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With One's Own Arms: Condottieri, Machiavelli, And The Rise Of The Florentine Militia, Michael N. Boncardo '18 2014 Gettysburg College

With One's Own Arms: Condottieri, Machiavelli, And The Rise Of The Florentine Militia, Michael N. Boncardo '18

Student Publications

This paper examines the use of mercenary warfare on the Italian peninsula during the late 15th and early 16th centuries. It later focuses on the unique political and economic environment in Florence that led to Niccolo Machiavelli orchestrating the creation of the Florentine militia.


The [Ftaires!] To Remembrance: Language, Memory, And Visual Rhetoric In Chaucer's House Of Fame And Danielewski's House Of Leaves, Shannon Danae Kilgore 2014 University of Puget Sound

The [Ftaires!] To Remembrance: Language, Memory, And Visual Rhetoric In Chaucer's House Of Fame And Danielewski's House Of Leaves, Shannon Danae Kilgore

Honors Program Theses

Geoffrey Chaucer's dream poem The House of Fame explores virtual technologies of memory and reading, which are similar to the themes explored in Danielewski's House of Leaves. "[ftaires!]", apart from referencing the anecdotal (and humorous) misspelling of "stairs" in House of Leaves, is one such linguistically and visually informed phenomenon that speaks directly to how we think about, and give remembrance to, our own digital and textual culture. This paper posits that graphic design, illustrations, and other textual cues (such as the [ftaires!] mispelling in House of Leaves] have a subtle yet powerful psychological influence on our reading ...


The Auchinleck Manuscript: A Study In Manuscript Production, Scribal Innovation, And Literary Value In The Early 14th Century, Tricia Kelly George 2014 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

The Auchinleck Manuscript: A Study In Manuscript Production, Scribal Innovation, And Literary Value In The Early 14th Century, Tricia Kelly George

Doctoral Dissertations

The Auchinleck Manuscript (National Library of Scotland Advocates 19.2.1) was written in London by six scribes and contains 44 extant texts. This manuscript is an early 14th century English manuscript (c. 1331) best known for its many unique and first versions of texts, such as the first version of the Breton lay Sir Orfeo, a Breton adaptation of the Orpheus legend. It is also the first literary manuscript we have that is written almost entirely in English after the Norman Conquest. My research provides answers to some of the perennial questions raised by scholars concerning this manuscript ...


How The Axe Falls: A Retrospective On Thirty-Five Years Of Sir Gawain And The Green Knight Performance, Linda Marie Zaerr 2014 Western Michigan University

How The Axe Falls: A Retrospective On Thirty-Five Years Of Sir Gawain And The Green Knight Performance, Linda Marie Zaerr

Accessus

This retrospective represents a new approach to using historical performance as a tool for understanding medieval narrative performance. The core of the article traces how an individual performer’s interaction with a stable medieval text both indicates directions medieval performers may have taken and suggests the limitations imposed by modern performance conventions. The discussion touches on issues of adaptation and translation, variation in troupe composition and audience, expectations of modern audiences, impact of costume choices, and limitations of audio and video recordings as documentation of live performance. Juxtaposing eight performances of a single passage clarifies how performance can transform a ...


Semper Venalis: Gower's Avaricious Lawyers, Robert Meindl 2014 Western Michigan University

Semper Venalis: Gower's Avaricious Lawyers, Robert Meindl

Accessus

The first three chapters of the sixth book of the Vox Clamantis (lines 1-248) comprise a harsh critique of the many avaricious lawyers who, in Gower’s opinion, have come to dominate their profession to the disadvantage of English society in the late fourteenth century. Driven exclusively by their appetite for possessions, they have forgotten the biblical model presented in Psalm 14 that specifies the obligation of the good man to assist without recompense his neighbor’s search for justice. Falsely claiming to be men of law and inheritors of the biblical model of the good man, the causidici (as ...


Preface, Georgiana Donavin, Eve Salisbury 2014 Western Michigan University

Preface, Georgiana Donavin, Eve Salisbury

Accessus

Co-editors Georgiana Donavin and Eve Salisbury thank the readers of Accessus for an enthusiastic reception of the first issue and summarize the contents of this second issue. The second issue showcases opportunities inherent in online publishing, such as the ability to produce extended commentaries and offer video streams. Robert J. Meindl's "Semper Venalis: Gower's Avaricious Lawyers" and Linda Marie Zaerr's "How the Axe Falls: A Retrospective on Thirty-five Years of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Performance," respectively, realize these possibilities in online publishing while adding substantially and insightfully to our knowledge of important fourteenth-century poems from ...


49th International Congress On Medieval Studies, Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University 2014 Western Michigan University

49th International Congress On Medieval Studies, Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University

International Congress on Medieval Studies Archive

The printed program of the 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 8-11, 2014), including the Corrigenda.


Authority And Orthodoxy: The Establishment Of Catholic Temporal Power, Jessie Cortesi 2014 Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne

Authority And Orthodoxy: The Establishment Of Catholic Temporal Power, Jessie Cortesi

IPFW Department of History Undergraduate Conference

Jessie Cortesi is a senior at IPFW. She is a History major and a Medieval Studies minor. She is currently working as the Assistant Book Review Editor for the journal of the Business History Conference, Enterprise and Society, an Oxford University Press quarterly. Together with Dr. Richard Weiner she is co-authoring an article on Andre Gunder Frank for publication in OUP’s forthcoming Encyclopedia of World Poverty. In addition, she was selected as one of this year’s Outstanding History Seniors.


John Wyclif: Papal Reformer, Joshua Fisher 2014 Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne

John Wyclif: Papal Reformer, Joshua Fisher

IPFW Department of History Undergraduate Conference

Joshua Fisher is a senior and will be graduating in May with distinction with a B.A. in History. He is especially interested in the periods of Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, specifically the development of religion and the resulting debates, and how these phenomena impacted both the secular and spiritual realms. He has been accepted for graduate study at Western Michigan University and the University of Tennessee, although he has yet to make a final decision on his immediate future. His career goal is to become an educator and researcher at the collegiate level. Joshua is a member ...


Spain’S Complex Image: The Connections Between The Black Legend And The Spanish Inquisition, Rebecca Jacobs 2014 Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne

Spain’S Complex Image: The Connections Between The Black Legend And The Spanish Inquisition, Rebecca Jacobs

IPFW Department of History Undergraduate Conference

Rebecca Jacobs is a senior at IPFW. She is a History and Anthropology major with certificates in International Studies and Native American studies. She is a recipient of the Chancellor’s and Withers scholarships. She ran for IPFW women’s cross-country and track and field teams for three years. She is the president of IPFW’s Anthropology honors society, Lambda Alpha Theta. Rebecca’s special academic interests include ethnohistory and the study of indigenous cultures, particularly those in South America.


Storytelling In Bronze: The Doors Of The Baptistery Of San Giovanni As Emblems Of Florence's Roman History And Artistic Progression, Erin M. Gregory 2014 College of William and Mary

Storytelling In Bronze: The Doors Of The Baptistery Of San Giovanni As Emblems Of Florence's Roman History And Artistic Progression, Erin M. Gregory

Honors Theses

The three bronze doors of the Baptistery of San Giovanni stand as public expressions of Florence’s imperial history, economic stability, and artistic advances. These commissions can only be understood in their physical context within the Baptistery, the city’s most revered monument. The Baptistery testifies to Florence’s imperial Roman and early Christian history, and it serves vital religious and civic functions within the commune. Each bronze door guards the liminal space between the city’s public sphere and the sacred interior where the baptismal ritual is performed. The bronze medium and the narrative style of the doors further ...


Romance And Reason: Contextualizing The Arthurian Romances Of Chrétien De Troyes, Alexandra Borkowski 2014 University of Massachusetts Boston

Romance And Reason: Contextualizing The Arthurian Romances Of Chrétien De Troyes, Alexandra Borkowski

Graduate History Conference, UMass Boston

The twelfth century saw the birth of the romance in literature, as well as the intellectual and social developments of humanism. The romance often involved the adventures of the knight, focusing on the behavior of the knight using the ideals of courtly love and chivalry. Chrétien de Troyes (c.1135-c.1183) contributed to the discussion of chivalry and courtliness by writing narrative poetry involving the Arthurian legends. He focused on the consequences of his knightly characters’ choices in order to show examples of how a proper knight should behave. This emphasis on the choices of each knight conveys a humanistic ...


How Long Does The Pilgrimage Tourism Experience To Santiago De Compostela Last?, Lucrezia Lopez 2014 Dublin Institute of Technology

How Long Does The Pilgrimage Tourism Experience To Santiago De Compostela Last?, Lucrezia Lopez

International Journal of Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage

Tourism and pilgrimage are different social phenomena (Cohen, 1992; Collins-Kreiner, 2010a); tourism is more secular than pilgrimage, which is mainly a sacred journey (Barber, 2001). In spite of this, both indicate a ‘movement’; so that tourists and pilgrims are ‘foreigners, travellers and strangers’ (Smith, 1992) who look for authentic experiences (Collins-Kreiner, 2010a). The question: ‘What kind of Experience Pilgrimage is?’ has many answers. From a social point of view, pilgrims are free from social obligations; they share the same destination and the same social status. Because of this, the anthropologists Turner and Turner (1978) defined pilgrimage as an anti-structural experience ...


Aaron Swartz’S Legacy, Rebecca Gould 2014 SelectedWorks

Aaron Swartz’S Legacy, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

“Aaron Swartz’s Legacy,” Academe: Magazine of the American Association of University Professors 95(1): 19-23. Special issue on the “New Public Intellectual.” http://www.aaup.org/article/aaron-swartz%E2%80%99s-legacy#.UtZGm2RDtmk


Jews, Pagans, And Heretics In Early Medieval Canon Law, David M. Freidenreich 2014 Colby College

Jews, Pagans, And Heretics In Early Medieval Canon Law, David M. Freidenreich

David M. Freidenreich

No abstract provided.


Stratalinguistics And Shifts In Power: Changing Perceptions Of Ethnicity In Post-Roman Britain, Graham David Sean O'Toole 2014 University of Colorado, Boulder

Stratalinguistics And Shifts In Power: Changing Perceptions Of Ethnicity In Post-Roman Britain, Graham David Sean O'Toole

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Recent trends in the study of Roman Britain have been exposed to the new study of “stratalinguistics” as a means of tracking and explaining certain linguistic phenomena. Peter Schrijver began this process by suggesting that a heavy Latinization of the lowland zone caused deep phonological changes to Brittonic both in the Roman and the post-Roman period. Schrijver’s stratalinguistics suggest a Latin superstrate in the Roman period and a Latin substrate in the post-Roman period. I will take this conclusion, along with archaeological and literary evidence, and suggest a strong change in the perceptions of power in with the departure ...


Tmg 1 (2014): Pandemic Disease In The Medieval World: Rethinking The Black Death, Ed. Monica Green, Monica H. Green, Carol Symes, Anna Colet, Josep Xavier Muntané i Santiveri, Jordi Ruíz, Oriol Saula, M. Eulàlia Subirà de Galdàcano, Clara Jáuregui, Sharon N. DeWitte, Stuart Borsch, Ann G. Carmichael, Nükhet Varlık, Fabian Crespo, Matt B. Lawrenz, Michelle Ziegler, Robert Hymes, Kathleen Walker-Meikle, Wolfgang P. Müller 2014 Western Michigan University

Tmg 1 (2014): Pandemic Disease In The Medieval World: Rethinking The Black Death, Ed. Monica Green, Monica H. Green, Carol Symes, Anna Colet, Josep Xavier Muntané I Santiveri, Jordi Ruíz, Oriol Saula, M. Eulàlia Subirà De Galdàcano, Clara Jáuregui, Sharon N. Dewitte, Stuart Borsch, Ann G. Carmichael, Nükhet Varlık, Fabian Crespo, Matt B. Lawrenz, Michelle Ziegler, Robert Hymes, Kathleen Walker-Meikle, Wolfgang P. Müller

The Medieval Globe

The plague organism (Yersinia pestis) killed an estimated 40% to 60% of all people when it spread rapidly through the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe in the fourteenth century: an event known as the Black Death. Previous research has shown, especially for Western Europe, how population losses then led to structural economic, political, and social changes. But why and how did the pandemic happen in the first place? When and where did it begin? How was it sustained? What was its full geographic extent? And when did it really end?

Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World is the first ...


The Burgos Tapestry: Medieval Theatre And Visual Experience, Nathalie Rochel FRCH '11 2013 Fordham University

The Burgos Tapestry: Medieval Theatre And Visual Experience, Nathalie Rochel Frch '11

Fordham Undergraduate Research Journal

In the field of art history, the medium of tapestry has only recently begun to gain attention as its own significant art form. This paper examines the possible relationship between the Burgos Tapestry, recently on view at The Cloisters after a thirty-year conservation, and medieval theatre. The compositional and stylistic forms of the tapestry may have been influenced by productions of medieval mystery plays, which through analysis can help provide a greater understanding of the medieval cultural mindset, the possible artistic decisions behind maintaining medieval pictorial traditions into the early sixteenth century, and the medieval viewer’s experience when looking ...


Civility And Gower's "Visio Anglie", Lynn Arner 2013 Western Michigan University

Civility And Gower's "Visio Anglie", Lynn Arner

Accessus

Deploying conventions from medieval courtesy manuals, Gower’s Visio Anglie assigned varied degrees of authority to Englishmen and women at the bodily level, a system of signification in which food, physical appearances, and overall comportment were key elements. Echoing courtesy manuals, the Visio constructed corporal marks of distinction, interpreted physical signifiers as indices of people’s inner character and value, and classified bodies into social groups accordingly. Offering understandings of civility that began with codes of bodily conduct and that expanded to claims about the cosmos, the Visio’s corporal regulatory system promoted particular understandings of citizenship and governance that ...


The Trentham Manuscript As Broken Prosthesis: Wholeness And Disability In Lancastrian England, Candace Barrington 2013 Western Michigan University

The Trentham Manuscript As Broken Prosthesis: Wholeness And Disability In Lancastrian England, Candace Barrington

Accessus

Gower’s Trentham manuscript allows us to think about pre-modern disabilities in three ways. First, because it encourages Henry IV to restore the body politic disabled by Richard II, we can see the manuscript as presenting itself as a prosthesis able to compensate, even cure, Henry’s illegitimate claims to the throne. Here, disability is a condition that needs to be eradicated at best, repaired at least.

Second, because the Trentham manuscript reports Gower’s blindness, we can examine how it registers that disability. As “Henrici quarti primus” makes clear, Gower’s disability allows him to assert his own legitimacy ...


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