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Foreign Cyber Interference In Elections, Michael N. Schmitt 2021 University of Reading

Foreign Cyber Interference In Elections, Michael N. Schmitt

International Law Studies

In the 2020 U.S. elections, Russia authorized and conducted influence operations designed to support former President Trump, although it did not attempt to alter any technical aspect of the voting process. Russia was not alone. Iran mounted a multi-pronged covert influence campaign intended to undercut Trump’s reelection prospects, while other foreign actors–like Lebanese Hizballah, Cuba, and Venezuela–also tried to influence the election. Interestingly, China did not conduct operations designed to alter the outcome, although it did consider doing so. The phenomenon of election meddling, however, extends well beyond the United States to such countries as Austria ...


Corporations "Pac" A Punch: Corporate Involvement's Influence In Elections And A Proposal For Public Campaign Financing In Ohio, Taylor Hagen 2021 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Corporations "Pac" A Punch: Corporate Involvement's Influence In Elections And A Proposal For Public Campaign Financing In Ohio, Taylor Hagen

Cleveland State Law Review

In 2010, the United States Supreme Court in a 5-4 decision ruled that limiting corporate spending in elections violates the First Amendment right to free speech. With this decision, the Supreme Court overturned election spending restrictions that dated back more than a century. Before Citizens United v. FEC was decided, the Court had previously held that these restrictions were permissible because there is a governmental interest in preventing election and campaign corruption. Now, corporations may expend unlimited funds for outside election spending, to super PACs, and may even establish their own PACs. Increased corporate involvement in elections has deteriorated American ...


A Defense Of The Electoral College In The Age Of Trump, John Yoo 2021 Pepperdine University

A Defense Of The Electoral College In The Age Of Trump, John Yoo

Pepperdine Law Review

In the aftermath of the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election, where Donald J. Trump lost the popular vote by nearly 3 million votes but still secured victory in the Electoral College, renewed efforts to delegitimize or abolish the Electoral College system have surfaced. Critics, calling for a direct national vote for President, attacked the legitimacy of the election and decried the Constitution’s method of presidential selection as antiquated and undemocratic. Some legal scholars even suggested that the Electoral College must be abolished to disentangle it from America’s racist past and history of slavery. Recently, though, reformers in several ...


Our Campaign Finance Nationalism, Eugene D. Mazo 2021 Pepperdine University

Our Campaign Finance Nationalism, Eugene D. Mazo

Pepperdine Law Review

Campaign finance is the one area of election law that is most difficult to square with federalism. While voting has a strong federalism component—elections are run by the states and our elected officials represent concrete geographical districts—our campaign finance system, which is rooted in the First Amendment, almost entirely sidesteps the boundaries of American federalism. In so doing, our campaign finance system creates a tenuous connection between a lawmaker’s constituents, or the people who elect him, and the contributors who provide the majority of his campaign cash. The recent explosion of outside spending in American elections by ...


The Electoral Count Mess: The Electoral Count Act Of 1887 Is Unconstitutional, And Other Fun Facts (Plus A Few Random Academic Speculations) About Counting Electoral Votes, Jack Beermann, Gary Lawson 2021 Boston Univeristy School of Law

The Electoral Count Mess: The Electoral Count Act Of 1887 Is Unconstitutional, And Other Fun Facts (Plus A Few Random Academic Speculations) About Counting Electoral Votes, Jack Beermann, Gary Lawson

Faculty Scholarship

In this essay, and in light of the controversy that arose in the wake of the 2020 presidential election, we explain the constitutional process for counting electoral votes. In short, every four years, the Twelfth Amendment requires the President of the Senate (usually the Vice President of the United States) to open certificates provided by state presidential electors and count the votes contained therein. The Constitution allows no role for Congress in this process, and thus, the provisions of the Electoral Count Act purporting to grant Congress the power, by concurrent resolution, to reject a state’s electoral votes, is ...


Undefeated - Updates From 2020 Election Exhibit Panel, Sally Brown 2021 West Virginia University

Undefeated - Updates From 2020 Election Exhibit Panel, Sally Brown

Undefeated Exhibit Panels

Undefeated - Updates From 2020 Election poster

A graphic and statistical report on the results of the 2020 election


Regulating The Political Wild West: State Efforts To Disclose Sources Of Online Political Advertising, Victoria Smith Ekstrand, Ashley Fox 2021 UNC Hussman School of Journalism & Media

Regulating The Political Wild West: State Efforts To Disclose Sources Of Online Political Advertising, Victoria Smith Ekstrand, Ashley Fox

Journal of Legislation

The problem of disinformation in online political advertising is growing, with ongoing and potential threats to campaigns coming from both within and outside the United States. Most scholarship in this area has focused on either disclosures and disclaimers under the proposed Honest Ads Act or other fixes aimed at a gridlocked Federal Election Commission (“FEC”). With federal reform at a standstill, states have jumped into the void. Between the 2016 presidential election and early 2020, eight states passed legislation to expressly regulate online political advertising for state candidates and ballot measures, including Maryland, whose state law was declared unconstitutional as ...


The People's Court: On The Intellectual Origins Of American Judicial Power, Ian C. Bartrum 2021 WIlliam S. Boyd School of Law, UNLV

The People's Court: On The Intellectual Origins Of American Judicial Power, Ian C. Bartrum

Dickinson Law Review

This article enters into the modern debate between “consti- tutional departmentalists”—who contend that the executive and legislative branches share constitutional interpretive authority with the courts—and what are sometimes called “judicial supremacists.” After exploring the relevant history of political ideas, I join the modern minority of voices in the latter camp.

This is an intellectual history of two evolving political ideas—popular sovereignty and the separation of powers—which merged in the making of American judicial power, and I argue we can only understand the structural function of judicial review by bringing these ideas together into an integrated whole ...


Don't Change The Subject: How State Election Laws Can Nullify Ballot Questions, Cole Gordner 2021 Penn State Dickinson Law

Don't Change The Subject: How State Election Laws Can Nullify Ballot Questions, Cole Gordner

Dickinson Law Review

Procedural election laws regulate the conduct of state elections and provide for greater transparency and fairness in statewide ballots. These laws ensure that the public votes separately on incongruous bills and protects the electorate from uncertainties contained in omnibus packages. As demonstrated by a slew of recent court cases, however, interest groups that are opposed to the objective of a ballot question are utilizing these election laws with greater frequency either to prevent a state electorate from voting on an initiative or to overturn a ballot question that was already decided in the initiative’s favor. This practice is subverting ...


Voting For History: One Person, One Vote And The Creation Of National Register Historic Districts, Jonathan Stark-Sachs 2021 Candidate for Juris Doctor, Roger Williams University School of Law, 2021

Voting For History: One Person, One Vote And The Creation Of National Register Historic Districts, Jonathan Stark-Sachs

Roger Williams University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2021 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


The Role Of Opposition In A Democracy: A Bibliometric Analysis, Abhinav Shrivastava Mr., RICHA DWIVEDI Ms. 2021 ICFAI Law School, ICFAI University, Himachal Pradesh

The Role Of Opposition In A Democracy: A Bibliometric Analysis, Abhinav Shrivastava Mr., Richa Dwivedi Ms.

Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal)

Globally, democracy is under threat with the prevalence of authoritarian regime all over the world and the role of opposition in a democracy is an under studied subject and has not received adequate importance by researchers all over the world. The present study focuses on the bibliometrics analysis of the role of opposition in democratic system in order to understand the research status of the subject globally using SCOPUS and Web of Science databases.

The analysis shows that research has been undertaken by various organisations and researchers however, the present time demands more attention on the role of opposition so ...


Toward A More Democratic America, Thomas Kleven 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Toward A More Democratic America, Thomas Kleven

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Corporations And The American Polity, Patrick Labossiere 2020 CUNY Bernard M Baruch College

Corporations And The American Polity, Patrick Labossiere

Student Theses

Research on corporate communications’ effects on politics presents an acknowledgement of a relationship between the two topics, leaving a void in the explanation and examination of this topic. The void presents an opening to introduce a conceptual process for how corporations are able to craft communications to influence the American Polity, the democratic social organization within the United States. This research begins with a historical review of how corporations gain prominence in American society, capturing the ability to participate in the democratic social organization of the polity. A qualitative analysis of several conceptual frameworks serves as data, to establish an ...


Third Wheeling In The Two-Party System: How Same-Party Replacement Systems Impede The Replacement Of Independent And Third-Party Legislators, Tyler Yeargain 2020 Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy

Third Wheeling In The Two-Party System: How Same-Party Replacement Systems Impede The Replacement Of Independent And Third-Party Legislators, Tyler Yeargain

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Elections: Elections And Primaries Through The Pandemic, Joseph M. Brickman, Logan D. Kirkes 2020 Georgia State University College of Law

Elections: Elections And Primaries Through The Pandemic, Joseph M. Brickman, Logan D. Kirkes

Georgia State University Law Review

The 2020 election cycle was all but normal. Due to certain health concerns associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, Georgia delayed its primary election three months from March to June and summarily mailed absentee ballot request forms to all active, registered voters. From presidential social media postings to a federal lawsuit, debate ensued over the widespread usage of absentee ballots, their overall effectiveness and security, who would receive request forms, and whether postage requirements qualified as an impermissible poll tax. To further compound these uncertainties, Georgia legislators, who are not permitted to fundraise or campaign during the forty-day legislative session, had ...


Dean's Desk: Iu Maurer Research Focusing On Most Topical Issues Of 2020, Austen L. Parrish 2020 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Dean's Desk: Iu Maurer Research Focusing On Most Topical Issues Of 2020, Austen L. Parrish

Austen Parrish (2014-)

The three major stories of 2020 — the COVID-19 pandemic, the heightened awareness of racial injustice and the election — have made this year one that we will remember. While we couldn’t have envisioned all that would happen at the beginning of the year, our faculty are producing useful and thought-provoking scholarship on all these topics.

I often use my Dean’s Desk columns to celebrate student and alumni achievement, to describe new and innovative programs in our curriculum, or to share how the law school supports and collaborates with community organizations and the courts to provide pro bono legal services ...


Postponing Federal Elections Due To Election Emergencies, Michael T. Morley 2020 Florida State University College of Law

Postponing Federal Elections Due To Election Emergencies, Michael T. Morley

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

Federal Election Day didn’t just happen. Rather, it reflects the culmination of a series of federal laws enacted over the course of nearly seventy years. Each of those laws requires states to hold a different type of federal election on the same day. These statutes also grant states flexibility to hold federal elections at a later date if there is a “failure to elect” on Election Day. Based on a detailed examination of these provisions’ texts, legislative histories, and histories of judicial application, this Article explains that federal Election Day laws empower states to postpone or extend federal elections ...


The Importance Of Transparent Elections, Rebecca Green 2020 William & Mary Law School

The Importance Of Transparent Elections, Rebecca Green

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Itula And Others V Minister Of Urban And Rural Development And Others 2020 (1) Nr 86 (Sc), Dunia P. Zongwe 2020 Walter Sisulu University

Itula And Others V Minister Of Urban And Rural Development And Others 2020 (1) Nr 86 (Sc), Dunia P. Zongwe

SAIPAR Case Review

At the heart of this electoral case lies deep questions about what it means exactly to ‘know’ something and about a few steps that judges should avoid when reasoning from unknowns. In short, the court refused to cancel a presidential election because those who challenged that election in court failed to prove that the absence of verifiable paper trail changed the outcome of the election. If a judge lacks evidence of any claim put forth by the parties, they cannot lean on the absence of evidence to arrive at any conclusion, except to conclude that they do not know whether ...


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