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Severe Mental Illness And The Death Penalty: A Menu Of Legislative Options, Richard J. Bonnie 2023 rbonnie@virginia.edu

Severe Mental Illness And The Death Penalty: A Menu Of Legislative Options, Richard J. Bonnie

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

In 2003, the American Bar Association established a Task Force on Mental Disability and the Death Penalty to further specify and implement the Supreme Court’s ruling banning execution of persons with intellectual disability and to consider an analogous ban against imposing the death penalty on defendants with severe mental disorders. The Task Force established formal links with the American Psychological Association, the American Psychiatric Association, and the National Alliance on Mental Illness and the final report was approved by the ABA and the participating organizations in 2005 and 2006. This brief article focuses primarily on diminished responsibility at the time …


Fattening Food: Should Purveyors Of Fast Food Be Required To Warn? A Call For A New Tort, Charles E. Cantu 2023 American Law Institute

Fattening Food: Should Purveyors Of Fast Food Be Required To Warn? A Call For A New Tort, Charles E. Cantu

Journal of Food Law & Policy

Being overweight continues to be an important issue for many Americans. The latest diet fad is likely to include at least one title on the current bestseller list, and newspapers carry daily articles on the most recent study regarding risks related to obesity. Heeding these concerns, the federal government has added its own impetus by requiring the packaged food industry to list, not only nutritional information, but also calories. Individuals alleging injury and seeking recourse have made an attempt to place fault upon purveyors of fast food. To date, American jurisprudence has not helped. The courts have suggested that, from …


Accommodating Disabilities In The Post-Covid-19 Workplace, Barbara Hoffman 2023 Rutgers Law School

Accommodating Disabilities In The Post-Covid-19 Workplace, Barbara Hoffman

Indiana Journal of Law and Social Equality

No abstract provided.


From Healthcare To Hiring: Impacts Of Social And Public Policy On Disabled Veterans In The United States, Benjamin Michael Stoflet 2022 Cleveland State University

From Healthcare To Hiring: Impacts Of Social And Public Policy On Disabled Veterans In The United States, Benjamin Michael Stoflet

Journal of Law and Health

Part I of this paper considers the historical foundations, motivations, and evolution of veterans’ disability and employment legislation in the United States. Utilizing disability and employment as its framework, Part II then defines, describes, and critiques contemporary policies for disabled veterans in the areas of federal employment protections and uses of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) within the VA’s disability decision review process. Part III discusses the roles played by disabled veterans and the federal government in policy reform, finding that both sides act as catalysts and barriers to legislative change. This paper concludes in Part IV, recommending legislation that integrates …


Accommodating Victims With Mental Disabilities, Danielle Shelton 2022 Drake University Law School

Accommodating Victims With Mental Disabilities, Danielle Shelton

Dickinson Law Review (2017-Present)

The #MeToo movement has brought the voices of victims of sexual assault into the public’s eye and, in turn, into the legal system. As its name suggests, the movement’s strength lies in numbers—it is, after all, hard to ignore the collective voices of a group of considerable size and visibility. This Article argues that another group of victims—namely, victims who have mental disabilities— also are desperately in need of their own movement to raise public awareness and bring about reform. However, because of their cognitive and communication impairments, this group of victims is unlikely to effectuate reform itself. Instead, these …


Committed To Commitment: The Problem With Washington State’S Involuntary Treatment Act, Hannah Garland 2022 University of Washington School of Law

Committed To Commitment: The Problem With Washington State’S Involuntary Treatment Act, Hannah Garland

Washington Law Review

Washington State utilizes the Involuntary Treatment Act (ITA) to civilly commit individuals experiencing behavioral health crises. Although civil commitment involves stripping away fundamental rights, it receives less attention than criminal incarceration. The ITA is meant to protect not just the general community, but also the rights of people with behavioral health disorders who utilize the ITA system. Yet, its implementation tells a different story. Individuals in King County are detained and committed repeatedly, without receiving consistent care. Furthermore, the ITA disproportionately impacts unhoused individuals and Black individuals. As the ITA continues to grow both in utilization and expense, other community-based …


A Call To Abolish Determinate-Plus Sentencing In Washington, Rachel Stenberg 2022 University of Washington School of Law

A Call To Abolish Determinate-Plus Sentencing In Washington, Rachel Stenberg

Washington Law Review

For certain incarcerated individuals who commit sex offenses, Washington State’s determinate-plus sentencing structure requires a showing of rehabilitation before release. This highly subjective “releasability” determination occurs after an individual has already served a standard sentence. A review of recent releasability determinations reveals sentences are often extended on arbitrary and inconsistent grounds—especially for individuals who face systemic challenges in prison due to their identity or condition. This Comment shows that the criteria to determine whether individuals are releasable is an incomplete picture of their actual experience in the carceral setting, using the distinct example of incarcerated individuals with mental illness. While …


Brief Of Amici Curiae On Behalf Of Professors In Support Of Petitioner In Perez V. Sturgis Public Schools, Leslie Salzman, Rebekah Diller 2022 Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law

Brief Of Amici Curiae On Behalf Of Professors In Support Of Petitioner In Perez V. Sturgis Public Schools, Leslie Salzman, Rebekah Diller

Amicus Briefs

Amici curiae are professors who research, write, and teach about disability law, special education, civil rights, and administrative law. They are interested in the proper application of the statutes that protect disabled students’ rights and in the scope of exhaustion doctrine. Amici also have an interest in preserving the ability of parties to voluntarily settle disputes, particularly in the context of the legislative schemes here, which encourage cooperation between parties.


The Disability Frame, Karen Tani, Jasmine E. Harris 2022 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

The Disability Frame, Karen Tani, Jasmine E. Harris

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Carey Law

This essay is the Foreword to the 2022 University of Pennsylvania Law Review symposium on “The Disability Frame.” “The disability frame” refers to the characterization of a particular controversy or problem as being “about” disability, which in turn can imply that disability-focused laws ought to resolve or adjudicate the issue. We see this frame function in at least four ways. First, the disability frame is sometimes invoked as a shield, with the hope that it will insulate someone from the reach of the state or exempt a person from an unwelcome or onerous responsibility (e.g., jury service, vaccination, a criminal …


Atkins V. Virginia At Twenty: Still Adaptive Deficits, Still In The Developmental Period, Sheri Lynn Johnson, John H. Blume, Brendan Van Winkle 2022 Cornell Law School

Atkins V. Virginia At Twenty: Still Adaptive Deficits, Still In The Developmental Period, Sheri Lynn Johnson, John H. Blume, Brendan Van Winkle

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

Twenty years ago, in Atkins v. Virginia, the Supreme Court of the United States held that the Eighth Amendment prohibited states from executing persons with intellectual disability. While the Court’s decision is laudable and has saved many of the most vulnerable persons from the executioner, its effect has been undermined by recalcitrant states attempting to exploit language in the opinion permitting states to create procedures to implement the (then) new categorical prohibition. In this article, we examine how some states have adopted procedures which are fundamentally inconsistent with the clinical consensus understanding of the disability and how one state, …


Discrimination And Disparity: Violating Olmstead V. L.C. Discriminates Against The Psychiatrically Vulnerable And Fosters Racial/Ethnic And Socioeconomic Mental Health Disparities, McKenna S. Cloud 2022 Mississippi College School of Law

Discrimination And Disparity: Violating Olmstead V. L.C. Discriminates Against The Psychiatrically Vulnerable And Fosters Racial/Ethnic And Socioeconomic Mental Health Disparities, Mckenna S. Cloud

Mississippi College Law Review

Mississippi is one of several states still in violation of federal laws by unnecessarily institutionalizing individuals with serious mental illness and intellectual and developmental disabilities (“psychiatric vulnerabilities”) and by failing to offer sufficient community-based mental health services. This Comment uses Mississippi’s broken mental healthcare system as a case study to reveal how violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and Olmstead v. L.C. ex rel Zimring, 527 U.S. 581, 597 (1999), not only discriminates against the psychiatrically vulnerable but also fosters racial/ethnic and socioeconomic mental health disparities. Complying with these federal mandates will provide individuals with psychiatric vulnerabilities with …


Jotwell's Thirteenth Birthday Celebration, A. Michael Froomkin 2022 University of Miami School of Law

Jotwell's Thirteenth Birthday Celebration, A. Michael Froomkin

Articles

No abstract provided.


Without Accommodation, Jennifer Bennett Shinall 2022 Vanderbilt University Law School

Without Accommodation, Jennifer Bennett Shinall

Indiana Law Journal

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), workers with disabilities have the legal right to reasonable workplace accommodations provided by employers. Because this legal right is unique to disabled workers, these workers could, in theory, enjoy greater access to the types of accommodations that are desirable to all workers—including the ability to work from home, to work flexible hours, and to take leave. This Article compares access to these accommodations, which have become increasingly desirable during the COVID-19 pandemic, between disabled workers and nondisabled workers. Using 2017–2018 data from the American Time Use Survey’s Leave and Job Flexibilities Module, I …


Collin Walsh ’13 Named A "Careers & The Disabled" Magazine “National Employee Of The Year”, James Owsley Boyd 2022 Maurer School of Law - Indiana University

Collin Walsh ’13 Named A "Careers & The Disabled" Magazine “National Employee Of The Year”, James Owsley Boyd

Keep Up With the Latest News from the Law School (blog)

On the third day of Foreign Service orientation as a U.S. Department of State Diplomatic Security Service special agent candidate, Collin Walsh couldn’t walk.

The 2013 Maurer School of Law alumnus had been experiencing mild symptoms, like skin sensitivity in his legs, over the previous week, but didn’t make anything of it.

In that first week of DSS training, Walsh went from mild symptoms to near complete immobility. Seemingly overnight, the former NCAA All-American middle-distance runner couldn’t move. . .


The Dangers Of Being Disabled In The Time Of Covid, Elizabeth R. Schiltz 2022 University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis

The Dangers Of Being Disabled In The Time Of Covid, Elizabeth R. Schiltz

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Cyborgs And The Americans With Disabilities Act, Lou Colasanti 2022 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Cyborgs And The Americans With Disabilities Act, Lou Colasanti

Student Scholarship

Medical technology is advancing at lightning speed with the potential to drastically benefit the disabled. These new technologies will result in humans who will use a wide array of assistive technologies and will likely be labelled as Cyborgs. Assistive technologies such as self-driving cars, robots, computer chip implants, insertable medical hardware, and exoskeletons are already well developed. The day is rapidly approaching when Cyborgs as a class will be large and influential. Critically, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the judges tasked with enforcing this legislation, and the legislature itself are all ill equipped to handle the speed of this …


Crisis Intervention Team Training And Use Of Force On Persons With Mental Illnesses, Xavier Aguirre 2022 California State University, San Bernardino

Crisis Intervention Team Training And Use Of Force On Persons With Mental Illnesses, Xavier Aguirre

Electronic Theses, Projects, and Dissertations

The criminological literature on the effects of Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) among police in handling of crisis situations involving persons with mental illness (PMI) has emerged as a critical in modern policing. This study seeks to add to the literature on policing persons with mental illness by investigating the effects of CIT training, officer characteristics, and crisis incidences in the Seattle, Washington Police Department. There are two models that is used for this study. The first model focuses on the aforementioned factors in predicting police to use force in such incidents. The second model focus on officer dispositions. The data …


The Missing Piece Of The Puzzle: The Intersection Of Race And Special Education, Tsega Zewdneh Shiferaw 2022 University of the District of Columbia School of Law

The Missing Piece Of The Puzzle: The Intersection Of Race And Special Education, Tsega Zewdneh Shiferaw

University of the District of Columbia Law Review

The privileges allotted to Americans cannot be compared to any other country’s citizens. Americans have the liberty of saying what they want, thinking what they want, and acting freely in public. Nebiyat Shiferaw (“Nebiyat”) is a thirty-year-old African American man who is unable to speak and live independently because he has autism, also known as autism spectrum disorder (“ASD”). Nebiyat does not experience the same liberties as most Americans; he has gone through special education programs and has overcome discrimination, not because of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (“IDEA”), but because of his parents advocating for him. As a …


More Than #Freebritney: Remedying Constitutional Violations In Guardianship For People With Disabilities, Hannah Shotwell 2022 University of New Mexico - School of Law

More Than #Freebritney: Remedying Constitutional Violations In Guardianship For People With Disabilities, Hannah Shotwell

New Mexico Law Review

Adult guardianship is used as a method to restrict the decisionmaking rights of some individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities who have been deemed “incompetent.” However, the use of guardianship to remove someone’s decisionmaking rights violates the equal protection rights granted by the New Mexico Constitution. Discrimination against people with developmental disabilities must be substantially related to an important governmental interest, and the current state of guardianship fails to meet that bar. Further, guardianship violates the state constitutional guarantee of due process because it infringes on the fundamental right to the least restrictive means of care. New Mexico must adopt …


The Distant Ships Of Liberty: Why Criminology Needs To Take Seriously International Human Rights Laws That Apply To Persons With Disabilities, Michael L. Perlin, Alison Lynch, Kelly Frailing, Ashley Juneau 2022 New York Law School

The Distant Ships Of Liberty: Why Criminology Needs To Take Seriously International Human Rights Laws That Apply To Persons With Disabilities, Michael L. Perlin, Alison Lynch, Kelly Frailing, Ashley Juneau

Articles & Chapters

Persons institutionalized in forensic psychiatric facilities have been hidden from the public view for decades – physically, socially, and legally. The forensic population also faces multiple forms of discrimination, both for their criminal history and mental illness. This reality must be radically reconsidered in light of the ratification of the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), the first legally binding instrument devoted to the comprehensive protection of the rights of persons with disabilities. There has been, however, virtually no attention paid by criminologists to the potential impact of this Convention on forensic populations. In this …


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