Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Privacy Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

3,287 Full-Text Articles 3,150 Authors 1,871,019 Downloads 139 Institutions

All Articles in Privacy Law

Faceted Search

3,287 full-text articles. Page 90 of 92.

Flexing Judicial Muscles: Did The Ninth Circuit Abandon Judicial Restraint In United States V. Comprehensive Druge Testing, Inc.?, Allen H. Quist 2010 Brigham Young University Law School

Flexing Judicial Muscles: Did The Ninth Circuit Abandon Judicial Restraint In United States V. Comprehensive Druge Testing, Inc.?, Allen H. Quist

Brigham Young University Journal of Public Law

No abstract provided.


Gina's Genotypes, David H. Kaye 2010 Pennsylvania State University, Dickinson School of Law

Gina's Genotypes, David H. Kaye

Michigan Law Review First Impressions

In August 2009, the Board of Trustees of the University of Akron added to the university's employment policy the following proviso: "any applicant may be asked to submit fingerprints or DNA sample for purpose of a federal criminal background check." Although the federal government does not do background checks with DNA, the policy is significant because it highlights a largely unexplored feature of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 ("GINA"). Hailed by the late Senator Edward Kennedy as "the first civil rights bill of the new century of life sciences," GINA generally prohibits employers from asking for "genetic ...


A Fourth Amendment For The Poor Alone: Subconstitutional Status And The Myth Of The Inviolate Home, Jordan C. Budd 2010 University of New Hampshire School of Law

A Fourth Amendment For The Poor Alone: Subconstitutional Status And The Myth Of The Inviolate Home, Jordan C. Budd

Law Faculty Scholarship

For much of our nation’s history, the poor have faced pervasive discrimination in the exercise of fundamental rights. Nowhere has the impairment been more severe than in the area of privacy. This Article considers the enduring legacy of this tradition with respect to the Fourth Amendment right to domestic privacy. Far from a matter of receding historical interest, the diminution of the poor’s right to privacy has accelerated in recent years and now represents a powerful theme within the jurisprudence of poverty. Triggering this development has been a series of challenges to aggressive administrative practices adopted by localities ...


People Can Be So Fake: A New Dimension To Privacy And Technology Scholarship, M. Ryan Calo 2010 University of Washington School of Law

People Can Be So Fake: A New Dimension To Privacy And Technology Scholarship, M. Ryan Calo

Articles

This article updates the traditional discussion of privacy and technology, focused since the days of Warren and Brandeis on the capacity of technology to manipulate information. It proposes a novel dimension to the impact of anthropomorphic or social design on privacy.

Technologies designed to imitate people-through voice, animation, and natural language-are increasingly commonplace, showing up in our cars, computers, phones, and homes. A rich literature in communications and psychology suggests that we are hardwired to react to such technology as though a person were actually present.

Social interfaces accordingly capture our attention, improve interactivity, and can free up our hands ...


There Is A Time To Keep Silent And A Time To Speak, The Hard Part Is Knowing Which Is Which: Striking The Balance Between Privacy Protection And The Flow Of Health Care Information, Daniel J. Gilman, James C. Cooper 2010 Federal Trade Commission

There Is A Time To Keep Silent And A Time To Speak, The Hard Part Is Knowing Which Is Which: Striking The Balance Between Privacy Protection And The Flow Of Health Care Information, Daniel J. Gilman, James C. Cooper

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

Health information technology (HIT) has become a signal element of federal health policy, especially as the recently enacted American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act or ARRA) comprises numerous provisions related to HIT and commits tens of billions of dollars to its development and adoption. These provisions charge various agencies of the federal government with both general and specific HIT-related implementation tasks including, inter alia, providing funding for HIT in various contexts: the implementation of interoperable HIT, HIT-related infrastructure, and HIT-related training and research. The Recovery Act also contains various regulatory provisions pertaining to HIT. Provisions of the ...


Substitution Effects: A Problematic Justification For The Third-Party Doctrine Of The Fourth Amendment, Blake Ellis Reid 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Substitution Effects: A Problematic Justification For The Third-Party Doctrine Of The Fourth Amendment, Blake Ellis Reid

Articles

In the past half-century, the Supreme Court has crafted a vein of jurisprudence virtually eliminating Fourth Amendment protection in information turned over to third parties - regardless of any subjective expectation of privacy or confidentiality in the information on the part of the revealer. This so-called “third-party” doctrine of the Fourth Amendment has become increasingly controversial in light of the growing societal reliance on the Internet in the United States, where nearly every transaction requires a user to turn information over to at least one third party: the Internet service provider (“ISP”).

Citing the scholarship that has criticized the third-party doctrine ...


Beyond Fair Use, Gideon Parchomovsky, Philip J. Weiser 2010 University of Pennsylvania Law School; Bar Ilan University, Faculty of Law, Israel

Beyond Fair Use, Gideon Parchomovsky, Philip J. Weiser

Articles

For centuries, the fair use doctrine has been the main--if not the exclusive--bastion of user rights. Originating in the English courts of equity, the doctrine permitted users, under appropriate circumstances, to employ copyrighted content without the rightsholder's consent. In the current digital media environment, however, the uncertainty that shrouds fair use and the proliferation of technological protection measures undermine the doctrine and its role in copyright policy. Notably, the enactment of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which prohibits the circumvention of technological protection measures even for fair use purposes, has diminished the ability of fair use to counterbalance a ...


Lock The Closet Door: Does Private Mean Secret, Whitney Kristen McBride 2010 University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law

Lock The Closet Door: Does Private Mean Secret, Whitney Kristen Mcbride

McGeorge Law Review

No abstract provided.


Cyberwar Policy, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 303 (2010), Matthew Borton, Samuel Liles, Sydney Liles 2010 John Marshall Law School

Cyberwar Policy, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 303 (2010), Matthew Borton, Samuel Liles, Sydney Liles

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Cyberwarfare is a very real threat to the security of the nation. Yet there is confusion and disagreement as to which government body is most appropriate to assume the cyberwar mission. The Strategy to Secure Cyberspace treats the threat primarily as a criminal issue, and assigns responsibility to the Department of Homeland Security. The National Defense Strategy implies that cyberwarfare is a military issue. Both documents may be correct, depending on the case. The cyberspace terrain transcends boundaries, quickly blurring the line between civil or criminal action and an act of war, leaving the government with the issue of assigning ...


The Cathedral And The Bizarre: An Examination Of The "Viral" Aspects Of The Gpl, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 349 (2010), Michael F. Morgan 2010 John Marshall Law School

The Cathedral And The Bizarre: An Examination Of The "Viral" Aspects Of The Gpl, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 349 (2010), Michael F. Morgan

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

While there is a growing body of literature dealing with the General Public License (“GPL”), the potential viral effects of the GPL do not appear to have been analyzed in a detailed technical manner. This paper will attempt to demonstrate that a proper legal analysis of the viral effects of the GPL is dependent on a detailed technical understanding of the specific mechanisms used for each type of program-to-program interaction. Once these technical mechanisms are properly understood it will then be possible to identify the applicable copyright law needed to assess the viral effects of the GPL.


Firearm Transaction Disclosure In The Digital Age: Should The Government Know What Is In Your Home?, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 497 (2010), Elaine Vullmahn 2010 John Marshall Law School

Firearm Transaction Disclosure In The Digital Age: Should The Government Know What Is In Your Home?, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 497 (2010), Elaine Vullmahn

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This comment examines the primary arguments for continuing to prohibit the federal government from establishing a federal firearm registry. The Background section of this comment surveys the development of laws restricting firearm sales and requiring federal firearm licensed dealers to maintain pertinent records. This section also describes how, if enacted, the Blair Holt’s Firearm Licensing and Registration Act of 2009, known as H.R. 45, would, through the creation of federal firearm registry, expose electronic records of private citizens’ firearm purchases and ownership to possible government abuse. The Analysis section examines why H.R. 45 is not the correct ...


Cyber Fatwās And Classical Islamic Jurisprudence, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 577 (2010), Derek John Illar 2010 John Marshall Law School

Cyber Fatwās And Classical Islamic Jurisprudence, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 577 (2010), Derek John Illar

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The first section of this paper will explain what fatwâs are, why they are important, and what is the relationship between fatwâs and the Islamic judiciary. This section will also address who can issue such opinions and how scholars reach their conclusions. In the second part of this paper, I will explore the recent emergence of cyber fatwâs. This section specifically will focus on how Muslims have used this medium and how fatwâs have manifested themselves therein. The third portion of this paper will identity the problems that cyber fatwâs create and why they fail to comport with particular tenets ...


Increasing Access To Startup Financing Through Intellectual Property Securitization, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 613 (2010), Kyle Tondo-Kramer 2010 John Marshall Law School

Increasing Access To Startup Financing Through Intellectual Property Securitization, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 613 (2010), Kyle Tondo-Kramer

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

This paper will discuss how a private company running a single, nationwide database for filing financing agreements can ease the burden on creditors and pave the way for more creditors to enter this market. Part two offers a brief overview of how intellectual property securitization works and some of the impediments to using this type of securitization. Part three proposes a possible solution to the problem creditors face regarding the filing of a financing statement when attempting to securitize intellectual property, and provides an in depth analysis as to why the suggestion that a private company runs a single, nationwide ...


300 Years Of Copyright Law? A Not So Modest Proposal For Reform, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 1 (2010), James GH Griffin 2010 John Marshall Law School

300 Years Of Copyright Law? A Not So Modest Proposal For Reform, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 1 (2010), James Gh Griffin

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

2010 sees the three hundredth anniversary of the U.K.'s Statute of Anne 1710. This paper suggests that with the increased ability of content recipients to re-use works, there is a need to readdress the concerns of stakeholders, namely authors, publishers and content recipients. The paper sets out in detail how this should be achieved. To do so, it utilises the notion of creativity as the benchmark by which to balance the interests of stakeholders. This has been used in early eighteenth century case law in the U.K., and there are also other historical and theoretical justifications. The ...


The Olympic Meddle: The International Olympic Committee's Intrusion Of Athletes' Privacy Through The Discriminatory Practice Of Gender Verification Testing, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 49 (2010), Raheel Saleem 2010 John Marshall Law School

The Olympic Meddle: The International Olympic Committee's Intrusion Of Athletes' Privacy Through The Discriminatory Practice Of Gender Verification Testing, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 49 (2010), Raheel Saleem

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The IOC and the IAAF act as governing bodies for athletes and, therefore, are innately responsible for their actions. However, the gender verification rule exemplifies that irresponsible actions by these governing agencies adversely effects its athletes. The gender verification rule empowers both the IOC and the IAAF to make life-changing decisions without any restriction, leaving athletes susceptible to the unfettered power and abuse of the rule. The legal foundation established by the international human rights declarations support the argument that gender verification testing must be abolished because of its embedded discrimination and intrusive nature. An application of the ICCPR provides ...


The Twenty-Ninth Annual John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For Petitioner, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 119 (2010), Kelly Foss, Vince Lombardozzi, Jared Palmer 2010 John Marshall Law School

The Twenty-Ninth Annual John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For Petitioner, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 119 (2010), Kelly Foss, Vince Lombardozzi, Jared Palmer

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The circuit court erred when it granted summary judgment in favor of MarshCODE because Mr. Murphy has demonstrated facts to support the elements of the (1) defamation, (2) false light invasion of privacy, and (3) breach of contract claims. First, Mr. Murphy has provided facts to support the defamation claim. MarshCODE made a false and defamatory statement about Mr. Murphy when it told Ms. Who that he was her father. Because this matter concerns Mr. Murphy's private life, a negligence standard applies rather than the First Amendment's actual malice standard. Mr. Murphy has demonstrated that MarshCODE acted either ...


The Twenty-Ninth Annual John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For Respondent, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 151 (2010), Kimberly Hodgman, Jody Rodenberg, Erin Tyler 2010 John Marshall Law School

The Twenty-Ninth Annual John Marshall International Moot Court Competition In Information Technology And Privacy Law: Brief For Respondent, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 151 (2010), Kimberly Hodgman, Jody Rodenberg, Erin Tyler

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The First District Court of Appeals properly affirmed summary judgment on behalf of MarshCODE because Appellant failed to raise a genuine issue of material fact on his defamation claim. First, MarshCODE's accidental disclosure of information, which implied that Appellant participated in premarital sex or had a homosexual child, was not defamatory because an average person would not lower his estimation or be deterred from associating with Appellant based on such a statement. Second, no publication was made because MarshCODE did not act with negligence and was unaware of the program malfunction that resulted in the release of the information ...


Protecting Consumers From Spyware: A Proposed Consumer Digital Trespass Act, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 185 (2010), Richard G. Kunkel 2010 John Marshall Law School

Protecting Consumers From Spyware: A Proposed Consumer Digital Trespass Act, 28 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 185 (2010), Richard G. Kunkel

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

“Spyware” is a broad term used to describe software that resides on a user’s computer and monitors the user’s online behavior. Though spyware may be helpful or benign, it can also be used for malicious purposes, commonly classified as “malware”. Consumers, who lack sophistication to avoid unintentionally downloading spyware, are especially vulnerable to the threat of malware. In lieu of this threat, it is important to understand the nature and scope of spyware problems affecting consumers. The paper will discuss how common law tort theories of trespass and trespass to chattel are difficult to apply to spyware, and ...


Law School & The Web Of Group Affiliation: Socializing, Socialization, And Social Network Site Use Among Law Students, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 325 (2010), Eric M. Fink 2010 John Marshall Law School

Law School & The Web Of Group Affiliation: Socializing, Socialization, And Social Network Site Use Among Law Students, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 325 (2010), Eric M. Fink

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Online social network sites (“SNS”) have emerged as a significant socio-technical phenomenon in the past several years. Scholars from various disciplines have examined these sites to develop a better understanding of their social significance and implications from a variety of perspectives. Within the burgeoning field of SNS studies, one strand of work focuses on the place of SNSs in students’ educational experiences and the potential pedagogical applications of SNSs. However, the SNS phenomenon generally, and its educational/pedagogical significance in particular, have received scant attention from legal scholars. This article examines the place of SNSs within the contemporary law school ...


How Safe Is This Shore? - Data Protection And Bpos In India, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 539 (2010), Kritika Bharadwaj 2010 John Marshall Law School

How Safe Is This Shore? - Data Protection And Bpos In India, 27 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 539 (2010), Kritika Bharadwaj

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

India has one of the fastest growing demographics of personal computer and Internet usage, following the U.S. and the U.K. In the light of this progress, there is no doubt that India has benefited from the worldwide process of outsourcing. On the same note, the service offered by India has rendered her indispensible to countries around the world, including the U.S. and the U.K. However, where convenience, speed, and accessibility are taken for granted in this digital era, this paradigm shift has consequently resulted in changes in its management and control, safeguard measures, and a surge ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress