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Criticism, Confusion Over California’S Proposition 19 Property Tax Amendments, Berenice Quirino 2021 Golden Gate University School of Law

Criticism, Confusion Over California’S Proposition 19 Property Tax Amendments, Berenice Quirino

GGU Law Review Blog

Proposition 19, the California measure narrowly approved by voters last November, created a tax break for some and tax hikes for others. Proponents of the measure tout the new tax revenue stream for the state as well as benefits for some of its vulnerable residents. In contrast, those opposed argue it disproportionately benefits wealthy, white residents while hurting people of color and low-income Californians.

The measure amended the California constitution by adding new sections to Article XIII A, which relates to tax limitations. As of April 1, 2021, Proposition 19 removes certain restrictions for eligible homeowners who transfer their home ...


Are Parent-Child Transfers Under California Prop 19 Destroying The Ability To Create Generational Wealth?, Golden Gate University School of Law 2021 Golden Gate University School of Law

Are Parent-Child Transfers Under California Prop 19 Destroying The Ability To Create Generational Wealth?, Golden Gate University School Of Law

GGU Law Review Blog

On November 3, 2020, California voters narrowly voted to pass Proposition 19 (Prop 19) which affects how California homeowners are able to pass on property to family members. Effective on February 16, 2021, parents attempting to pass on their family home to children are now inadvertently restricting how their children can and will use the home.


Brief Of Amici Curiae Scholars Of The Law Of Non-Profit Organizations In Support Of Respondent: Americans For Prosperity Foundation V. Matthew Rodriguez, Nos. 19-251 & 19-255, Ellen P. Aprill, Roger Colinvaux, Sean Delany, James Fishman, Brian D. Galle, Philip Hackney, Jill R. Horwitz, Cindy Lott, Ray D. Madoff, Jill S. Manny, Nancy A. McLaughlin, Richard Schmalbeck 2021 Loyola Law School Los Angeles

Brief Of Amici Curiae Scholars Of The Law Of Non-Profit Organizations In Support Of Respondent: Americans For Prosperity Foundation V. Matthew Rodriguez, Nos. 19-251 & 19-255, Ellen P. Aprill, Roger Colinvaux, Sean Delany, James Fishman, Brian D. Galle, Philip Hackney, Jill R. Horwitz, Cindy Lott, Ray D. Madoff, Jill S. Manny, Nancy A. Mclaughlin, Richard Schmalbeck

Amici Briefs

The twelve individuals filing this amicus brief are professors and scholars of the law of nonprofit organizations. No party in this case represents all three of charity’s key stakeholders: charities, states, and taxpayers who underwrite the charities’ funding. Amici are participating in this litigation in order to aid the Court in understanding how these three interests depend on one another. They also attempt to provide a clearer understanding of state supervision of charities and how that supervision related to federal tax law.


Taxing Cloud Computing Proves To Be Just That--Taxing, Emily A. Ivers 2021 Boston College Law School

Taxing Cloud Computing Proves To Be Just That--Taxing, Emily A. Ivers

Boston College Law Review

In February 2020, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, in Citrix Systems, Inc. v. Commissioner of Revenue ruled that the sale of cloud computing subscriptions was subject to state sales tax because it was a transfer of tangible personal property. This was the first time a state’s highest court decided on the taxability of cloud computing products. As the industry continues to grow at a rapid pace, states have struggled to determine how to tax it. Some states find these products to be a non-taxable service, whereas others stretch their definitions of tangible personal property to allow taxation. This Comment ...


How Tax Competition May Be Exacerbating Inequalities Among Washington Counties, Fabio Ambrosio 2021 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

How Tax Competition May Be Exacerbating Inequalities Among Washington Counties, Fabio Ambrosio

University of St. Thomas Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


The Spirit Is Willing: A Proposal For American Single Malt Whiskey, Raymond Cleaveland 2021 Seattle University School of Law

The Spirit Is Willing: A Proposal For American Single Malt Whiskey, Raymond Cleaveland

Seattle University Law Review

Over the past twenty-five years, small, independent American distilleries have carved out a new niche in the United States liquor market: craft single malt whiskey. Inspired by the success of single malt Scotch and other single malts, American craft distillers are now fighting for their own shelf behind the bar and in the liquor store aisle. In 2018, a cadre of these distillers petitioned the U.S. Treasury Department’s Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau to formally recognize a new category of whiskey in the Code of Federal Regulations: American Single Malt Whiskey. For purposes of consumer protection ...


Information Matters In Tax Enforcement, Leandra Lederman, Joseph C. Dugan 2021 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Information Matters In Tax Enforcement, Leandra Lederman, Joseph C. Dugan

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Most scholars recognize both that the government needs information about taxpayers’ transactions to determine whether their reporting is honest, and that third third-party reporting helps the government obtain that information. Given governments’ reliance on tax collections, it would be risky to think that information or third third-party reporting is not needed by tax agencies. However, a recent article by Professor Wei Cui asserts that “modern governments can practice ‘taxation without information.’” Professor Cui’s argument rests on two claims: (1) “giving governments effective access to taxpayer information through third parties does not explain the success of modern tax administration” because ...


The Carbon Price Equivalent: A Metric For Comparing Climate Change Mitigation Efforts Across Jurisdictions, Gabriel Weil 2021 Climate Leadership Council & Georgetown University Law Center

The Carbon Price Equivalent: A Metric For Comparing Climate Change Mitigation Efforts Across Jurisdictions, Gabriel Weil

Dickinson Law Review

Climate change presents a global commons problem: Emissions reductions on the scale needed to meet global targets do not pass a domestic cost-benefit test in most countries. To give national governments ample incentive to pursue deep decarbonization, mutual interstate coercion will be necessary. Many proposed tools of coercive climate diplomacy would require a onedimensional metric for comparing the stringency of climate change mitigation policy packages across jurisdictions. This article proposes and defends such a metric: the carbon price equivalent. There is substantial variation in the set of climate change mitigation policy instruments implemented by different countries. Nonetheless, the consequences of ...


Political Justice And Tax Policy: The Social Welfare Organization Case, Philip Hackney 2021 University of Pittsburgh School of Law

Political Justice And Tax Policy: The Social Welfare Organization Case, Philip Hackney

Articles

In addition to valuing whether a tax policy is equitable, efficient, and administrable, I argue we should ask if a tax policy is politically just. Others have made a similar case for valuing political justice as democracy in implementing just tax policy. I join that call and highlight why it matters in one arena – tax exemption. I argue that politically just tax policy does the least harm to the democratic functioning of our government and may ideally enhance it. I argue that our right to an equal voice in collective decision making is the most fundamental value of political justice ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2021 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


A Major Simplification Of The Oecd’S Pillar 1 Proposal, Michael J. Graetz 2021 Columbia Law School

A Major Simplification Of The Oecd’S Pillar 1 Proposal, Michael J. Graetz

Faculty Scholarship

In this report, Graetz suggests major modifications to the OECD’s pillar 1 blueprint proposal to create a new taxing right for multinational digital income and some product sales that would greatly simplify the proposal. The modifications rely on readily available existing financial information and would achieve certainty in the application of pillar 1, while adhering to its fundamental structure and policies.


Decoupling State Income Tax From Federal: Current Taxation Of Unrealized Gain, The New York Proposal, Henry Ordower 2021 Saint Louis University School of Law

Decoupling State Income Tax From Federal: Current Taxation Of Unrealized Gain, The New York Proposal, Henry Ordower

All Faculty Scholarship

A proposal decouples NY from federal tax computations to tax billionaires on unrealized appreciation. If enacted, the proposal generates basis discontinuities across borders but enhances state revenue and may prove attractive to many states. The article reviews how states seek to enhance revenues and considers issues of cross-border taxation and the fundamental right to travel.


Taxing Local Energy Externalities, Hannah J. Wiseman 2020 Professor of Law; Professor and Wilson Faculty Fellow in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences; Co-funded Faculty—Institutes of Energy and the Environment, the Pennsylvania State University—University Park

Taxing Local Energy Externalities, Hannah J. Wiseman

Notre Dame Law Review

There is a fundamental problem of scale in the governance of industrial development. For some of the fastest-growing U.S. industries, the negative impacts of development fall primarily at the local level, and the benefits tend to accrue more broadly to states and the federal government. These governments accordingly have inadequate incentives to address the very localized negative externalities of development. Yet states also increasingly preempt most local control over some forms of development. This creates a regulatory void, in which state and federal regulations are inadequate, and local governments lack the power to use traditional Pigouvian tools such as ...


Subsidizing Economic Segregation Through The State And Local Tax Deduction, Gladriel Shobe 2020 University of California, Irvine School of Law

Subsidizing Economic Segregation Through The State And Local Tax Deduction, Gladriel Shobe

UC Irvine Law Review

Economic segregation has increased over the past half-century. The trend of rich localities getting richer while poor localities get poorer is particularly concerning because it limits upward mobility and perpetuates intergenerational income inequality. This Article makes the novel argument that the state and local tax deduction subsidizes economic segregation. It arrives at that conclusion by showing that the “local tax deduction” provides a greater subsidy, per capita, for wealthy, economically segregated localities because only those localities have a critical mass of wealthy taxpayers who claim the deduction. This allows wealthy localities, but not poor localities, to provide services at a ...


Information Matters In Tax Enforcement, Leandra Lederman, Joseph C. Dugan 2020 Brigham Young University Law School

Information Matters In Tax Enforcement, Leandra Lederman, Joseph C. Dugan

BYU Law Review

Most scholars recognize both that the government needs information about taxpayers’ transactions to determine whether their reporting is honest, and that third third-party reporting helps the government obtain that information. Given governments’ reliance on tax collections, it would be risky to think that information or third third-party reporting is not needed by tax agencies. However, a recent article by Professor Wei Cui asserts that “modern governments can practice ‘taxation without information.’” Professor Cui’s argument rests on two claims: (1) “giving governments effective access to taxpayer information through third parties does not explain the success of modern tax administration” because ...


Enough Is As Good As A Feast, Noah C. Chauvin 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Enough Is As Good As A Feast, Noah C. Chauvin

Seattle University Law Review

Ipse Dixit, the podcast on legal scholarship, provides a valuable service to the legal community and particularly to the legal academy. The podcast’s hosts skillfully interview guests about their legal and law-related scholarship, helping those guests communicate their ideas clearly and concisely. In this review essay, I argue that Ipse Dixit has made a major contribution to legal scholarship by demonstrating in its interview episodes that law review articles are neither the only nor the best way of communicating scholarly ideas. This contribution should be considered “scholarship,” because one of the primary goals of scholarship is to communicate new ...


The Case For State Borrowing As A Response To The Current Crisis, David Gamage, Darien Shanske 2020 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

The Case For State Borrowing As A Response To The Current Crisis, David Gamage, Darien Shanske

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The coronavirus pandemic is a national emergency that requires a national response. Asking states to absorb the budgetary losses caused by the pandemic while they are tasked with providing essential frontline services is comparable to asking states during World War II to pay for the landing in Normandy.

This article is a contribution to Project SAFE: State Action in Fiscal Emergencies. We have already argued, more than once , that the federal government should borrow to prevent steep state and local budget cuts. But because the federal government will apparently not take sufficient action, we offer these ideas to states for ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


Kaestner Fails: The Way Forward, Mitchell M. Gans 2020 William & Mary Law School

Kaestner Fails: The Way Forward, Mitchell M. Gans

William & Mary Business Law Review

This past term, the Supreme Court applied the Due Process Clause to prevent the states from closing down a tax strategy that employs out-of-state trusts. Many had hoped that the case would serve as a vehicle for the Court to overrule taxpayer-friendly precedents that make the strategy possible. But it failed. The question that emerges is whether the decision leaves the states with a path to address the strategy and thereby prevent it from being used to exacerbate issues of inequality. After examining the decision, this Article considers the options available to the states and then suggests a way forward.


Front Matter (Letter From The Editor, Masthead, Etc.), 2020 San Jose State University

Front Matter (Letter From The Editor, Masthead, Etc.)

The Contemporary Tax Journal

No abstract provided.


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