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Book Review: Before Memory Fades... An Autobiography, Amit Kumar 2022 Department of Law, Kurukshetra University

Book Review: Before Memory Fades... An Autobiography, Amit Kumar

Journal of Research Initiatives

Title: Before Memory Fades…. An Autobiography

Author: Fali S. Nariman

Language: English

Year: 2010

Publisher: Hay House India

Total Pages: 454


The Apostrophic Impasse: Diacritical Remarks On The Stories Of International Law, Legal Decolonial Genealogy And Antony Anghie’S Historiography, Britt L.A.Q. (Haadiya) Hendrix 2022 American University in Cairo

The Apostrophic Impasse: Diacritical Remarks On The Stories Of International Law, Legal Decolonial Genealogy And Antony Anghie’S Historiography, Britt L.A.Q. (Haadiya) Hendrix

Theses and Dissertations

The (hi)stories of international law have strengthened the tentacles of coloniality in the legal regime as they continue to taunt the precarious lifeworlds of people, our planet and social imaginaries of an otherwise. The flow of coloniality has similarly rematerialized in decolonial legal theories and the postcolonial historiographical accounts of international law. I intend to demonstrate this colonial revival in the groundbreaking text of Antony Anghie Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Creation of International Law (2005) which challenged the (hi)stories of traditional jurisprudence. The latter was not necessarily a rejection nor negation of Western thought, because I argue that ...


An Exploration Of The Wide-Reaching Effects Of The Repeal Of Roe V. Wade On Women's Access To Abortion, Mitchell J. Foster 2022 Portland State University

An Exploration Of The Wide-Reaching Effects Of The Repeal Of Roe V. Wade On Women's Access To Abortion, Mitchell J. Foster

University Honors Theses

Since 1973, the federal government, through the Supreme Court of the United States, has acted to protect, the rights of women in their ability to choose to have an abortion without excessive governmental restriction. This thesis analyzes how and why access to abortion will shift in the face of the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade (1973), likely to occur this June. This thesis begins with an in-depth description of how and why abortion became illegal, how and why abortion became legal, and how the opposition has developed against legal abortion. Through the last few decades, though especially ...


States May Statutorily Bind Presidential Electors, The Myth Of National Popular Vote, The Reality Of Elector Unit Rule Voting And Old Light On Three-Fifths Of Other Persons, William Josephson 2022 University of Miami Law School

States May Statutorily Bind Presidential Electors, The Myth Of National Popular Vote, The Reality Of Elector Unit Rule Voting And Old Light On Three-Fifths Of Other Persons, William Josephson

University of Miami Law Review

This Article discusses the United States Supreme Court’s July 6, 2020 decision in Chiafalo v. Washington State as it impacts the most in-depth analysis yet published of the proposed National Popular Vote (“NPV”) Interstate Compact. NPV purports to provide for popular vote election of a President of the United States even if the winner of the popular vote did not win the Electoral College. It concludes that NPV cannot accomplish its purported purpose. The article also criticizes a recent article proposing dividing each state’s electors vote in accordance with the popular vote proportions in each such state instead ...


Textualism Today: Scalia’S Legacy And His Lasting Philosophy, Chase Wathen 2022 University of Miami Law School

Textualism Today: Scalia’S Legacy And His Lasting Philosophy, Chase Wathen

University of Miami Law Review

Appointed to the Supreme Court in 1986 by President Reagan, Justice Antonin Scalia redefined the philosophy of textualism. Although methods like the plain meaning rule had been around for over a century, the textualist philosophy of today was not mainstream. While Scalia’s textualism is thought to be a conservative philosophy, Scalia consistently maintained that it was judicial restraint rather than conservatism at the heart of his method. The key tenant of Scalia’s new textualism was an outright rejection of legislative history, which he often brought up in opinions only to mock and dismiss as irrelevant. Starting with the ...


Cafo’S Are A Public Health Crisis:The Creation Of Covid-19, Helena Masiello 2022 University of Miami School of Law

Cafo’S Are A Public Health Crisis:The Creation Of Covid-19, Helena Masiello

University of Miami Law Review

Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (“CAFO’s”) are largely unregulated by State or Federal Laws in the United States. As a result of this lack of oversight, they are a breeding ground for deadly infectious diseases. The COVID-19 epidemic has demonstrated the threat that diseases pose to the United State like H1N1, SARS, and Ebola.
The USDA needs to regulate CAFOs under the mandate given to them by congress in the AHPA to ensure that they are not the epicenter of the next wave of deadly infectious diseases. Scientists have been warning about the disease potential of CAFOs for the last ...


Game Of Thrones: Liberty & Eminent Domain, Mitchell F. Crusto 2022 Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

Game Of Thrones: Liberty & Eminent Domain, Mitchell F. Crusto

University of Miami Law Review

This Article analyzes the relationship between private property and the government’s power to expropriate it. When it comes to protecting private property from governmental expropriation, our Constitution is conflicted. On the one hand, the right to private property is a foundational principle that defines the American spirit, our history, and our culture. Yet, on the other hand, the Founders adopted the government’s superior authority over private property, that is, eminent domain, for public purpose and with just compensation, via the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment. This “private property conundrum” requires us to explore the limits of eminent ...


Expert Testimony By Public University Faculty: Exposing Doctrinal Deficiencies Of Academic Freedom As A Legal Right And Proposing A Solution Within The Public-Employee Speech Doctrine, Clay Calvert 2022 University of Florida

Expert Testimony By Public University Faculty: Exposing Doctrinal Deficiencies Of Academic Freedom As A Legal Right And Proposing A Solution Within The Public-Employee Speech Doctrine, Clay Calvert

University of Miami Law Review

When the University of Florida (“UF”) prohibited three professors in 2021 from serving as expert witnesses in a lawsuit filed against the State of Florida, the decision sparked a national debate about academic freedom and free speech at public universities. The professors also sued UF in federal court in Austin v. University of Florida Board of Trustees alleging a violation of their First Amendment rights. This Article asserts that the constitutional doctrine of academic freedom is sadly deficient for resolving such lawsuits. The Article explains, instead, that the public-employee speech doctrine provides the appropriate framework for analyzing cases filed by ...


Ramos Retroactivity And The False Promise Of Teague V. Lane, Tori Simkovic 2022 University of Miami School of Law

Ramos Retroactivity And The False Promise Of Teague V. Lane, Tori Simkovic

University of Miami Law Review

When the Supreme Court changes course and announces a new rule of constitutional criminal law, the question remains: what happens to those imprisoned by the old practice now deemed unconstitutional? Since 1989, that question has been answered by Teague v. Lane, a restrictive holding that limits retroactivity by prioritizing judicial resources over the constitutional rights of incarcerated people. But should it matter if the old rule has explicitly racist origins?
Convictions by non-unanimous juries emerged in Louisiana and Oregon with the stated intention of rendering Black jurors' votes meaningless. In 2020, the Supreme Court in Ramos v. Louisiana held that ...


Combatting Global Sex Trafficking: The United Nations As A Powerless Entity Or An Untapped Resource?, Kimberly M. Lennox 2022 Penn State Law

Combatting Global Sex Trafficking: The United Nations As A Powerless Entity Or An Untapped Resource?, Kimberly M. Lennox

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

No abstract provided.


Currency Manipulation: The Tale Of Missed Jurisdiction And No Regulation, Thomas J. Crociata 2022 Penn State Law

Currency Manipulation: The Tale Of Missed Jurisdiction And No Regulation, Thomas J. Crociata

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

No abstract provided.


Artificial Intelligence/ Machine Learning-Based Medical Devices: Regulatory And Patentability Challenges, May Lee 2022 Penn State Law

Artificial Intelligence/ Machine Learning-Based Medical Devices: Regulatory And Patentability Challenges, May Lee

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

No abstract provided.


Keep The Local Control, Federalize Teacher Prep: Finland's Model Makes The Case For A Nationalized Teacher Certification Program, Audry E. Thompson 2022 Penn State Law

Keep The Local Control, Federalize Teacher Prep: Finland's Model Makes The Case For A Nationalized Teacher Certification Program, Audry E. Thompson

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

No abstract provided.


China's Foreign Investment Law: Moving Toward Greater Liberalization?, Xianjun Feng, Chuanhui Wang 2022 Penn State Law

China's Foreign Investment Law: Moving Toward Greater Liberalization?, Xianjun Feng, Chuanhui Wang

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

No abstract provided.


The International Law And Politics Of The Trump Administration's Iran Policy, Nedim Hogic 2022 Penn State Law

The International Law And Politics Of The Trump Administration's Iran Policy, Nedim Hogic

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

Abstract: Donald Trump’s promise to lead an “America first” foreign policy captured the attention of both American and international legal scholars. This paper aims to join that debate by examining the international legal challenges of Trump administration’s policy towards Iran. It does so by examining two main approaches of the administration: the exercise of unilateral sanctions towards Iran and the negotiation strategy deployed by Donald Trump personally. In examining the former, the paper relies on doctrinal legal research. In examining the latter behavioral approach to international law and economics, I use a relatively novel approach borrowing insights from ...


The Post-Pandemic Order: A Blueprint For Balancing Health And Ip Interests In The Age Of Covid Variants, Arjun Padmanabhan, Tanner J. Wadsworth 2022 Penn State Law

The Post-Pandemic Order: A Blueprint For Balancing Health And Ip Interests In The Age Of Covid Variants, Arjun Padmanabhan, Tanner J. Wadsworth

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

In December 2021, the World Health Assembly (“WHA”) convened to develop a pandemic response treaty for future pandemics. Unfortunately, as presently envisioned, the resulting pandemic response framework will suffer from many of the same inadequacies that prevented existing frameworks from responding effectively to COVID-19. The threat of new pandemics emerging in the future—and new variants developing in the present—call for a more integrated, robust, comprehensive solution.

This Article lays a blueprint for that solution: a global multilateral Council empowered to (1) investigate developing pandemics; (2) incentivize pharmaceutical companies to rapidly-produce vaccines and share them through voluntary licenses or ...


Legislating Against Liberties: Congress And The Constitution In The Aftermath Of War, Harry Blain 2022 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Legislating Against Liberties: Congress And The Constitution In The Aftermath Of War, Harry Blain

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

How far can a democracy go to protect itself without jeopardizing the liberties upon which democracy depends? This dissertation examines why wartime restrictions on civil liberties outlive their original justifications. Through a comparative historical analysis of five major American wars, it illustrates the decisive role of the U.S. Congress in preserving these restrictions during peacetime. This argument challenges the prevailing consensus in the literature, which identifies wartime executive power as the main threat to postwar freedoms. It also reveals broader narratives of American constitutional development, including the rise and fall of intrusive congressional investigations, the decline of sedition legislation ...


The Post-Pandemic Order: A Blueprint For Balancing Health And Ip Interests In The Age Of Covid Variants, Arjun Padmanabhan, Tanner J. Wadsworth 2022 Texas A&M University School of Law

The Post-Pandemic Order: A Blueprint For Balancing Health And Ip Interests In The Age Of Covid Variants, Arjun Padmanabhan, Tanner J. Wadsworth

Student Scholarship

In December 2021, the World Health Assembly (“WHA”) convened to develop a pandemic response treaty for future pandemics. Unfortunately, as presently envisioned, the resulting pandemic response framework will suffer from many of the same inadequacies that prevented existing frameworks from responding effectively to COVID-19. The threat of new pandemics emerging in the future—and new variants developing in the present—call for a more integrated, robust, comprehensive solution.

This Article lays a blueprint for that solution: a global multilateral Council empowered to(1) investigate developing pandemics; (2) incentivize pharmaceutical companies to rapidly-produce vaccines and share them through voluntary licenses or ...


Slaying The Serpents: Why Alternative Intervention Is Necessary To Protect Those In Mental Health Crisis From The State-Created Danger “Snake Pit”, Kathleen Giunta 2022 Brooklyn Law School

Slaying The Serpents: Why Alternative Intervention Is Necessary To Protect Those In Mental Health Crisis From The State-Created Danger “Snake Pit”, Kathleen Giunta

Journal of Law and Policy

The Black Lives Matter protests in 2020 and ongoing reports of police brutality around the United States sparked extensive debate over qualified immunity and the legal protections that prevent police accountability. Individuals experiencing mental health crises are especially vulnerable to police violence, since police officers lack the requisite skills and knowledge to provide effective crisis support during mental health emergencies. Although the state-created danger doctrine was created by the courts as an exception to qualified immunity, it is so rarely applied that individuals harmed or even killed by police are left without legal remedy. This Note explores qualified immunity and ...


United States V. Donziger: How The Mere Appearance Of Judicial Impropriety Harms Us All, Jackie Kushner 2022 Brooklyn Law School

United States V. Donziger: How The Mere Appearance Of Judicial Impropriety Harms Us All, Jackie Kushner

Journal of Law and Policy

In 2011, environmentalist lawyer Steven Donziger was sued in a retaliatory lawsuit by the oil company Chevron, following his securement of a multibillion-dollar award against the company for its environmental harms in Ecuador. In a case rife with judicial impropriety, Donziger was ultimately charged with criminal contempt of court and his charges were prosecuted by a private attorney. These suits exemplify the growing problem of powerful corporations using legal tactics to retaliate against activists and undermine the legitimacy of the legal system. Federal judges contribute to the problem by misusing the extensive power they hold in distinguishing criminal from civil ...


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