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Coleridge, Thoreau, And The Transatlantic ‘Riddle Of The World', Samantha Harvey 2016 Boise State University

Coleridge, Thoreau, And The Transatlantic ‘Riddle Of The World', Samantha Harvey

Samantha Harvey

[No abstract available.]


Thoreau And Romanticism, Samantha Harvey 2016 Boise State University

Thoreau And Romanticism, Samantha Harvey

Samantha Harvey

[No abstract available.]


From Slave Cabins To The White House: Homemaking Anxiety In African American Culture, Koritha Mitchell 2016 Ohio State University - Main Campus

From Slave Cabins To The White House: Homemaking Anxiety In African American Culture, Koritha Mitchell

Koritha Mitchell

A book-length study of what I call "homemaking anxiety," which I first began defining in the article "Mamie Bradley's Unbearable Burden." It is "the palpable tension that emerges when African Americans, especially women, continue to invest in homemaking even while seeing the signs that it won't yield for them the respectability or safety that it should." This project traces the imprint this tension has left on black cultural production, from slavery to the Age of Michelle Obama. Performance theory influences my examination of a wide array of texts—whether novels, plays, or the performance text that is Mrs ...


Scotland And The Caribbean, Joseph DuRant 2016 University of Glasgow

Scotland And The Caribbean, Joseph Durant

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses (and summarizes) Michael Morris's recent book Scotland and the Caribbean, c. 1740-1833, concluding that it should be welcomed, not only as an introduction to specific writers, but as a good introduction to recent debates on the legacy of Caribbean slavery, as seen from a Scottish perspective.


Alexander Arbuthnot And The Lyric In Post-Reformation Scotland, Joanna Martin 2016 University of Nottingham

Alexander Arbuthnot And The Lyric In Post-Reformation Scotland, Joanna Martin

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents the first critical discussion of manuscript poems in the Maitland Quarto attributable to Alexander Arbuthnot (1538-1583), the first Protestant principal of King's College, Aberdeen; gives detailed discussion of attribution and textual issues; and discusses the effects of religious change on Arbuthnot's writing of amatory, ethical and devotional lyric in post-Reformation Scotland.


Edinburgh Monuments, The Literary Canon, And Cultural Nationalism: A Comparative Perspective, Silvia Mergenthal 2016 University of Konstantz

Edinburgh Monuments, The Literary Canon, And Cultural Nationalism: A Comparative Perspective, Silvia Mergenthal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Building on comparative studies of the "memory landscapes" of cities and monuments, describes three different monument series in Edinburgh, the Canongate Wall at the Scottish Parliament building at Holyrood, the flagstone quotations in Makar's Court near the Writers' Museum, and the grouped herms in the Edinburgh Business Park; discusses how the authors included in each series were selected and how each relates to the formal and informal Scottish literary canon; and briefly indicates what comparative scholarship suggests about the relation of such monuments to the development of cultural nationalism.


Mobbing, (Dis)Order And The Literary Pig In The Tale Of Colkelbie Sow, Pars Prima, Caitlin Flynn 2016 University of St Andrews

Mobbing, (Dis)Order And The Literary Pig In The Tale Of Colkelbie Sow, Pars Prima, Caitlin Flynn

Studies in Scottish Literature

Sets the portrayal of the pig in the anonymous Scots fifteenth-century poem The Tale of Colkelbie Sow in the context of medieval fears of social disorder and mob rule, drawing on medieval accounts of the criminal trials of unruly pigs and other animals, and recent discussions of Scottish and medieval literary humour.


'Rebellious Highlanders': The Reception Of Corsica In The Edinburgh Periodical Press, 1730-1800, Rhona Brown 2016 University of Glasgow

'Rebellious Highlanders': The Reception Of Corsica In The Edinburgh Periodical Press, 1730-1800, Rhona Brown

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines the way Scottish periodicals, especially the Weekly Magazine and the Caledonian Mercury, reported and discussed the nationalist resistance in Corsica against first Genoese and then French rule; recalibrates the role of James Boswell in shaping Scottish opinion about Corsica, especially in his Account of Corsica (1768); notes the parallels made by Scottish commentators between the Corsican resistance under Pascal Paoli and the Scottish highlands, especially the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745; and suggests the value of looking at the distinctive responses of Scottish periodicals, not just the print networks based on London.


You've Gotta Read This: Summer Reading At Musselman Library (2016), Musselman Library 2016 Gettysburg College

You've Gotta Read This: Summer Reading At Musselman Library (2016), Musselman Library

You’ve Gotta Read This: Summer Reading at Musselman Library

Each year, Musselman Library asks Gettysburg College faculty, staff, and administrators to help create a suggested summer reading list. Our goal is to inspire students and the rest of our community to take time in the summer to sit back, relax, and read.

With the 2016 collection, we again bring together recommendations from across our campus—the books, movies, TV shows, and even musicals that have meant something special to us over the past year. 124 faculty, administrators and staff offer up a record number of 226 recommendations.

We include five special features this year. Two of our regular columnists ...


A Dark Record: Criminal Discourse And The African American Literary Project, 1721-1864, Brian Baaki 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

A Dark Record: Criminal Discourse And The African American Literary Project, 1721-1864, Brian Baaki

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

A Dark Record charts the emergence and traces the evolution of a central figure in American culture, the myth of the black criminal. It does so both to explore the ideological effects of print, and to present an alternative history of African American literature. Historians have long maintained that the association of African Americans with crime solidified in our national culture during the post-Reconstruction period, the nadir for African American civil rights, with a corresponding rise in the over-policing of black individuals and communities. For its part, my study looks back from the post-Reconstruction period, and examines the role earlier ...


Fragmentation And Multiplicity In Cuban-American Identity: In Cuba I Was A German Shepherd By Ana Menéndez And Memory Mambo By Achy Obejas, Daimys E. Garcia 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Fragmentation And Multiplicity In Cuban-American Identity: In Cuba I Was A German Shepherd By Ana Menéndez And Memory Mambo By Achy Obejas, Daimys E. Garcia

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Maria Lugones offers a new way of perceiving the world, which makes visible that fragmentation is not a valuable and transgressive understanding of identity, as Western philosophy and some political theory suggests. What Lugones believes in, as a strategy of resistance to the dominant gaze, is multiplicity – mestizaje. Using Lugones’s framework, this thesis will look at the different aspects of Cuban-American characters in In Cuba I was a German Shepherd by Ana Menéndez and Memory Mambo by Achy Obejas. Each novel offers insight into how characters develop and understand themselves (and others) when they use language that shows that ...


Paratextuality And Contemporary Narrative: The Physical Object As A Storytelling Device, James Mason 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Paratextuality And Contemporary Narrative: The Physical Object As A Storytelling Device, James Mason

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This paper examines how the physical and para-textual features (title, cover, front matter, page numbers, footnotes, glossary, etc.) of a book may be used as a vehicle for narrative discovery. Often, reading requires the use of extra-textual knowledge—that which comes from outside the book—to gain a proper understanding of the narrative. Intra-textual knowledge—that which occurs within the confines of the text—is more accessible, but still requires a great deal of foreknowledge to understand. However, contemporary novels that use the paratext for storytelling offer the same amount of accessibility to the reader while disrupting normal reading patterns ...


Revisiting Digital Sampling Rhetorics With An Ethic Of Care, Jared Sterling Colton 2016 Utah State University

Revisiting Digital Sampling Rhetorics With An Ethic Of Care, Jared Sterling Colton

English Faculty Publications

Rhetoric and composition studies have conceptualized and defined digital sampling as a method of composition in many ways and for various pedagogical purposes: from a means of free-play invention that is critical of more formalistic writing practices to a semiotic strategy rooted in African American rhetorical traditions designed to effect political change. The latter view is critical of the former in that the former does not account for student digital sampling projects that unquestioningly appropriate from other people and communities. This is a real pedagogical problem, but students can create unethical and hurtful digital sampling projects, no matter the assignment ...


Silence, Power, And Mexicans In Willa Cather's The Song Of The Lark, Sefferino Ramos 2016 California State University - San Bernardino

Silence, Power, And Mexicans In Willa Cather's The Song Of The Lark, Sefferino Ramos

Electronic Theses, Projects, and Dissertations

In The Song of the Lark (1915), Willa Cather does something extraordinary by presenting a well-rounded and likeable Mexican character. This is quite different from her contemporaries’ stereotypical depictions of minorities. To include immigrants in a modern novel was avant-garde and radical subject matter; and presenting a realistic, likeable Mexican character was unheard of because the colonized and immigrants were largely ignored in American literature, or deliberately overlooked. When they were included, persistent demeaning views and unflattering Mexican stereotypes were the norm. This paper seeks to explain how positively Cather depicts Mexican characters, decades before Civil Rights. Cather includes the ...


So What's Your Point? Relevancy In Conversation, Frank Bramlett 2016 University of Nebraska at Omaha

So What's Your Point? Relevancy In Conversation, Frank Bramlett

Frank Bramlett

Every rare once in a while, I find myself caught in a conversation where the person I'm talking to goes off on a tangent. And I don't mean a little aside. I mean a "What the hell are you talking about!?" tangent.

Luckily, for the other 99% of conversations, there are some general guidelines for engagement that help us avoid making mistakes like this one. H. Paul Grice, a language philosopher, is the scholar credited with first writing about these rules in a widespread way. Grice theorized that participants in conversation operate by an overarching approach that we ...


What Are Functional Shifts?, Frank Bramlett 2016 University of Nebraska at Omaha

What Are Functional Shifts?, Frank Bramlett

Frank Bramlett

In last month's column, I wrote about variety in word formation processes, the phenomenon of having more than one word form lo represent the same concept, illustrated by word pairs like analysis/analyzation, summary/ summarization, and intensity/intenseness. There is, of course, the other side of the coin. We also use single word forms to represent an array of meanings.


What Part English, What Part Spanish?, Frank Bramlett 2016 University of Nebraska at Omaha

What Part English, What Part Spanish?, Frank Bramlett

Frank Bramlett

Back in July, I was sitting in my office at school, working on a syllabus for a new sophomore- level class on language and society. I was exploring the U.S. Census Bureau website to get a sense of the most current information we have about language communities in the United States. I had the radio on, too, and while I was browsing census data about Nebraska, I heard an advertisement on one of the FM stations. The ad was primarily an English-language ad, but it also had a few Spanish words. It turned out to be a job advertisement ...


What Are Conversation Systems?, Frank Bramlett 2016 University of Nebraska at Omaha

What Are Conversation Systems?, Frank Bramlett

Frank Bramlett

The study of conversation as a serious field of inquiry began in the1970s when sociologists Harvey Sacks, Emmanuel Schegloff and Gail Jefferson first turned our attention to the way people talk to each other. Interestingly, they began looking at talk not for the sake of talk itself but instead as a way to understand social interactions. They collected samples of conversations and analyzed them to help answer questions that sociologists (not necessarily linguists) are interested in answering. For instance, how do people manage their daily lives through talk? How do people establish, maintain, improve and end relationships with each other ...


Y'All Better Ask Somebody, Frank Bramlett 2016 University of Nebraska at Omaha

Y'All Better Ask Somebody, Frank Bramlett

Frank Bramlett

One of the ways that linguists think about language is through geographical distribution, commonly known as dialects. It's very easy to think about geography because of the wide range of locales in which English is spoken. Due to conquest and colonization, English is now a world language. There's British English, Australian English, and Nigerian English, among many others. In the continental U.S., most people readily identify a number of regional dialects: “Midwestern," "New England," "Southern." While some people might call them accents, linguists distinguish between dialect and accent. The term accent refers solely to the way words ...


Name Trouble - Part Two, Frank Bramlett 2016 University of Nebraska at Omaha

Name Trouble - Part Two, Frank Bramlett

Frank Bramlett

While Shakespeare was busy with names in Romeo and Juliet, Europeans began exploring and settling the New World and immediately ran into the problem of naming. For instance, what should they call those enormous mammals that look sort of like cows but are larger, stronger, and furrier? Buflalo? Bison? Tatanka? And what should they call all the people they kept running into? Tradition holds that Christopher Columbus started it. He was confused because of geography; he thought he had found India, so he called the native people he met by the Spanish word indios, the English counterpart of which is ...


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