon Cycle, Lawhead emphasizes the historical foundation of Arthuriana in the setting of fifth-century Britain while simultaneously incorporating mythology from the Atlanteans, to the Celtic Otherworld, to the Holy Grail. Lawhead draws inspiration from medieval Welsh and Christian characterizations of the legend such as medieval historical chronicles like The History of the Kings of Britain by Geoffrey of Monmouth; following in the footsteps of medieval historians, Lawhead uses the medium of the Arthurian legend to present ...


50th International Congress On Medieval Studies, Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University 2015 Western Michigan University

50th International Congress On Medieval Studies, Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University

International Congress on Medieval Studies Archive

The printed program of the 50th International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 14-17, 2015), including the Corrigenda.


"So Vexed Me The Þouȝtful Maladie": Public Presentation Of The Private Self In Hoccleve's My Compleinte And The Conpleynte Paramont, Lauren M. Silverio 2015 University of Connecticut - Storrs

"So Vexed Me The Þouȝtful Maladie": Public Presentation Of The Private Self In Hoccleve's My Compleinte And The Conpleynte Paramont, Lauren M. Silverio

Honors Scholar Theses

The scholarship surrounding the life and work of Thomas Hoccleve is relatively young and lean compared to the tomes of knowledge that have been circulated about the slightly older and vastly more popular Geoffrey Chaucer. Up until the second half of the 20th century, Hoccleve came through history with the unfortunate moniker of the "lesser Chaucer." What this insult neglects, however, is that Hoccleve was more than just a lowly clerk who spent his days admiring and emulating the so-called Father of English Literature. Thomas Hoccleve deserves recognition for conceiving and creating works that are impressive both in their form ...


The Roles And Behaviors Of A Medieval Housewife As Portrayed In Late Fourteenth Century Verse And Prose In Relation To Historical Record, Bradley Peppers 2015 Georgia State University

The Roles And Behaviors Of A Medieval Housewife As Portrayed In Late Fourteenth Century Verse And Prose In Relation To Historical Record, Bradley Peppers

Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Julian Of Norwich: Voicing The Vernacular, Therese Elaine Novotny 2015 Marquette University

Julian Of Norwich: Voicing The Vernacular, Therese Elaine Novotny

Dissertations (2009 -)

Julian of Norwich (1342-1416), the subject of my dissertation, was a Christian mystic whose writings, Revelation of Love and A Book of Showings, are the earliest surviving texts in the English language written by a woman. The question that has puzzled scholars is how could a woman of her time express her vision in such innovative and literary language? The reason scholars have puzzled over this for centuries is that women had been denied access to traditional education. Some scholars have answered this problem through close textual comparisons linking her text to those in the patristic tradition or through modern ...


Crossing Cultures: The Old Norse Adaptations Of Marie De France’S Lais, Kenna Jacobs 2015 University of Connecticut - Storrs

Crossing Cultures: The Old Norse Adaptations Of Marie De France’S Lais, Kenna Jacobs

The Quiet Corner Interdisciplinary Journal

The representation of sin and sexuality in Marie de France’s Lais is a topic that continues to be debated among scholars, as the unexpected storylines – including adultery, bestiality, and physical violence – often clash with our preconceived notions concerning the medieval principles of modesty and restraint. The provoking, even disconcerting, nature of this work becomes quite apparent when examined in conjunction with their later adaptations in the thirteenth century, as King Hákon of Norway commissioned the translation of several lais into Old Norse as a means of promoting the courtly codes and conventions within French literature. Focusing on the lais ...


The Knights Of The Front: Medieval History’S Influence On Great War Propaganda, Haley E. Claxton 2015 Kansas State University

The Knights Of The Front: Medieval History’S Influence On Great War Propaganda, Haley E. Claxton

Crossing Borders: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Scholarship

Spanning a number of academic areas, “Knights of the Front: Medieval History’s Influence on Great War Propaganda” focuses on the emergence of medieval imagery in the First World War propaganda. Examining several specific uses of medieval symbolism in propaganda posters from both Central and Allied powers, the article provides insight into the narrative of war, both politically and culturally constructed. The paper begins with an overview of the psychology behind visual persuasion and the history behind Europe’s cultural affinity for “chivalry,” then continues into specific case studies of period propaganda posters that hold not only themes of military ...


“For It Acordeth Noght To Kinde”: Remediating Gower’S Confessio Amantis In Machinima, Sarah L. Higley 2015 University of Rochester, NY

“For It Acordeth Noght To Kinde”: Remediating Gower’S Confessio Amantis In Machinima, Sarah L. Higley

Accessus

Visual adaptation of a medieval text, as tempting as it is in film of any kind, is never an easy conversion, and all the more so if the original is as formally structured as John Gower’s Confessio Amantis. This essay examines the philosophy and difficulties of making a “medieval motion picture” (animated and narrated by the author) reflect the message of three of Gower’s tales (“The Travelers and the Angel,” “Canace and Machaire,” “Florent”) as well as the multimedia properties of the manuscripts that house them, their illuminations beckoning us into colorful virtual worlds. In referencing theories of ...


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