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Marking The Path Post-Cotton: The Supreme Court Reaffirms Dual Taxation In Montana V. Crow Tribe Of Indians, Heather G. Pennington 2021 University of Kentucky

Marking The Path Post-Cotton: The Supreme Court Reaffirms Dual Taxation In Montana V. Crow Tribe Of Indians, Heather G. Pennington

Journal of Natural Resources & Environmental Law

No abstract provided.


Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo Tribal Court Handbook (2021), Tribal Law Journal Staff 2021 University of New Mexico

Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo Tribal Court Handbook (2021), Tribal Law Journal Staff

Tribal Law Journal

This handbook helps take some of the mystery out of practicing in tribal courts. Without the necessary information to learn new rules and protocols many attorneys are understandably reluctant to practice in a new jurisdiction. As a result, tribal courts are underused or misused. This handbook is intended to help attorneys and advocates become more aware of the various individual tribal court systems and to learn their rules and protocol.


Equity Over Equality: Equal Protection And The Indian Child Welfare Act, Lucy Dempsey 2021 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Equity Over Equality: Equal Protection And The Indian Child Welfare Act, Lucy Dempsey

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

In 2018, a Texas District Court shocked the nation by declaring the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) unconstitutional pursuant to the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution. The decision was overturned by the Fifth Circuit but may well be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court. The ICWA provides a framework for the removal and placement of Indian children into foster and adoptive homes in such a way that attempts to reflect the unique values of Indian culture and supports the autonomy of the tribe. In doing so, the law treats Indian children differently than it would White ...


Preview—Yellen V. Confederated Tribes Of The Chehalis Reservation: Whether Alaska Native Corporations Are Eligible For Cares Act Relief Payments, Allison Barnwell 2021 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Preview—Yellen V. Confederated Tribes Of The Chehalis Reservation: Whether Alaska Native Corporations Are Eligible For Cares Act Relief Payments, Allison Barnwell

Public Land & Resources Law Review

The Supreme Court of the United States will hear oral arguments in this matter on Monday, April 19, 2021, telephonically, at 10 a.m. Solicitor General Elizabeth B. Prelogar will likely argue for the United States Department of Treasury. Paul D. Clement will likely appear for the Petitioner Alaska Native Village Corporation Association. Riyaz A. Kanji will likely argue for the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis, and Jeffrey S. Rasmussen will likely appear for the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation.


Preview— Montana And Wyoming V. Washington: The Commerce Clause And The Clean Water Act Collide Over Coal Exports, Rachel L. Wagner 2021 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Preview— Montana And Wyoming V. Washington: The Commerce Clause And The Clean Water Act Collide Over Coal Exports, Rachel L. Wagner

Public Land & Resources Law Review

The Supreme Court of the United States has not scheduled oral arguments for this matter. In October 2020, the Court asked for the federal government’s views on the case but has not yet decided whether it will exercise its jurisdiction over the challenge.


Civil Procedure Update 2021 (Handout And Slide Deck), Verónica Gonzales-Zamora, Julio C. Romero 2021 University of New Mexico - School of Law

Civil Procedure Update 2021 (Handout And Slide Deck), Verónica Gonzales-Zamora, Julio C. Romero

Faculty Scholarship

This presentation aims to 1) review recent amendments to the state and federal rules of civil procedure; 2) help you understand the impact of recent federal and state published opinions interpreting and applying the rules of civil procedure; and 3) assess your understanding of the updates.


The Factual Basis For Indigenous Land Rights, Kent McNeil 2021 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

The Factual Basis For Indigenous Land Rights, Kent Mcneil

Articles & Book Chapters

Groundbreaking judgments in Australia and Canada in the 1990s reveal that Indigenous land rights depend on evidence of Indigenous occupation and law when the British Crown asserted sovereignty. Looking back at earlier Indigenous rights decisions, it is apparent that they were not based on facts, but on prejudicial and erroneous assumptions about Indigenous peoples. In St. Catherine’s Milling (1888), Lord Watson said the rights of the Ojibwe Indians were based solely on the goodwill of the Crown, a conclusion that evidently stemmed from the trial judge’s racist assessment of Ojibwe society. In Cooper v Stuart (1889), Lord Watson ...


Without Doors: Native Nations And The Convention, Mary Sarah Bilder 2021 Boston College Law School

Without Doors: Native Nations And The Convention, Mary Sarah Bilder

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The Constitution’s apparent textual near silence with respect to Native Nations is misleading. As this Article reveals, four representatives of Native Nations visited Philadelphia in the summer of 1787. Their visit ensured that the Constitution secured the general government’s treaty authority with Native Nations and decisively barred state claims of authority. But, the visits also threatened to disrupt Congress’s passage of the Northwest Ordinance and the vision of nationally sanctioned white settlement. In the process of successfully preventing the representatives from reaching Congress, Secretary at War Henry Knox developed the central tenets of what would become the ...


Closing The Circle: Tribal Implementation Of The Superfund Program In The Reservation Environment, Richard A. Du Bey, James M. Grijalva 2021 Stoel Rives Boley Jones & Grey

Closing The Circle: Tribal Implementation Of The Superfund Program In The Reservation Environment, Richard A. Du Bey, James M. Grijalva

Journal of Natural Resources & Environmental Law

No abstract provided.


Anilca Under Attack: Will The Right To Travel Wreak Havoc With Subsistence Rights?, Kathy A. Gudgell 2021 University of Kentucky

Anilca Under Attack: Will The Right To Travel Wreak Havoc With Subsistence Rights?, Kathy A. Gudgell

Journal of Natural Resources & Environmental Law

No abstract provided.


Jurisdiction Over Water Quality On Native American Lands, Charlotte Uram, Mary J. Decker 2021 Landels, Ripley & Diamond

Jurisdiction Over Water Quality On Native American Lands, Charlotte Uram, Mary J. Decker

Journal of Natural Resources & Environmental Law

No abstract provided.


"Te Pee" As In Taxpayer: Tribal Severance Taxes--Canvassing The Reservation-Do Tribes Have The Power To Impose Severance Taxes On Minerals Extracted On Non-Indian Fee Lands Within The Reservation?, Michael Layne Carrico 2021 University of Kentucky

"Te Pee" As In Taxpayer: Tribal Severance Taxes--Canvassing The Reservation-Do Tribes Have The Power To Impose Severance Taxes On Minerals Extracted On Non-Indian Fee Lands Within The Reservation?, Michael Layne Carrico

Journal of Natural Resources & Environmental Law

No abstract provided.


Preview—United States V. Cooley: What Will Happen To The Thinnest Blue Line?, Jo J. Phippin 2021 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Preview—United States V. Cooley: What Will Happen To The Thinnest Blue Line?, Jo J. Phippin

Public Land & Resources Law Review

The Supreme Court of the United States ("Supreme Court") will hear oral arguments in this matter on Tuesday, March 23, 2021. This case presents the narrow issue of whether a tribal police officer has the authority to investigate and detain a non-Indian on a public right-of-way within a reservation for a suspected violation of state or federal law. The lower courts, holding that tribes have no such authority, granted James Cooley’s motion to suppress evidence. The Supreme Court must decide whether the lower courts erred in so deciding. While the issue before the Supreme Court is itself narrow, it ...


“Magic Words” And Original Understanding: An Amplified Clear Statement Rule To Abrogate Tribal Sovereign Immunity, Justin W. Aimonetti 2021 Pepperdine University

“Magic Words” And Original Understanding: An Amplified Clear Statement Rule To Abrogate Tribal Sovereign Immunity, Justin W. Aimonetti

Pepperdine Law Review

The Indian plenary power doctrine—an invention of the late nineteenth-century Supreme Court—grants Congress exclusive authority to legislate with respect to Indian tribes, including the ability to abrogate tribal sovereign immunity. Under current doctrine, Congress must “unequivocally express” its intent to abrogate the sovereign immunity of Indian tribes with “explicit legislation.” Circuit courts tasked with applying this standard have split on the level of textual specificity required to strip tribes of their immunity. Employing the tools of statutory construction, courts are divided over whether the term ‘domestic government,’ as found in Section 106 of the Bankruptcy Code, unequivocally covers ...


Law Library Blog (March 2021): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School of Law 2021 Roger Williams University

Law Library Blog (March 2021): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Indigenous Law And The Common Law, Kent McNeil 2021 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Indigenous Law And The Common Law, Kent Mcneil

Articles & Book Chapters

Indigenous law does not need to be incorporated into Canadian law by treaty, statute, or judicial pronouncement to be part of the domestic law of Canada. Indigenous law exists and is followed in Indigenous communities. It is living law that predated European colonization and has continued up to the present. However, Canadian judges generally are not familiar with it in the way they are with the common law and civil law. Consequently, when relied upon in court evidence of it has to be presented by the testimony of experts, such as Elders and Indigenous knowledge keepers. This is simply a ...


Kū Kia‘I Mauna: Protecting Indigenous Religious Rights, Joshua Rosenberg 2021 University of Washington School of Law

Kū Kia‘I Mauna: Protecting Indigenous Religious Rights, Joshua Rosenberg

Washington Law Review

Courts historically side with private interests at the expense of Indigenous religious rights. Continuing this trend, the Hawai‘i State Supreme Court allowed the Thirty- Meter-Telescope to be built atop Maunakea, a mountain sacred to Native Hawaiians. This decision led to a mass protest that was organized by Native Hawaiian rights advocates and community members. However, notwithstanding the mountain’s religious and cultural significance, Indigenous plaintiffs could not prevent construction of the telescope on Maunakea.

Unlike most First Amendment rights, religious Free Exercise Clause claims are not generally subject to strict constitutional scrutiny. Congress has mandated the application of strict ...


Let Indians Decide: How Restricting Border Passage By Blood Quantum Infringes On Tribal Sovereignty, Rebekah Ross 2021 University of Washington School of Law

Let Indians Decide: How Restricting Border Passage By Blood Quantum Infringes On Tribal Sovereignty, Rebekah Ross

Washington Law Review

American immigration laws have been explicitly racial throughout most of the country’s history. For decades, only White foreign nationals could become naturalized citizens. All racial criteria have since vanished from the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA)—all but one. Section 289 of the INA allows “American Indians born in Canada” to freely cross into the United States if they possess at least 50% blood “of the American Indian race.” Such American Indians cannot be prohibited from entering the United States and can obtain lawful permanent residence status—if they meet the blood quantum requirement. Such racialized immigration controls arbitrarily ...


The Wall That Trumps Environmental Law: A Review Of The Environmental And Legal Implications Of The U.S.-Mexico Border Wall, Olivia Merritt 2021 Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law

The Wall That Trumps Environmental Law: A Review Of The Environmental And Legal Implications Of The U.S.-Mexico Border Wall, Olivia Merritt

Villanova Environmental Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Indigenizing Grand Canyon, Jason Anthony Robison 2021 University of Wyoming College of Law

Indigenizing Grand Canyon, Jason Anthony Robison

Utah Law Review

The magical place commonly called the “Grand Canyon” is Native space. Eleven tribes hold traditional connections to the canyon according to the National Park Service. This Article is about relationships between these tribes and the agency—past, present, and future. Grand Canyon National Park’s 2019 centennial afforded a valuable opportunity to reflect on these relationships and to envision what they might become. A reconception of the relationships has begun in recent decades that evidences a shift across the National Park System as a whole. This reconception should continue. Drawing on the tribal vision for Bears Ears National Monument, this ...


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