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An Exploration Of The Wide-Reaching Effects Of The Repeal Of Roe V. Wade On Women’S Access To Abortion, Mitchell J. Foster 2022 Portland State University

An Exploration Of The Wide-Reaching Effects Of The Repeal Of Roe V. Wade On Women’S Access To Abortion, Mitchell J. Foster

University Honors Theses

Since 1973, the federal government, through the Supreme Court of the United States, has acted to protect, the rights of women in their ability to choose to have an abortion without excessive governmental restriction. This thesis analyzes how and why access to abortion will shift in the face of the Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade (1973), likely to occur this June. This thesis begins with an in-depth description of how and why abortion became illegal, how and why abortion became legal, and how the opposition has developed against legal abortion. Through the last few decades, though especially ...


Alumna Doris Pryor, ’03, Nominated To Seventh Circuit, James Owsley Boyd 2022 Maurer School of Law - Indiana University

Alumna Doris Pryor, ’03, Nominated To Seventh Circuit, James Owsley Boyd

Keep Up With the Latest News from the Law School (blog)

President Joe Biden announced three judicial nominees on May 25, including the Hon. Doris L. Pryor—a 2003 graduate of the Maurer School of Law—to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.


Motion Denied: Procedural Pitfalls Prevail In Motions To Remand, Blair Rotert 2022 Boston College Law School

Motion Denied: Procedural Pitfalls Prevail In Motions To Remand, Blair Rotert

Boston College Law Review

On May 6, 2021, in Shipley v. Helping Hands Therapy, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit held that non-jurisdictional remands must be based on timely motions to remand that assert procedural defects. This holding revisited a split between the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth and Fifth Circuits regarding the proper interpretation of 28 U.S.C. § 1447(c)’s non-jurisdictional remand provision. The Ninth Circuit—much like the Eleventh Circuit but with different reasoning—found that both the raising of the procedural defect and the motion to remand must be timely, whereas the ...


International Courts & Judicial Affairs, Sara Ochs, Haydee Dijkstal, William Dunlap, Kabir Duggal, Joo Marqal Martins, Emily C. Westphalen, Ed Felter 2022 Southern Methodist University

International Courts & Judicial Affairs, Sara Ochs, Haydee Dijkstal, William Dunlap, Kabir Duggal, Joo Marqal Martins, Emily C. Westphalen, Ed Felter

The Year in Review

No abstract provided.


Stuck Between A Fiduciary Rock And A Prudential Hard Place: The Eighth Circuit’S Approach To Erisa’S Duty Of Prudence, Nicholas J. Whitten 2022 Boston College Law School

Stuck Between A Fiduciary Rock And A Prudential Hard Place: The Eighth Circuit’S Approach To Erisa’S Duty Of Prudence, Nicholas J. Whitten

Boston College Law Review

On July 27, 2020, in Allen v. Wells Fargo & Co., the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit held that plaintiffs who bring an imprudence claim under the Employment Retirement Income Security Act against a fiduciary of an employee stock ownership plan (ESOP) alleging that the fiduciary failed to act on negative inside information do not meet their pleading burden. In doing so, the Eighth Circuit agreed with three other federal circuit courts that an imprudence claim predicated on an ESOP fiduciary’s failure to disclose negative information is insufficient to survive a motion to dismiss. Only the ...


All Of The Products, None Of The Liability: Examining The Supreme Court Of Ohio's Decision In Stiner V. Amazon.Com, Inc., Danny O'Connor 2022 University of Cincinnati College of Law

All Of The Products, None Of The Liability: Examining The Supreme Court Of Ohio's Decision In Stiner V. Amazon.Com, Inc., Danny O'Connor

University of Cincinnati Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Covid Silver Lining? How Telework May Be A Reasonable Accommodation After All, Baylee Kalmbach 2022 University of Cincinnati College of Law

A Covid Silver Lining? How Telework May Be A Reasonable Accommodation After All, Baylee Kalmbach

University of Cincinnati Law Review

No abstract provided.


In Defense Of Self And Home: The Problems With Limiting Second Amendment Rights For Young Adults Based On Their Age, Andrew White 2022 University of Cincinnati College of Law

In Defense Of Self And Home: The Problems With Limiting Second Amendment Rights For Young Adults Based On Their Age, Andrew White

University of Cincinnati Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Tipping Point In Ohio: The Primacy Model As A Path To A Consistent Application Of Judicial Federalism, The Honorable Pierre Bergeron 2022 University of Cincinnati College of Law

A Tipping Point In Ohio: The Primacy Model As A Path To A Consistent Application Of Judicial Federalism, The Honorable Pierre Bergeron

University of Cincinnati Law Review

No abstract provided.


Standing For Democracy: Is Democracy A Procedural Right In Vacuo? A Democratic Perspective On Procedural Violations As A Basis For Article Iii Standing, Helen Hershkoff, Stephen Loffredo 2022 New York University School of Law

Standing For Democracy: Is Democracy A Procedural Right In Vacuo? A Democratic Perspective On Procedural Violations As A Basis For Article Iii Standing, Helen Hershkoff, Stephen Loffredo

Buffalo Law Review

Many commentators express concern that democracy in the United States is under threat, whether from the pressure of concentrated wealth and structural racism, government secrecy and authoritarian tendencies, an outdated constitutional structure and old-fashioned corruption, or perhaps a combination of them all. Against this background, this Article argues that the Supreme Court’s treatment of procedural rights for determining standing—the key that opens the door to federal court—is an overlooked factor in contributing to democratic erosion. According to the Court, violation of a congressionally conferred procedural right that does not safeguard some separate, non-procedural, concrete interest of plaintiff ...


Pov: What Rights Could Unravel Next, In Light Of Draft Opinion By Scotus Overturning Roe V. Wade, Robert L. Tsai 2022 Boston University School of Law

Pov: What Rights Could Unravel Next, In Light Of Draft Opinion By Scotus Overturning Roe V. Wade, Robert L. Tsai

Shorter Faculty Works

Beyond what Alito’s draft opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization portends for the future of abortion rights is the striking method of analysis he employs in the reported draft. Despite his many efforts to reassure that the opinion “does not undermine” other constitutional rights “in any way,” it actually outlines a roadmap for the withdrawal of other cherished constitutional rights.


"Sexual Activity": What Qualifies Under 18 U.S.C. § 2422?, Max Doherty 2022 Boston College Law School

"Sexual Activity": What Qualifies Under 18 U.S.C. § 2422?, Max Doherty

Boston College Law Review

On May 13, 2021, in United States v. Dominguez, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit joined a pre-existing circuit split regarding the meaning of “sexual activity” under 18 U.S.C. § 2422 and whether that term requires physical contact between the defendant and the victim. The statute prohibits individuals from coercing or enticing others to participate in illegal sexual activity, including when the victim is a minor. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth and Seventh Circuits previously reached opposite interpretations of the phrase’s meaning. The court in Dominguez agreed with the Fourth ...


Examination Of Eviction Filings In Lancaster County, Nebraska, 2019–2021, Ryan Sullivan 2022 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Examination Of Eviction Filings In Lancaster County, Nebraska, 2019–2021, Ryan Sullivan

College of Law, Faculty Publications

The study examined and analyzed eviction filings and proceedings in Nebraska, with a specific focus on Lancaster County—the home to the State’s capital, Lincoln. The primary objective of this study is to place eviction proceedings under a microscope to gain a better understanding of the volume of evictions in Nebraska, and whether the statutorily mandated processes are being followed. The study also attempts to capture the impact of certain external factors present during the period examined. Such factors include the COVID-19 pandemic and various eviction moratoria in place during 2020 and 2021, as well as the increased availability ...


Using Law Clerks To Improve Efficiency In Jamaican Courts, Sha-Shana Crichton 2022 Howard University School of Law

Using Law Clerks To Improve Efficiency In Jamaican Courts, Sha-Shana Crichton

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Nysrpa V. Bruen And The Future Of The Sensitive Places Doctrine: Rejecting The Ahistorical Government Security Approach, Carina Bentata Gryting, Mark Anthony Frassetto 2022 Everytown for Gun Safety

Nysrpa V. Bruen And The Future Of The Sensitive Places Doctrine: Rejecting The Ahistorical Government Security Approach, Carina Bentata Gryting, Mark Anthony Frassetto

Boston College Law Review

On November 3, 2021, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in New York State Rifle & Pistol Ass’n v. Bruen, a Second Amendment case challenging New York’s concealed carry licensing system. The justices’ questions focused not only on who may obtain a license to carry a firearm in public, but also where those with a license may or may not bring their weapons. These questions acknowledged that the Court’s decision in District of Columbia v. Heller provided a carveout for firearms restrictions in “sensitive places,” providing “schools and government buildings” as just two examples. In the fourteen years ...


“Dueling” Experts And The False Claims Act: Weaponizing Legal Falsity To Combat Hospice Fraud, Kristen Parnigoni 2022 Boston College Law School

“Dueling” Experts And The False Claims Act: Weaponizing Legal Falsity To Combat Hospice Fraud, Kristen Parnigoni

Boston College Law Review

In 2020, in United States ex rel. Druding v. Care Alternatives, the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit advanced a broad interpretation of “falsity” under the federal False Claims Act (FCA) to allow conflicting medical opinions on a patient’s medical prognosis as evidence of false certification for hospice eligibility. In doing so, the court rejected a blanket rule that clinical judgments are immune from legal challenge and dismissed an “objective falsehood” requirement because it inappropriately conflated elements of the statute. The holding has important implications in industries with high risk for fraud, particularly the for-profit hospice ...


Calling Strikes: The Sixth Circuit’S Interpretation Of The Prison Litigation Reform Act, Emily O'Hara 2022 Boston College Law School

Calling Strikes: The Sixth Circuit’S Interpretation Of The Prison Litigation Reform Act, Emily O'Hara

Boston College Law Review

On May 3, 2021, in Simons v. Washington, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit held that a court’s non-binding “strike” recommendation under the Prison Litigation Reform Act (PLRA) did not violate the PLRA or Article III of the United States Constitution. Courts agree that binding strikes are impermissible, but disagree on the underlying reasoning. The Sixth Circuit reasoned that the PLRA, which revokes in forma pauperis filing from indigent prisoner-litigants after three qualifying dismissals, renders binding strikes impermissible before a prisoner accrues three strikes. By resolving the issue using the PLRA, the Sixth Circuit found ...


A Hacker “May” Have Accessed Your Data: Can Victims Of Data Breaches Sue Before Alleging Misuse?, John Landzert 2022 Boston College Law School

A Hacker “May” Have Accessed Your Data: Can Victims Of Data Breaches Sue Before Alleging Misuse?, John Landzert

Boston College Law Review

On February 4, 2021, in Tsao v. Captiva MVP Restaurant Partners, LLC, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit held that the mere existence of a data breach is insufficient to grant plaintiffs standing to sue the company that exposed their personal information. By doing so, the Eleventh Circuit aligned itself with the Second, Third, Fourth, and Eighth Circuits. In contrast, the Sixth, Seventh, Ninth, and D.C. Circuits have granted standing in such cases. This Comment argues that the Eleventh Circuit properly applied Supreme Court jurisprudence at the time it decided Tsao and, in light of ...


Procedural Pitfalls: The Eleventh Circuit Holds That The Sentencing Commission’S Policy Statement On Sentence Reduction Is Binding On Defendant-Filed Motions, Allison Cheney 2022 Boston College Law School

Procedural Pitfalls: The Eleventh Circuit Holds That The Sentencing Commission’S Policy Statement On Sentence Reduction Is Binding On Defendant-Filed Motions, Allison Cheney

Boston College Law Review

On May 7, 2021, in United States v. Bryant, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit held that the U.S. Sentencing Commission’s policy statement in Section 1B1.13 of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines binds defendant-filed motions for compassionate release. In its Application Notes, the policy statement provides four “extraordinary and compelling circumstances” that warrant a sentence reduction. Application Note 1(D) is the “catch-all provision” because it states that judges may grant compassionate release for “other reasons” not specifically listed in the preceding Application Notes. Application Note 1(D) states that the Director of ...


Stare Decisis And Intersystemic Adjudication, Nina Varsava 2022 Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin Law School

Stare Decisis And Intersystemic Adjudication, Nina Varsava

Notre Dame Law Review

Interpreting and following precedent is a complicated business. Various reasonable but conflicting methods of ascertaining the legal effect of precedent exist. Differences between practices of precedent or doctrines of stare decisis are particularly salient between legal systems or jurisdictions. For example, a state’s judges might embrace different stare decisis norms than federal judges. This situation presents a major quandary for intersystemic jurisprudence that has been largely overlooked in the scholarly literature.

Are law-applying judges in the intersystemic context bound by the law-supplying jurisdiction’s methods of interpreting precedent? For example, when the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals adjudicates a ...


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