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Analog Versus Digital Guitar Pedals, Shaping Guitar Tones And Sparking Debates, Cameron Karren 2020 California State University, Monterey Bay

Analog Versus Digital Guitar Pedals, Shaping Guitar Tones And Sparking Debates, Cameron Karren

Capstone Projects and Master's Theses

This paper goes into the history of guitar effects, what exactly they are, how they have evolved, and what they are like today. It also presents the results of an experiment that compares perceptions of differences between analog and digital guitar pedals.


Memory Management For Game Audio Development, Rahmin Tehrani 2020 California State University, Monterey Bay

Memory Management For Game Audio Development, Rahmin Tehrani

Capstone Projects and Master's Theses

Research in managing memory for video game audio development. Interactive music and audio implementation are explored with a strong focus on how to manage data while developing game sound. Some concepts that are important include the multi-use of one sound, file conversion, and randomization in music and audio using technology. Additionally, audio middleware such as Wwise is referenced and strongly used to showcase the previously described concepts. The end of this research project explores the future in video game audio with information relative to the next generation of consoles, video game streaming, physical memory limitations and expansions, and the future ...


Trippy Sounds: Recording Studio Effects Of Psychedelic Rock, 1960s And Present, Theo Farnum 2020 California State University, Monterey Bay

Trippy Sounds: Recording Studio Effects Of Psychedelic Rock, 1960s And Present, Theo Farnum

Capstone Projects and Master's Theses

The psychedelic rock movement of the 1960s dominated popular music and culture of the decade. The movement was heavily shaped by the consumption of LSD, a mind-altering hallucinogenic drug. Songwriting and lyrics often reflected the drug and the states of mind that it induced, and unique cutting-edge production techniques were used to imitate the effects of LSD use. Artists such as The Beatles used new effects, such as phasing, artificial double tracking, tape loops, and reverse recording.

In the 21st century, music has again been described as psychedelic rock, though the music under that term is much more diverse. Bands ...


Balloon Pops, Convolution Reverb, And You!, Brandon Lucia 2020 California State University, Monterey Bay

Balloon Pops, Convolution Reverb, And You!, Brandon Lucia

Capstone Projects and Master's Theses

Balloon Pops and You! The Audio essence of CSUMB This project involves convolution reverb. I'm sure you’ve used reverb before when making music. Scientifically a reverb is a self-contained echo. Most reverbs are digital, either logorhymic or algorthymic. Convolution Reverb is different from regular reverb. A convolution reverb attempts to capture the essence of a physical space. The can be done with a few different methods such as sine sweep or transients. If you have ever seen the wave form of a snare drum, you will notice it will have a steep attack with a short decay, the ...


Finding Music In Chaos: Designing And Composing With Virtual Instruments Inspired By Chaotic Equations, Landon P. Viator 2020 Louisiana State University

Finding Music In Chaos: Designing And Composing With Virtual Instruments Inspired By Chaotic Equations, Landon P. Viator

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

Using chaos theory to design novel audio synthesis engines has been explored little in computer music. This could be because of the difficulty of obtaining harmonic tones or the likelihood of chaos-based synthesis engines to explode, which then requires re-instantiating of the engine to proceed with sound production. This process is not desirable when composing because of the time wasted fixing the synthesis engine instead of the composer being able to focus completely on the creative aspects of composition. One way to remedy these issues is to connect chaotic equations to individual parts of the synthesis engine instead of relying ...


Surrogate Memories In Animation And Sound, Jared Duesterhaus 2020 Virginia Commonwealth University

Surrogate Memories In Animation And Sound, Jared Duesterhaus

Theses and Dissertations

A document in support of my exploration into memory in relation to the mediums of animation, sound, and theater. A reflection on remembering as a creative act.


Editorial: Subjectivity And Objectivity In Storytelling Podcasts, Siobhan McHugh 2019 University of Wollongong

Editorial: Subjectivity And Objectivity In Storytelling Podcasts, Siobhan Mchugh

RadioDoc Review

In this issue, storytelling podcasts and audio works from the US, UK, Australia and Canada receive in-depth critiques from expert reviewers in Latin America, Australia and the UK. The subjectivity-objectivity spectrum is one focus, along with ethics and aesthetics.


Consent: Objectivity And The Aesthetics Of Re-Enactment In Locative Audio Journalism About A Sexual Assault Trial, Jeanti St Clair 2019 Southern Cross University, Lismore

Consent: Objectivity And The Aesthetics Of Re-Enactment In Locative Audio Journalism About A Sexual Assault Trial, Jeanti St Clair

RadioDoc Review

Consent – walk the walk, a geo-locative audio documentary walk in St. John’s, Canada, explores a 2017 sexual assault trial that led to days of protests in the Newfoundland city: an on-duty police officer is charged with sexually assaulting an intoxicated woman he drove home from the town’s nightclub precinct. Producers Chris Brookes and Emily Deming’s work of ‘landscape journalism’ was designed to highlight the tension between popular and legal understandings of the term ‘consent’ in sexual assaults. While the audio walk is a compelling place-based listening experience, Consent raises issues around the impact of dramatised re-enactment in ...


Radio Revolten: 30 Days Of Radio Art - Book Review, Colin Black 2019 University of Wollongong

Radio Revolten: 30 Days Of Radio Art - Book Review, Colin Black

RadioDoc Review

Radio Revolten: 30 Days of Radio Art documents the Radio Revolten international radio art festival that took place took place during October 2016 in Halle, Germany. It is a densely rich book that explores aspects of radio beyond the format, beyond time schedules and beyond podcast ratings, while still aiming to build a sense of community. It is reviewed by internationally acclaimed Australian sound artist Colin Black.


Skywriting – Making Radio Waves By Robyn Ravlich: Book Review, Mike Ladd 2019 Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Skywriting – Making Radio Waves By Robyn Ravlich: Book Review, Mike Ladd

RadioDoc Review

Robyn Ravlich’s Skywriting - making radio waves is partly an extended dissertation on feature-making and radio art, and partly an autobiography of this acclaimed Australian audio feature maker from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). It is reviewed by Mike Ladd, poet, audio producer and an erstwhile ABC colleague.


Video Game Audio Techniques Applied To Board Game Companion Applications, Jaydon Osborn 2019 California State University, Monterey Bay

Video Game Audio Techniques Applied To Board Game Companion Applications, Jaydon Osborn

Capstone Projects and Master's Theses

Video games have been one of the most popular forms of entertainment since the turn of the 20th century. Starting in pinball machines that developed into arcade games and now lovingly into virtual reality, console, and handheld gaming systems, video games have become a normal factor in people's lives. It is no mystery why they are so popular; games not only give us a sense of accomplishment beyond what our physical and mental limits could achieve, but also evoke our imaginations by drawing us into a new world that is magical or something we would never have seen before ...


"Choir" By Pope.L At The Whitney, Matthew Sage 2019 Northeastern Illinois University

"Choir" By Pope.L At The Whitney, Matthew Sage

Faculty Research and Creative Activities Symposium

Pope.L is an acclaimed Chicago-based artist whose work with painting, performance, and installations has received much praise and increased attention. This October he installed Choir at the prestigious Whitney Museum in New York City; this new installation focuses on his continued exploration of water in gallery spaces. For Choir, a 1,000-gallon water tank that acts as a public fountain was installed at the gallery. The tank fills and drains over a roughly 40- minute span of time. NEIU part-time faculty member Matthew Sage (CMT department) was asked to create, design, and collaborate on sound components to accompany this ...


In The Dark – Pushing The Boundaries Of True Crime, Sharon Davis 2019 University of Technology, Sydney

In The Dark – Pushing The Boundaries Of True Crime, Sharon Davis

RadioDoc Review

True crime podcasts are a burgeoning genre. As journalists and storytellers, how do we balance the pursuit of justice and our responsibility to the victims with the demand to tell a gripping tale? As listeners, are we using the pain of others for our own entertainment? In the Dark podcast (Seasons 1 and 2) takes us beyond a vicarious fascination with true crime stories into a forensic and essential look at deep-rooted biases, corruption and systemic failures that prevent justice from being served.

The first season (2016) investigates the 1989 kidnapping, sexual assault and murder of 11-year-old Jacob Wetterling In ...


The Feelings Frontier: A Review Of No Feeling Is Final, Britta Jorgensen 2019 Swinburne University

The Feelings Frontier: A Review Of No Feeling Is Final, Britta Jorgensen

RadioDoc Review

No Feeling is Final faces a two-fold “feelings frontier” in an age of extreme podcast intimacy and empathy: navigating (1) how to convey the kind of deeply personal “big feelings” that are still often seen as off-limits and (2) how to maintain a hyper-awareness about the listener’s feelings. Taking place almost entirely within her mind, No Feeling is Final is a six-part memoir show about host Honor Eastly’s experiences struggling with mental health and what one mental health professional diagnoses as “too many feelings – about four times as many as the average person”. The ongoing tension between creating ...


Have You Heard George’S Podcast (It's A True Original), Hugh Levinson 2019 BBC Radio Current Affairs

Have You Heard George’S Podcast (It's A True Original), Hugh Levinson

RadioDoc Review

The podcast, Have You Heard George’s Podcast, is a true original. Made by George Mpanga, who goes by the stage name of George the Poet, it won five awards at the 2018 British Podcast Awards – in fiction and non-fiction categories. The son of Ugandan immigrants, George went to an elite state school in north London before taking a degree at Cambridge.

The podcast takes on big themes - empowering George’s community, self-belief, crime, drugs, racism, inequality and international politics. Stylistically, the eight-part series is a mash-up: poetry, sketches, interviews, archive, music, performance and sometimes off-mike chat with his producer ...


Does Spotify Really Hurt Artists?, Daniel Witt 2019 Brigham Young University

Does Spotify Really Hurt Artists?, Daniel Witt

Marriott Student Review

For years, members of the music industry have debated whether music streaming services like Spotify help or hurt artists. This article explores the pros and cons of music streaming and argues that overall, Spotify and services like it are helping artists to achieve their career goals.


One Story, Told Week By Week: Episodic Podcast Storytelling And The Habitat, Charlotte De Beauvoir 2019 Los Andes University, Bogotá

One Story, Told Week By Week: Episodic Podcast Storytelling And The Habitat, Charlotte De Beauvoir

RadioDoc Review

The rise and success of podcasting introduced episodic storytelling in the world of non-fiction sound narrative. Delivering a story in different entries is very different from producing a one-off piece. What concrete implications does this have for the narrative? And what keeps an audience listening to a podcast, episode through episode? This article offers some answers to these questions via a case study of The Habitat, a 2018 podcast by the American network Gimlet.


Down But Not Out: Tara And George And The Boundaries Of Subjectivity., Hamish Sewell 2019 Storiedland

Down But Not Out: Tara And George And The Boundaries Of Subjectivity., Hamish Sewell

RadioDoc Review

Set on the streets of London, amidst the snarl of traffic and the clip of passers by, this work is a biographical sound portrait of two homeless people, Tara and George. It is a testament to the parlous state of homelessness in the UK today and is masterful in its execution.

To this work, producer and host Audrey Gillan brings a quality of frank disclosure and decency. Relationships between producers and their subjects are contentious, due to an inherent power differential. Gillan neither portrays Tara and George as archetypes nor as helpless and needy. She knows she is the one ...


Conversations About Everything, Kim Judge, Pawel Tomaszewski, Mark B N Ingham Dr 2019 UAL/CSM

Conversations About Everything, Kim Judge, Pawel Tomaszewski, Mark B N Ingham Dr

Organizational Aesthetics

Conversations about Everything is based on a three way conversation about a performative educational project called Mapping Strange Assemblages. This was a part of UAL/London College of Communication‘s contribution the 2018 London Design Festival and the Design School’s Public Programme. It rhizomatically maps out the interventions by a group of students and alumni who where named the Band of Animateurs (BOAs). As an assemblages it attempts to create a visual and narrative affect that mirrored the performances during the Exhibition, Everything Happens So Much’.


From Harmony To The Field, Steven E. Norton 2019 University of Maine

From Harmony To The Field, Steven E. Norton

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This document expounds a brief history of Western musical art, from the mid-nineteenth century to the beginning of the twenty first, which traces the complete transformation of its expressive means and materials. Examined are the changes to Western music’s basic materials such as pitch system, timbral palette and formal architecture. We observe as these aspects are dismantled, supplanted by a dramatically expanded sonic palette and subsequently expanded ranges of expression and topical consideration. This brief historiography contextualizes my current working theories and methods for the construction and understanding of electroacoustic music, centered around the idea of The Field, which ...


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