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Coleridge, Thoreau, And The Transatlantic ‘Riddle Of The World', Samantha Harvey 2016 Boise State University

Coleridge, Thoreau, And The Transatlantic ‘Riddle Of The World', Samantha Harvey

Samantha Harvey

[No abstract available.]


Thoreau And Romanticism, Samantha Harvey 2016 Boise State University

Thoreau And Romanticism, Samantha Harvey

Samantha Harvey

[No abstract available.]


From Slave Cabins To The White House: Homemaking Anxiety In African American Culture, Koritha Mitchell 2016 Ohio State University - Main Campus

From Slave Cabins To The White House: Homemaking Anxiety In African American Culture, Koritha Mitchell

Koritha Mitchell

A book-length study of what I call "homemaking anxiety," which I first began defining in the article "Mamie Bradley's Unbearable Burden." It is "the palpable tension that emerges when African Americans, especially women, continue to invest in homemaking even while seeing the signs that it won't yield for them the respectability or safety that it should." This project traces the imprint this tension has left on black cultural production, from slavery to the Age of Michelle Obama. Performance theory influences my examination of a wide array of texts—whether novels, plays, or the performance text that is Mrs ...


Scotland And The Caribbean, Jo DuRant 2016 University of Glasgow

Scotland And The Caribbean, Jo Durant

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses (and summarizes) Michael Morris's recent book Scotland and the Caribbean, c. 1740-1833, concluding that it should be welcomed, not only as an introduction to specific writers, but as a good introduction to recent debates on the legacy of Caribbean slavery, as seen from a Scottish perspective.


Edinburgh Monuments, The Literary Canon, And Cultural Nationalism: A Comparative Perspective, Silvia Mergenthal 2016 University of Konstantz

Edinburgh Monuments, The Literary Canon, And Cultural Nationalism: A Comparative Perspective, Silvia Mergenthal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Building on comparative studies of the "memory landscapes" of cities and monuments, describes three different monument series in Edinburgh, the Canongate Wall at the Scottish Parliament building at Holyrood, the flagstone quotations in Makar's Court near the Writers' Museum, and the grouped herms in the Edinburgh Business Park; discusses how the authors included in each series were selected and how each relates to the formal and informal Scottish literary canon; and briefly indicates what comparative scholarship suggests about the relation of such monuments to the development of cultural nationalism.


Mobbing, (Dis)Order And The Literary Pig In The Tale Of Colkelbie Sow, Pars Prima, Caitlin Flynn 2016 University of St Andrews

Mobbing, (Dis)Order And The Literary Pig In The Tale Of Colkelbie Sow, Pars Prima, Caitlin Flynn

Studies in Scottish Literature

Sets the portrayal of the pig in the anonymous Scots fifteenth-century poem The Tale of Colkelbie Sow in the context of medieval fears of social disorder and mob rule, drawing on medieval accounts of the criminal trials of unruly pigs and other animals, and recent discussions of Scottish and medieval literary humour.


Alexander Arbuthnot And The Lyric In Post-Reformation Scotland, Joanna Martin 2016 University of Nottingham

Alexander Arbuthnot And The Lyric In Post-Reformation Scotland, Joanna Martin

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents the first critical discussion of manuscript poems in the Maitland Quarto attributable to Alexander Arbuthnot (1538-1583), the first Protestant principal of King's College, Aberdeen; gives detailed discussion of attribution and textual issues; and discusses the effects of religious change on Arbuthnot's writing of amatory, ethical and devotional lyric in post-Reformation Scotland.


'Rebellious Highlanders': The Reception Of Corsica In The Edinburgh Periodical Press, 1730-1800, Rhona Brown 2016 University of Glasgow

'Rebellious Highlanders': The Reception Of Corsica In The Edinburgh Periodical Press, 1730-1800, Rhona Brown

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines the way Scottish periodicals, especially the Weekly Magazine and the Caledonian Mercury, reported and discussed the nationalist resistance in Corsica against first Genoese and then French rule; recalibrates the role of James Boswell in shaping Scottish opinion about Corsica, especially in his Account of Corsica (1768); notes the parallels made by Scottish commentators between the Corsican resistance under Pascal Paoli and the Scottish highlands, especially the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745; and suggests the value of looking at the distinctive responses of Scottish periodicals, not just the print networks based on London.


“Your Reclamation”: The Gothic Child And Moral Restoration In Charles Dickens’S A Christmas Carol, Ashten Roberts 2016 University of Southern Mississippi

“Your Reclamation”: The Gothic Child And Moral Restoration In Charles Dickens’S A Christmas Carol, Ashten Roberts

Master's Theses

Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol (1843), an example of Victorian Gothic literature, portrays spirits escorting Ebenezer Scrooge on a journey through time in order to transform him from a miser to a benefactor. Dickens’s text has received much critical attention, and while most critics agree that the novella includes various elements of the gothic, few draw attention to the possibility of the child characters as gothic elements. I argue that Carol’s child characters can be read in terms of what Margarita Georgieva calls “the gothic child.” According to Georgieva, the gothic child can be an adult’s ...


The Poet's Corpus: Memory And Monumentality In Wilfred Owen's "The Show", Charles Hunter Joplin 2016 The University of Southern Mississippi

The Poet's Corpus: Memory And Monumentality In Wilfred Owen's "The Show", Charles Hunter Joplin

Master's Theses

Wilfred Owen is widely recognized to be the greatest English “trench poet” of the First World War. His posthumously published war poems sculpt a nightmarish vision of trench warfare, one which enables Western audiences to consider the suffering of the English soldiers and the brutality of modern warfare nearly a century after the armistice. However, critical readings of Owen’s canonized corpus, including “The Show” (1917, 1918), only focus on their hellish imagery. I will add to these readings by demonstrating that “The Show” is primarily concerned with the limitations of lyric poetry, the monumentality of poetic composition, and the ...


Decolonizing The Ya North: Environmental Injustice In Sherri L. Smith’S Orleans, Micah-Jade M. Coleman 2016 The University of Southern Mississippi

Decolonizing The Ya North: Environmental Injustice In Sherri L. Smith’S Orleans, Micah-Jade M. Coleman

Master's Theses

Young Adult (YA) dystopias, in recent years, have imagined a future world fueled by the overuse and misuse of technology, the advancement of science for human gain, as well as societies ruled by governments that govern based on their own self-interests and economic gain. Such novels have opened the door for discussion about how the present-day actions of societies can impact the future of the environment; yet many only focus their attention on societies in the North— regions considered “developed” by the western world. In her YA novel, Orleans (2014), Sherri L. Smith focuses attention on the aftermath of Hurricane ...


"Too Big To Swallow All At Once": Consumption And Posthuman Healing In Ceremony And House Made Of Dawn, Matthew Thomas Craft 2016 University of Southern Mississippi

"Too Big To Swallow All At Once": Consumption And Posthuman Healing In Ceremony And House Made Of Dawn, Matthew Thomas Craft

Master's Theses

This project examines the roles of animals and animal figures in the Native American novels House Made of Dawn (1968)by N. Scott Momaday and Ceremony (1977) by Leslie Marmon Silko. Both novelists consistently evoke animal imagery within their respective texts often pairing this imagery alongside symbolic and metaphorical depictions of cannibalistic identity violence. Through the use of posthuman and postcolonial methodologies and ideas, I contend that the pairing of these two distinct types of imagery that both Momaday and Silko intentionally align the animal figures with premodern, indigenous belief systems while the cannibalistic violence is more often envisioned as ...


Poor, Pitiful Monsters From Homer To Borges, Robin McAllister 2016 Sacred Heart University

Poor, Pitiful Monsters From Homer To Borges, Robin Mcallister

English Faculty Publications

This article reviews famous monsters in Western literature that reveal a hidden humanity or affinity with the hero that elicits compassion or emphasizes their bestiality in surprising ways. Their monstrosity is often a distorted mirror image of the hero’s humanity. Shakespeare’s Caliban is a famous example of the affinity between monster and protagonist. Homer’s Polyphemus, the first monster in Western tradition establishes certain traits that persist through later literature: lawless, barbarian, cannibal, and giant. Polyphemus hates men, but loves his old ram. Grendel, Grendel’s mother, and the dragon in Beowulf are giants, lawless, cannibals. The dragon ...


Thoughts On African American Literature From The Imsa English Department, Michael Dean, Michael W. Hancock, Leah Kind, Adam Kotlarczyk, Erin Micklo, Tracy A. Townsend 2016 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Thoughts On African American Literature From The Imsa English Department, Michael Dean, Michael W. Hancock, Leah Kind, Adam Kotlarczyk, Erin Micklo, Tracy A. Townsend

Adam Kotlarczyk

This document is the product of an online collaborative discussion inspired by Black History Month that took place between members of the IMSA English team during the first week of February in 2015. In this conversation, English faculty ruminate on the importance of African American literature as teachers, as individuals, and as lifelong learners.


Teaching Tolkien: Language, Scholarship, And Creativity, Adam Kotlarczyk 2016 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Teaching Tolkien: Language, Scholarship, And Creativity, Adam Kotlarczyk

Adam Kotlarczyk

Why Tolkien?

Let us start with the obvious—if cynical—question, almost certain to come from a skeptical administrator or colleague: why would any serious, self-respecting English teacher want to teach an author whose work is about dragons, fairies, and the fantastic? With all the increased attention to standardized testing and with the demand for rigor in read- ings in the average English curriculum, choosing a popular text might raise eyebrows among critics. The question that an English teacher may be asked (or indeed, may ask him- or herself) is: doesn't teaching Tolkien as "serious" literature just fan those ...


Booker T. Washington And W.E.B. Du Bois: Guiding Students To Historical Context, Adam Kotlarczyk 2016 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Booker T. Washington And W.E.B. Du Bois: Guiding Students To Historical Context, Adam Kotlarczyk

Adam Kotlarczyk

Seldom have two vastly different visions been expressed as clearly and as elegantly as in Booker T. Washington’s Atlanta Exposition Address (1895) and W.E.B. Du Bois’s “Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others” (from The Souls of Black Folk, 1903). Awash in memorable rhetoric, these competing philosophies foresaw very different paths for America, and for black social progress, at the dawn of the twentieth century.

This lesson introduces students to the ideas and informational texts of Washington and DuBois while challenging students to research some of the historical context in which these men lived, worked, and ...


Thoughts On African American Literature From The Imsa English Department, Michael Dean, Michael W. Hancock, Leah Kind, Adam Kotlarczyk, Erin Micklo, Tracy A. Townsend 2016 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Thoughts On African American Literature From The Imsa English Department, Michael Dean, Michael W. Hancock, Leah Kind, Adam Kotlarczyk, Erin Micklo, Tracy A. Townsend

Adam Kotlarczyk

This document is the product of an online collaborative discussion inspired by Black History Month that took place between members of the IMSA English team during the first week of February in 2015. In this conversation, English faculty ruminate on the importance of African American literature as teachers, as individuals, and as lifelong learners.


The Novel Of Sentiment In A Short Story: Reflections On Teaching “Theresa”, Adam Kotlarczyk 2016 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

The Novel Of Sentiment In A Short Story: Reflections On Teaching “Theresa”, Adam Kotlarczyk

Adam Kotlarczyk

I introduced “Theresa” in between units on “The Age of Reason” and “American Romanticism.” Thus it was foregrounded by works like Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography and Phyllis Wheatley’s “On Being Brought from Africa to America,” and followed by stories by Irving, Hawthorne, and Poe. Strictly speaking, this puts “Theresa” slightly out of sequence; its serialization in 1828 precedes by at least ten years the works of Poe, Hawthorne, and Irving that we study. Despite this, the text functioned well as a transitional piece, although I would consider moving it deeper into the Romantic unit. The exotic setting, relative to ...


Teaching Tolkien: Language, Scholarship, And Creativity, Adam Kotlarczyk 2016 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Teaching Tolkien: Language, Scholarship, And Creativity, Adam Kotlarczyk

Adam Kotlarczyk

Why Tolkien?

Let us start with the obvious—if cynical—question, almost certain to come from a skeptical administrator or colleague: why would any serious, self-respecting English teacher want to teach an author whose work is about dragons, fairies, and the fantastic? With all the increased attention to standardized testing and with the demand for rigor in read- ings in the average English curriculum, choosing a popular text might raise eyebrows among critics. The question that an English teacher may be asked (or indeed, may ask him- or herself) is: doesn't teaching Tolkien as "serious" literature just fan those ...


Booker T. Washington And W.E.B. Du Bois: Guiding Students To Historical Context, Adam Kotlarczyk 2016 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Booker T. Washington And W.E.B. Du Bois: Guiding Students To Historical Context, Adam Kotlarczyk

Adam Kotlarczyk

Seldom have two vastly different visions been expressed as clearly and as elegantly as in Booker T. Washington’s Atlanta Exposition Address (1895) and W.E.B. Du Bois’s “Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others” (from The Souls of Black Folk, 1903). Awash in memorable rhetoric, these competing philosophies foresaw very different paths for America, and for black social progress, at the dawn of the twentieth century.

This lesson introduces students to the ideas and informational texts of Washington and DuBois while challenging students to research some of the historical context in which these men lived, worked, and ...


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