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Marlowe's Translations Of Ovid And Lucan, M. L. Stapleton 2015 Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne

Marlowe's Translations Of Ovid And Lucan, M. L. Stapleton

English and Linguistics Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Review Of Marilyn Francus, Monstrous Motherhood: Eighteenth-Century Culture And The Ideology Of Domesticity, Phyllis Ann Thompson 2014 University of South Florida

Review Of Marilyn Francus, Monstrous Motherhood: Eighteenth-Century Culture And The Ideology Of Domesticity, Phyllis Ann Thompson

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

Review of Marilyn Francus. Monstrous Motherhood: Eighteenth-Century Culture and the Ideology of Domesticity. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins UP, 2012. Xi + 297pp. Index. ISBN 978-1-4214-0737-1.


Review Of Stephen Bending, Green Retreats: Women, Gardens And Eighteenth-Century Culture, Nicolle Jordan 2014 University of South Florida

Review Of Stephen Bending, Green Retreats: Women, Gardens And Eighteenth-Century Culture, Nicolle Jordan

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

Review of Stephen Bending. Green Retreats: Women, Gardens and Eighteenth-Century Culture. New York: Cambridge UP, 2013. X +312 pp. Index. ISBN: 978-1-107-04002-1.


Discomforting Narratives: Teaching Eighteenth-Century Women’S Travelogues, Elizabeth Zold 2014 University of South Florida

Discomforting Narratives: Teaching Eighteenth-Century Women’S Travelogues, Elizabeth Zold

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

In this essay, I describe an undergraduate course I designed and taught on eighteenth-century women’s travelogues and advocate for more courses that explicitly focus on noncanonical genres and authors. Using student papers, I explore how students worked through their discomfort with new genre conventions and improved their overall reading and analytical skills. I hope that my outline of the course will be useful to those who teach or will be teaching women's travel literature or who wish to focus courses on noncanonical authors and genres.


In Their Hands: Students Editing Eighteenth- And Nineteenth-Century Letters, Thomas McLean 2014 University of South Florida

In Their Hands: Students Editing Eighteenth- And Nineteenth-Century Letters, Thomas Mclean

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

This article describes an honours-year class conducted in 2013 at the University of Otago in New Zealand. Students transcribed, annotated and wrote essays about a little-known New Zealand collection of unpublished letters written by leading British women writers of the Romantic era. Their research was then collected and published as a book entitled "In Her Hand: Letters of Romantic-Era British Women Writers in New Zealand Collections." The success of this course suggests the benefits of allowing students the opportunity to undertake original archival research and serves as a reminder that rich archival collections are found all over the world.


John Steinbeck's Hispanic Character Names, Marcia D. Yarmus 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

John Steinbeck's Hispanic Character Names, Marcia D. Yarmus

Literary Onomastics Studies

No abstract provided.


"Up To A Point": Onomastic Devices And Satire In Evelyn Waugh's Scoop, Leonard R.N. Ashley 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

"Up To A Point": Onomastic Devices And Satire In Evelyn Waugh's Scoop, Leonard R.N. Ashley

Literary Onomastics Studies

Ezra Pound defined literature as "news that stays news," and this study of names in a work of fiction that, though minor in its author's oeuvre, is important in modern literature deals with news reporting in mass-communication newspapers, the area of what John Carey has called "the greatest change in human consciousness that has taken place in recorded history."1 The novel is Scoop. It offers especially rich material for the student of how satirical names function in literature to score intellectual points, to set a tone, to banter and to be profound, to assist the writer with his ...


Disappearing Letters And Breaking Rules: John Irving As Namer, Jack D. Wages 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Disappearing Letters And Breaking Rules: John Irving As Namer, Jack D. Wages

Literary Onomastics Studies

Among a number of interesting contemporary American novelists is John Irving, whose first three novels were inventive and entertaining; his second three works, however, are particularly remarkable. With The World Accordjng to Garp (1978), The Hotel New Hampshire (1981), and most recently Cider House Rules (1985) Irving has taken, as one reviewer observes, "a quantum leap forward" not only as a story teller, but also as a novelist who makes use of numerous and varied techniques related to names and naming. From the ribald puns on place names and a memorable demonstration of the intricate relationships between one's very ...


Naming In Philip Roth's Goodbye, Columbus, William A. Francis 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Naming In Philip Roth's Goodbye, Columbus, William A. Francis

Literary Onomastics Studies

Philip Roth's novella Goodbye, Columbus is a story of summer love shared by Neil Klugman and Brenda Patimkin. The lovers come from very different worlds, and the differences between the lovers contribute considerably to their breaking up at summer's end. Below the surface of the story Philip Roth weaves a subtle and complex series of motifs, the understanding of which affords the reader insights into the private inner world of Neil. Among the motifs is an onomastic one, the primary focus of this paper, but one that must be considered along with motifs of ironic and mock battles ...


Joyce Cary's Onomastic "Orchestration": Name, Symbol, And Theme In The Horse's Mouth, Ramona Kelley Stamm 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Joyce Cary's Onomastic "Orchestration": Name, Symbol, And Theme In The Horse's Mouth, Ramona Kelley Stamm

Literary Onomastics Studies

Like many of his literary contemporaries, Joyce Cary maintains a more than superficial interest in the power of the word. Many modernist writers share with him an ambivalent attitude toward the word. To some degree, they hold the belief that words are worn out, obsolete, or otherwise inadequate to express the concerns of the twentieth century. On one hand, they are dissatisfied with the word, but on the other, they are forced to contend with the word as the only means of expression they have, yet many of them eventually come to see the word as still being capable of ...


Women's Names In The English Renaissance Elegy, Dorothy E. Litt 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Women's Names In The English Renaissance Elegy, Dorothy E. Litt

Literary Onomastics Studies

The funeral elegy of the English Renaissance has great onomastic interest; as a literary genre it is primarily an eponymous poem whose hero is the dead person being celebrated. The name, moreover, figures in the poet's attempt to participate in a triadic process whereby as the body is buried in the ground the soul progresses toward heaven and the name of the dead subject is immortalized.


Looking Again At James Currie's Inventory: The Other Side Of The Burns Correspondence, Patrick G. Scott, Joseph C. DuRant 2014 University of South Carolina

Looking Again At James Currie's Inventory: The Other Side Of The Burns Correspondence, Patrick G. Scott, Joseph C. Durant

Faculty Publications

This powerpoint presentation, based on editorial work in progress by the presenters for the forthcoming Letters Addressed to Robert Burns, 1779-1796, briefly describes the larger project and then explores one of the major project sources, James Currie's inventory of the letters in Burns's possession at the time of his death, to show the range of his correspondence and how some of the brief inventory letter-summaries can be expanded by research. The presentation was created to accompany a videorecorded talk for Project Symposium no. 3: "Textual Landmarks," for the AHRC-funded project Editing Robert Burns for the 21st Century, Center ...


Hooray For Hollywood: Onomastic Techniques In Bemelmans' Dirty Eddie, Leonard R.N. Ashley 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Hooray For Hollywood: Onomastic Techniques In Bemelmans' Dirty Eddie, Leonard R.N. Ashley

Literary Onomastics Studies

Curs, canine or human, tend to bite the hand that feeds them. Therefore it is not surprising that a lot of satirical barbs have been flung by writers at the dream factories of Hollywood where so many of them have labored. There is a long list of obscure plays about Tinsel Town: Hey Diddle Diddle (Cormack), Schoolhouse on the Lot (Fields and Chodorov), The Greatest Find Since Garbo (Birchard and Bard), On Location (Wiley), Dearly Beloved (Beahan and Buckner), Kiss the Boys Goodbye (Boothe), Hollywood Be Thy Name (Fagan), Stars in Your Eyes (McEvoy), and the list goes on. Some ...


Of Madness And Machines: Names In Ken Kesey's One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, William A. Francis 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Of Madness And Machines: Names In Ken Kesey's One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, William A. Francis

Literary Onomastics Studies

Included here is the introductory paragraph of the article.

Ken Kesey's first novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, reflects his experiences as a young attendant in two California mental hospitals in which he was employed. Book reviewers spoke highly of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and recognized the authority with which Kesey captured the day-to-day routines and events in mental wards. Irving Malin observed that One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a gothic novel, for it employs imprisonment, madness, violence and distorted reflections, but it does so in a new way which Malin ...


Lexemes Into Names, Brenna E. Lorenz 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Lexemes Into Names, Brenna E. Lorenz

Literary Onomastics Studies

In lieu of an abstract, this is the opening paragraph of the article.

Nominization (a term proposed by W. H. F. Nicolaisen in a personal communication, 1988) is a mechanism of name formation that involves the conversion of a lexeme into a name. The opposite is generally called commonization, by which a name is converted into a lexeme. Dr. Nicolaisen has suggested that lexemization would be a more accurate term.


Tom Stoppard And Ferenc Molnar: A Comparison Of Onomastics, Elizabeth M. Rajec 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Tom Stoppard And Ferenc Molnar: A Comparison Of Onomastics, Elizabeth M. Rajec

Literary Onomastics Studies

In lieu of an abstract, the introductory paragraph is included here.

Tom Stoppard's hilarious play Rough Crossing was premiered in London in 1984. It had been freely adapted from Ferenc Molnar's classic farce Jatek a kastelyban (literally 'Play at the Castle'). The original play was first produced in Budapest in 1925. Most likely Stoppard's adaptation is based on P. G. Wodehouse's English translation known as The Play's the Thing which premiered in 1926 at the Henry Miller Theatre in New York.


Name-Calling As Power Play In Shakespeare's 1 Henry Iv, Frederick M. Burelbach 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Name-Calling As Power Play In Shakespeare's 1 Henry Iv, Frederick M. Burelbach

Literary Onomastics Studies

In lieu on an abstract, here are a few sentences from an early paragraph of the article.

The main premise of this paper is that name-calling- as when youngsters call each other Fatty, Skinny, or Sissy-is a form of authorship as well as an instrument used in maintaining social norms. The name-caller is creating a specific role for the victim by use of a name with particular denotations, connotations, and assumed social values. By so doing, the name-caller is defining an appropriate scope of action or behavior, with expected patterns of response to external events- a plot, if you will- ...


Nominal Jests In Shakespeare's Plays, Dorothy E. Litt 2014 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Nominal Jests In Shakespeare's Plays, Dorothy E. Litt

Literary Onomastics Studies

In lieu of an abstract, this is the first paragraph of the article.

Nominal jests were very popular among the literati of the English Renaissance. The plays and poems of the period are studded with name-play, and Shakespeare, with his lively mind, excelled at the game. 1 Much has been written of his jests on his own name in the Sonnets 2 and on his name usage in the plays. 3 Although much name-play may at times seem trivial or obvious, when it appears in a consistent pattern linked to the play's function we may gain insight into Shakespeare ...


(In)Famous Cover Tunes Of 2014, Simon Orpana 2014 Wilfrid Laurier University

(In)Famous Cover Tunes Of 2014, Simon Orpana

The Goose

A cartoon and commentary by Simon Orpana.


The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug, Gregory Chad Wilkes 2014 University of Nebraska Omaha

The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug, Gregory Chad Wilkes

Journal of Religion & Film

This is a film review of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (2013), directed by Peter Jackson.


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