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The Roles And Behaviors Of A Medieval Housewife As Portrayed In Late Fourteenth Century Verse And Prose In Relation To Historical Record, Bradley Peppers 2015 Georgia State University

The Roles And Behaviors Of A Medieval Housewife As Portrayed In Late Fourteenth Century Verse And Prose In Relation To Historical Record, Bradley Peppers

Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Crossing Cultures: The Old Norse Adaptations Of Marie De France’S Lais, Kenna Jacobs 2015 University of Connecticut - Storrs

Crossing Cultures: The Old Norse Adaptations Of Marie De France’S Lais, Kenna Jacobs

The Quiet Corner Interdisciplinary Journal

The representation of sin and sexuality in Marie de France’s Lais is a topic that continues to be debated among scholars, as the unexpected storylines – including adultery, bestiality, and physical violence – often clash with our preconceived notions concerning the medieval principles of modesty and restraint. The provoking, even disconcerting, nature of this work becomes quite apparent when examined in conjunction with their later adaptations in the thirteenth century, as King Hákon of Norway commissioned the translation of several lais into Old Norse as a means of promoting the courtly codes and conventions within French literature. Focusing on the lais ...


The Knights Of The Front: Medieval History’S Influence On Great War Propaganda, Haley E. Claxton 2015 Kansas State University

The Knights Of The Front: Medieval History’S Influence On Great War Propaganda, Haley E. Claxton

Crossing Borders: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Scholarship

Spanning a number of academic areas, “Knights of the Front: Medieval History’s Influence on Great War Propaganda” focuses on the emergence of medieval imagery in the First World War propaganda. Examining several specific uses of medieval symbolism in propaganda posters from both Central and Allied powers, the article provides insight into the narrative of war, both politically and culturally constructed. The paper begins with an overview of the psychology behind visual persuasion and the history behind Europe’s cultural affinity for “chivalry,” then continues into specific case studies of period propaganda posters that hold not only themes of military ...


“For It Acordeth Noght To Kinde”: Remediating Gower’S Confessio Amantis In Machinima, Sarah L. Higley 2015 University of Rochester, NY

“For It Acordeth Noght To Kinde”: Remediating Gower’S Confessio Amantis In Machinima, Sarah L. Higley

Accessus

Visual adaptation of a medieval text, as tempting as it is in film of any kind, is never an easy conversion, and all the more so if the original is as formally structured as John Gower’s Confessio Amantis. This essay examines the philosophy and difficulties of making a “medieval motion picture” (animated and narrated by the author) reflect the message of three of Gower’s tales (“The Travelers and the Angel,” “Canace and Machaire,” “Florent”) as well as the multimedia properties of the manuscripts that house them, their illuminations beckoning us into colorful virtual worlds. In referencing theories of ...


Preface, Georgiana Donavin, Eve Salisbury 2015 Westminster College

Preface, Georgiana Donavin, Eve Salisbury

Accessus

Co-editors Georgiana Donavin and Eve Salisbury are delighted to feature the work of medievalist and machinimatographer Sarah L. Higley in this issue of Accessus. In a machinima production that debuted during the Third International Congress of the John Gower Society at the University of Rochester (30 June through 3 July, 2014), Higley refashions three tales from the Confessio Amantis for her film The Lover's Confession. In this issue of Accessus, we present the film and Higley's commentary on the intersections between her creative work with machinima and scholarly issues surrounding "The Tale of the Travelers and the Angel ...


Buddhism As Performing Art: Visualizing Music In The Tibetan Sacred Ritual Music Liturgies, Jeffrey W. Cupchik 2015 University of Calgary

Buddhism As Performing Art: Visualizing Music In The Tibetan Sacred Ritual Music Liturgies, Jeffrey W. Cupchik

Yale Journal of Music & Religion

The eleventh-century Tibetan female ascetic, Machik Labdrön (1055-1153), developed a Vajrayāna (Tantric) Buddhist meditation method called Chöd (Tib. gCod, Eng. “to cut”) and associated ritual practices as a means of eliminating “self-grasping,” which is defined as the mistaken instinct of regarding one’s “self” and all phenomena as intrinsically, or independently, existent. Her musical-meditation method became renowned across Central Asia during her lifetime, and Chödritual practices and liturgies have been transmitted from teacher to disciple in unbroken lineages until today. The ritual is now well known globally, with Tibetan Lamas, nuns, and empowered exponents teaching widely, across a transnational ...


Orphic Powers In J.R.R. Tolkien's Legend Of Beren And Lúthien, Jane Beal PhD 2015 University of California, Davis

Orphic Powers In J.R.R. Tolkien's Legend Of Beren And Lúthien, Jane Beal Phd

Journal of Tolkien Research

In “Orphic Powers in Tolkien’s Legend of Beren and Lúthien,” I consider three interrelated strands that influenced the development of Tolkien’s most precious story: Tolkien’s own life experience, sources from classical mythology and medieval literature, and the hope inherent to the Christian faith, especially for resurrection and eternal life, as symbolized in the Parable of the Pearl of Great Price. This study suggests that Tolkien’s relationship to his wife, Edith, inspires the legend and renders it a psychological allegory. Three Ovidian tales from classical mythology that were later re-told in medieval literature also influence it: the ...


The Rhetoric Of Exile In The Preaching And Teaching Of The Anglo-Saxon Church: Glimpses Of The Cultural Ideology In Old English Homilies, Yi-chin Huang 2015 Western Michigan University

The Rhetoric Of Exile In The Preaching And Teaching Of The Anglo-Saxon Church: Glimpses Of The Cultural Ideology In Old English Homilies, Yi-Chin Huang

The Hilltop Review

Abstract.

This article explores how the early medieval vernacular homiletic discourse produced in Anglo-Saxon England strategically employs the rhetoric exile, a theme whose significance is also articulated widely in Old English poetry. As words denoting such similar ideas as exile, banishment, exclusion, casting/driving out, etc., recur significantly in the homilies of the Anglo-Saxon Church, including the homilies of Ælfric, Wulfstan, and the Blickling and Vercelli Codices, I propose an analysis of the instances in which the rhetoric about exile is used in preaching and theology in order to reveal not only the Church authors/teachers’ ability and effort to ...


La Ubicua Presencia Del Moro: Maurofilia Y Maurofobia Literaria Como Productos De Consumo Cristiano, Ana I. Benito 2015 IPFW

La Ubicua Presencia Del Moro: Maurofilia Y Maurofobia Literaria Como Productos De Consumo Cristiano, Ana I. Benito

International Language and Culture Studies Faculty Publications

Maurophilia and maurophobia explained as a doubly fictional representation of Muslims as part of a process of selective cultural assimilation in Renaissance Castilian Literature.


The Evolution And Antithesis Of Western Music, Dan Rager 2015 Cleveland State University

The Evolution And Antithesis Of Western Music, Dan Rager

Daniel Rager

This article examines the Evolution and Antithesis of Western Music from early Biblical Times (3500 B.C.) through the Baroque Period (1600-1750 A. D.). The material presented encompasses many different cultures from around the world. Herein, the Sumerians, Babylonians, Greeks, Jews, Romans, and other cultures are examined. Religious and cultural ideologies clash while similarities parallel these mediums exposing juxtapositions that transcend throughout the ages.

The article discusses early musical systems, periodical musical practices, musical elements (voices vs. instruments) permitted and forbidden by the church, the use of sacred and secular music and the development of these “musical forms” which include ...


Three Late Medieval Kilns From The Athenian Agora, Camilla MacKay 2015 Bryn Mawr College

Three Late Medieval Kilns From The Athenian Agora, Camilla Mackay

Library Staff Research and Scholarship

This article presents pottery from three late medieval kilns excavated in the Athenian Agora in the 1930s. Wasters from the kilns provide important proof of the local production of lead-glazed wares that come into use in the early Ottoman period and are found in surveys and excavations throughout Attica and Boeotia. Some of this pottery has been identified as maiolica, but portable x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) analysis has not indicated the presence of tin in the glaze. While distinctive in appearance, the pottery from these kilns seems to continue the ceramic tradition of earlier medieval Athens.


“The Geographies Of 'Ajam: The Circulation Of Persian Poetry From South Asia To The Caucasus”, Rebecca Gould 2015 Yale-NUS College

“The Geographies Of 'Ajam: The Circulation Of Persian Poetry From South Asia To The Caucasus”, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

No abstract provided.


From The Holy Land To The Cloister: The Decline Of Female Ascetic Pilgrimages In The Early Medieval West (C. 350-615), Manon Williams 2015 University of Colorado, Boulder

From The Holy Land To The Cloister: The Decline Of Female Ascetic Pilgrimages In The Early Medieval West (C. 350-615), Manon Williams

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper will focus on the mobility of ascetic women from late antiquity through to the early Middle Ages with a particular emphasis on the practice of pilgrimage. As seen in multiple primary source documents, religious women from the West were journeying to the Holy Land and beyond from the fourth through to the early fifth centuries. This practice, however, is mentioned remarkably less in accounts of religious women north of the Alps in the late fifth century onwards. Evidence of women undertaking pilgrimages to the Holy Land is sparse while their male counterparts continued to make such journeys. Although ...


The Fisherman By Anonymous, Luke J. Chambers 2014 Western Michigan University

The Fisherman By Anonymous, Luke J. Chambers

Transference

Translated from the Old French with commentary by Luke Chambers.


With One's Own Arms: Condottieri, Machiavelli, And The Rise Of The Florentine Militia, Michael N. Boncardo 2014 Gettysburg College

With One's Own Arms: Condottieri, Machiavelli, And The Rise Of The Florentine Militia, Michael N. Boncardo

Student Publications

This paper examines the use of mercenary warfare on the Italian peninsula during the late 15th and early 16th centuries. It later focuses on the unique political and economic environment in Florence that led to Niccolo Machiavelli orchestrating the creation of the Florentine militia.


Student-Centered, Interactive Teaching Of The Anglo-Saxon Cult Of The Cross, Christopher R. Fee 2014 Gettysburg College

Student-Centered, Interactive Teaching Of The Anglo-Saxon Cult Of The Cross, Christopher R. Fee

English Faculty Publications

Although most Anglo-Saxonists deal with Old English texts and contexts as a matter of course in our research agendas, many of us teach relatively few specialized courses focused on our areas of expertise to highly-trained students; thus, many Old English texts and objects which are commonplace in our research lives can seem arcane and esoteric to a great many of our students. This article proposes to confront this gap, to suggest some ways of teaching a few potentially obscure texts and artifacts to undergrads, to offer some guidance about uses of technology in this endeavor, and to help fellow teachers ...


The Gawain-Poet And The Textual Environment Of Fourteenth-Century English Anticlericalism, Ethan Campbell 2014 City University of New York, Graduate Center

The Gawain-Poet And The Textual Environment Of Fourteenth-Century English Anticlericalism, Ethan Campbell

Dissertations and Theses, 2014-Present

The 14th-century Middle English poems Cleanness and Patience, homiletic retellings of biblical stories which appear in the same manuscript as Pearl and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, offer moral lessons to a general Christian audience, but the introduction to Cleanness, with its reference to men whom "prestez arn called," suggests that a central feature of their rhetoric is anticlerical critique. Priests do not appear as exemplars but as potentially filthy hypocrites who inspire God's harshest wrath, since their sins may contaminate Christ's body in the Eucharist.

Using Cleanness's opening lines as a guide, this dissertation reads ...


Primordia Coenobii Gandeshemensis: Hrotsvit Of Gandersheim As A Political Actor And Secular And Religious Power In Ottonian Saxony, Michael Janeček 2014 Lake Forest College

Primordia Coenobii Gandeshemensis: Hrotsvit Of Gandersheim As A Political Actor And Secular And Religious Power In Ottonian Saxony, Michael Janeček

First-Year Writing Contest

No abstract provided.


The [Ftaires!] To Remembrance: Language, Memory, And Visual Rhetoric In Chaucer's House Of Fame And Danielewski's House Of Leaves, Shannon Danae Kilgore 2014 University of Puget Sound

The [Ftaires!] To Remembrance: Language, Memory, And Visual Rhetoric In Chaucer's House Of Fame And Danielewski's House Of Leaves, Shannon Danae Kilgore

Honors Program Theses

Geoffrey Chaucer's dream poem The House of Fame explores virtual technologies of memory and reading, which are similar to the themes explored in Danielewski's House of Leaves. "[ftaires!]", apart from referencing the anecdotal (and humorous) misspelling of "stairs" in House of Leaves, is one such linguistically and visually informed phenomenon that speaks directly to how we think about, and give remembrance to, our own digital and textual culture. This paper posits that graphic design, illustrations, and other textual cues (such as the [ftaires!] mispelling in House of Leaves] have a subtle yet powerful psychological influence on our reading ...


The Auchinleck Manuscript: A Study In Manuscript Production, Scribal Innovation, And Literary Value In The Early 14th Century, Tricia Kelly George 2014 English Department

The Auchinleck Manuscript: A Study In Manuscript Production, Scribal Innovation, And Literary Value In The Early 14th Century, Tricia Kelly George

Doctoral Dissertations

The Auchinleck Manuscript (National Library of Scotland Advocates 19.2.1) was written in London by six scribes and contains 44 extant texts. This manuscript is an early 14th century English manuscript (c. 1331) best known for its many unique and first versions of texts, such as the first version of the Breton lay Sir Orfeo, a Breton adaptation of the Orpheus legend. It is also the first literary manuscript we have that is written almost entirely in English after the Norman Conquest. My research provides answers to some of the perennial questions raised by scholars concerning this manuscript ...


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