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The Jurisprudence Of The First Woman Judge, Florence Allen: Challenging The Myth Of Women Judging Differently, Tracy A. Thomas 2021 William & Mary Law School

The Jurisprudence Of The First Woman Judge, Florence Allen: Challenging The Myth Of Women Judging Differently, Tracy A. Thomas

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

This Article delves into the life and work of Judge [Florence] Allen to provide insight to the contributions and jurisprudence of the first woman judge. For history questions what difference putting a woman on the bench might have made. Part I explores Allen’s early influences on her intellectual development grounded in her progressive and politically active family, and her close network of female professional friends. Part II discusses her pivotal work with the women’s suffrage movement, working with the national organizations in New York and leading the legal and political efforts in Ohio. This proactive commitment to gender ...


Racial Revisionism, Shaun Ossei-Owusu 2021 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Racial Revisionism, Shaun Ossei-Owusu

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Enigma of Clarence Thomas. by Corey Robin.


One Of The Good Guys: The Making Of A Justice–Reflections On My First 94 Years, Jamal Greene 2021 University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law

One Of The Good Guys: The Making Of A Justice–Reflections On My First 94 Years, Jamal Greene

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


The Virginia Company To Chick-Fil-A: Christian Business In America, 1600–2000, Joseph P. Slaughter 2021 Seattle University School of Law

The Virginia Company To Chick-Fil-A: Christian Business In America, 1600–2000, Joseph P. Slaughter

Seattle University Law Review

The Supreme Court’s 2014 decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. is one of its most controversial in recent history. Burwell’s narrow 5–4 ruling states that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 applies to closely held, for-profit corporations seeking religious exemptions to the Affordable Care Act. As a result, the Burwell decision thrust Hobby Lobby, the national craft chain established by the conservative evangelical Green family of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, onto the national stage. Firms like Hobby Lobby and Chick-fil-A, however, reject the conventional wisdom Justice Ginsburg explained in Burwell and instead embrace an approach ...


The Spirit Is Willing: A Proposal For American Single Malt Whiskey, Raymond Cleaveland 2021 Seattle University School of Law

The Spirit Is Willing: A Proposal For American Single Malt Whiskey, Raymond Cleaveland

Seattle University Law Review

Over the past twenty-five years, small, independent American distilleries have carved out a new niche in the United States liquor market: craft single malt whiskey. Inspired by the success of single malt Scotch and other single malts, American craft distillers are now fighting for their own shelf behind the bar and in the liquor store aisle. In 2018, a cadre of these distillers petitioned the U.S. Treasury Department’s Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau to formally recognize a new category of whiskey in the Code of Federal Regulations: American Single Malt Whiskey. For purposes of consumer protection ...


Duress In Immigration Law, Elizabeth A. Keyes 2021 Seattle University School of Law

Duress In Immigration Law, Elizabeth A. Keyes

Seattle University Law Review

The doctrine of duress is common to other bodies of law, but the application of the duress doctrine is both unclear and highly unstable in immigration law. Outside of immigration law, a person who commits a criminal act out of well-placed fear of terrible consequences is different than a person who willingly commits a crime, but American immigration law does not recognize this difference. The lack of clarity leads to certain absurd results and demands reimagining, redefinition, and an unequivocal statement of the significance of duress in ascertaining culpability. While there are inevitably some difficult lines to be drawn in ...


No, The Firing Squad Is Not Better Than Lethal Injection: A Response To Stephanie Moran’S A Modest Proposal, Michael Conklin 2021 Seattle University School of Law

No, The Firing Squad Is Not Better Than Lethal Injection: A Response To Stephanie Moran’S A Modest Proposal, Michael Conklin

Seattle University Law Review

In the article A Modest Proposal: The Federal Government Should Use Firing Squads to Execute Federal Death Row Inmates, Stephanie Moran argues that the firing squad is the only execution method that meets the requirements of the Eighth Amendment. In order to make her case, Moran unjustifiably overstates the negative aspects of lethal injection while understating the negative aspects of firing squads. The entire piece is predicated upon assumptions that are not only unsupported by the evidence but often directly refuted by the evidence. This Essay critically analyzes Moran’s claims regarding the alleged advantages of the firing squad over ...


Religious Roots Of Corporate Organization, Amanda Porterfield 2021 Seattle University School of Law

Religious Roots Of Corporate Organization, Amanda Porterfield

Seattle University Law Review

Religion and corporate organization have developed side-by-side in Western culture, from antiquity to the present day. This Essay begins with the realignment of religion and secularity in seventeenth-century America, then looks to the religious antecedents of corporate organization in ancient Rome and medieval Europe, and then looks forward to the modern history of corporate organization. This Essay describes the long history behind the entanglement of business and religion in the United States today. It also shows how an understanding of both religion and business can be expanded by looking at the economic aspects of religion and the religious aspects of ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2021 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


Tribute To Professor Doug Rendleman, Katy Barnett, Alison Bell, Jeff Berryman, Neil Birkhoff, Daniel Friedmann, Thomas P. Gallanis, Claire Hagan Eller, Brandon Hasbrouck, Corey Hauser, Brant Hellwig, Margaret Howard, Alexandra L. Klein, Douglas Laycock, Benjamin V. Madison, III, Judith L. Madison, Kyle McNew, Linda Mullenix, Rami Rashmawi, Caprice Roberts, Victoria Shannon Sahani, Joan Shaughnessy, Barry Sullivan, Martha Vazquez, Edilson Vitorelli 2021 Melbourne Law School

Tribute To Professor Doug Rendleman, Katy Barnett, Alison Bell, Jeff Berryman, Neil Birkhoff, Daniel Friedmann, Thomas P. Gallanis, Claire Hagan Eller, Brandon Hasbrouck, Corey Hauser, Brant Hellwig, Margaret Howard, Alexandra L. Klein, Douglas Laycock, Benjamin V. Madison, Iii, Judith L. Madison, Kyle Mcnew, Linda Mullenix, Rami Rashmawi, Caprice Roberts, Victoria Shannon Sahani, Joan Shaughnessy, Barry Sullivan, Martha Vazquez, Edilson Vitorelli

Washington and Lee Law Review

A tribute to Professor Doug Rendleman, who served on the faculty of the Washington and Lee University School of Law from 1988 to 2020. Rendleman became Professor of Law, Emeritus in 2020.


Complicity And Lesser Evils: A Tale Of Two Lawyers, David Luban 2021 Georgetown University Law Center

Complicity And Lesser Evils: A Tale Of Two Lawyers, David Luban

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Government lawyers and other public officials sometimes face an excruciating moral dilemma: to stay on the job or to quit, when the government is one they find morally abhorrent. Staying may make them complicit in evil policies; it also runs the danger of inuring them to wrongdoing, just as their presence on the job helps inure others. At the same time, staying may be their only opportunity to mitigate those policies – to make evils into lesser evils – and to uphold the rule of law when it is under assault. This Article explores that dilemma in a stark form: through the ...


Table Of Contents, 2021 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Table Of Contents

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Charles Reich And The Legal History Of Privacy, Sarah A. Seo 2021 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Charles Reich And The Legal History Of Privacy, Sarah A. Seo

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Completing The Portrait: Concluding Thoughts About Charles Reich, Rodger D. Citron 2021 Touro Law Center

Completing The Portrait: Concluding Thoughts About Charles Reich, Rodger D. Citron

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Aman Relflects On "Page-Turning" Opportunities Throught His Indiana Law Tenure, Kenneth L. Turchi, Alfred Aman 2020 Indiana University School of Law

Aman Relflects On "Page-Turning" Opportunities Throught His Indiana Law Tenure, Kenneth L. Turchi, Alfred Aman

Alfred Aman Jr. (1991-2002)

After nearly 50 years of practicing, teaching, and administration, Alfred C. (Fred) Aman, Jr., took emeritus status at the end of the 2019–2020 academic year. Earlier this fall, he visited with ergo editor Ken Turchi to reflect on his distinguished career.


Justice Sonia Sotomayor: The Court’S Premier Defender Of The Fourth Amendment, David L. Hudson Jr. 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Justice Sonia Sotomayor: The Court’S Premier Defender Of The Fourth Amendment, David L. Hudson Jr.

Seattle University Law Review

This essay posits that Justice Sotomayor is the Court’s chief defender of the Fourth Amendment and the cherished values it protects. She has consistently defended Fourth Amendment freedoms—in majority, concurring, and especially in dissenting opinions. Part I recounts a few of her majority opinions in Fourth Amendment cases. Part II examines her concurring opinion in United States v. Jones. Part III examines several of her dissenting opinions in Fourth Amendment cases. A review of these opinions demonstrates what should be clear to any observer of the Supreme Court: Justice Sotomayor consistently defends Fourth Amendment principles and values.


Court-Packing In 2021: Pathways To Democratic Legitimacy, Richard Mailey 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Court-Packing In 2021: Pathways To Democratic Legitimacy, Richard Mailey

Seattle University Law Review

This Article asks whether the openness to court-packing expressed by a number of Democratic presidential candidates (e.g., Pete Buttigieg) is democratically defensible. More specifically, it asks whether it is possible to break the apparent link between demagogic populism and court-packing, and it examines three possible ways of doing this via Bruce Ackerman’s dualist theory of constitutional moments—a theory which offers the possibility of legitimating problematic pathways to constitutional change on democratic but non-populist grounds. In the end, the Article suggests that an Ackermanian perspective offers just one, extremely limited pathway to democratically legitimate court-packing in 2021: namely ...


Government Tweets, Government Speech: The First Amendment Implications Of Government Trolling, Douglas B. McKechnie 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Government Tweets, Government Speech: The First Amendment Implications Of Government Trolling, Douglas B. Mckechnie

Seattle University Law Review

President Trump has been accused of using @realDonaldTrump to troll his critics. While the President’s tweets are often attributed to his personal views, they raise important Constitutional questions. This article posits that @realDonaldTrump tweets are government speech and, where they troll government critics, they violate the Free Speech Clause. I begin the article with an exploration of President Trump’s use of @realDonaldTrump from his time as a private citizen to President. The article then chronicles the development of the government speech doctrine and the Supreme Court’s factors that differentiate private speech from government speech. I argue that ...


Enough Is As Good As A Feast, Noah C. Chauvin 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Enough Is As Good As A Feast, Noah C. Chauvin

Seattle University Law Review

Ipse Dixit, the podcast on legal scholarship, provides a valuable service to the legal community and particularly to the legal academy. The podcast’s hosts skillfully interview guests about their legal and law-related scholarship, helping those guests communicate their ideas clearly and concisely. In this review essay, I argue that Ipse Dixit has made a major contribution to legal scholarship by demonstrating in its interview episodes that law review articles are neither the only nor the best way of communicating scholarly ideas. This contribution should be considered “scholarship,” because one of the primary goals of scholarship is to communicate new ...


Tribute To Professor Samuel W. Calhoun, Doug Ammar, David Carson, Kelly Faglioni, John Fishwick, Mark Grunewald, Stephen Halpin, Brandon Hasbrouck, Brant Hellwig, Lyman Johnson, Bill Johnston, Rick Kirgis, Brian Murchison, Joan Shaughnessy, Howard Wall 2020 Georgia Justice Project

Tribute To Professor Samuel W. Calhoun, Doug Ammar, David Carson, Kelly Faglioni, John Fishwick, Mark Grunewald, Stephen Halpin, Brandon Hasbrouck, Brant Hellwig, Lyman Johnson, Bill Johnston, Rick Kirgis, Brian Murchison, Joan Shaughnessy, Howard Wall

Washington and Lee Law Review

A tribute to Professor Samuel W. Calhoun, who served on the faculty of the Washington and Lee University School of Law from 1978 to 2020. Calhoun became Professor of Law, Emeritus in 2020.


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