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A Major Simplification Of The Oecd’S Pillar 1 Proposal, Michael J. Graetz 2021 Columbia Law School

A Major Simplification Of The Oecd’S Pillar 1 Proposal, Michael J. Graetz

Faculty Scholarship

In this report, Graetz suggests major modifications to the OECD’s pillar 1 blueprint proposal to create a new taxing right for multinational digital income and some product sales that would greatly simplify the proposal. The modifications rely on readily available existing financial information and would achieve certainty in the application of pillar 1, while adhering to its fundamental structure and policies.


Why States Should Consider Expanding Sales Taxes To Services, Part 1, Gladriel Shobe, Grace Stephenson Nielsen, Darien Shanske, David Gamage 2020 BYU Law

Why States Should Consider Expanding Sales Taxes To Services, Part 1, Gladriel Shobe, Grace Stephenson Nielsen, Darien Shanske, David Gamage

Articles by Maurer Faculty

States are facing a severe budget crisis as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. And with the federal government unlikely to pass a relief bill to address those state budget issues,1 states will need to play a significant role in making up revenue shortfalls.

This is the first in a three-part series, which is a contribution to Project SAFE: State Action in Fiscal Emergencies. This essay will lay out the general case for why states should consider expanding their sales tax bases to more services as a response to the COVID-19 crisis. The follow-ups will discuss further mechanics and ...


Why States Should Now Consider Expanding Sales Taxes To Services, Part 1, Gladriel Shobe, Grace Stephenson Nielsen, Darien Shanske, David Gamage 2020 BYU Law

Why States Should Now Consider Expanding Sales Taxes To Services, Part 1, Gladriel Shobe, Grace Stephenson Nielsen, Darien Shanske, David Gamage

Articles by Maurer Faculty

States are facing a severe budget crisis as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. And with the federal government unlikely to pass a relief bill to address those state budget issues,1 states will need to play a significant role in making up revenue shortfalls.

This is the first in a three-part series, which is a contribution to Project SAFE: State Action in Fiscal Emergencies. This essay will lay out the general case for why states should consider expanding their sales tax bases to more services as a response to the COVID-19 crisis. The follow-ups will discuss further mechanics and ...


Taxing Local Energy Externalities, Hannah J. Wiseman 2020 Professor of Law; Professor and Wilson Faculty Fellow in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences; Co-funded Faculty—Institutes of Energy and the Environment, the Pennsylvania State University—University Park

Taxing Local Energy Externalities, Hannah J. Wiseman

Notre Dame Law Review

There is a fundamental problem of scale in the governance of industrial development. For some of the fastest-growing U.S. industries, the negative impacts of development fall primarily at the local level, and the benefits tend to accrue more broadly to states and the federal government. These governments accordingly have inadequate incentives to address the very localized negative externalities of development. Yet states also increasingly preempt most local control over some forms of development. This creates a regulatory void, in which state and federal regulations are inadequate, and local governments lack the power to use traditional Pigouvian tools such as ...


Subsidizing Economic Segregation Through The State And Local Tax Deduction, Gladriel Shobe 2020 University of California, Irvine School of Law

Subsidizing Economic Segregation Through The State And Local Tax Deduction, Gladriel Shobe

UC Irvine Law Review

Economic segregation has increased over the past half-century. The trend of rich localities getting richer while poor localities get poorer is particularly concerning because it limits upward mobility and perpetuates intergenerational income inequality. This Article makes the novel argument that the state and local tax deduction subsidizes economic segregation. It arrives at that conclusion by showing that the “local tax deduction” provides a greater subsidy, per capita, for wealthy, economically segregated localities because only those localities have a critical mass of wealthy taxpayers who claim the deduction. This allows wealthy localities, but not poor localities, to provide services at a ...


Information Matters In Tax Enforcement, Leandra Lederman, Joseph C. Dugan 2020 Brigham Young University Law School

Information Matters In Tax Enforcement, Leandra Lederman, Joseph C. Dugan

BYU Law Review

Most scholars recognize both that the government needs information about taxpayers’ transactions to determine whether their reporting is honest, and that third third-party reporting helps the government obtain that information. Given governments’ reliance on tax collections, it would be risky to think that information or third third-party reporting is not needed by tax agencies. However, a recent article by Professor Wei Cui asserts that “modern governments can practice ‘taxation without information.’” Professor Cui’s argument rests on two claims: (1) “giving governments effective access to taxpayer information through third parties does not explain the success of modern tax administration” because ...


Enough Is As Good As A Feast, Noah C. Chauvin 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Enough Is As Good As A Feast, Noah C. Chauvin

Seattle University Law Review

Ipse Dixit, the podcast on legal scholarship, provides a valuable service to the legal community and particularly to the legal academy. The podcast’s hosts skillfully interview guests about their legal and law-related scholarship, helping those guests communicate their ideas clearly and concisely. In this review essay, I argue that Ipse Dixit has made a major contribution to legal scholarship by demonstrating in its interview episodes that law review articles are neither the only nor the best way of communicating scholarly ideas. This contribution should be considered “scholarship,” because one of the primary goals of scholarship is to communicate new ...


The Case For State Borrowing As A Response To The Current Crisis, David Gamage, Darien Shanske 2020 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

The Case For State Borrowing As A Response To The Current Crisis, David Gamage, Darien Shanske

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The coronavirus pandemic is a national emergency that requires a national response. Asking states to absorb the budgetary losses caused by the pandemic while they are tasked with providing essential frontline services is comparable to asking states during World War II to pay for the landing in Normandy.

This article is a contribution to Project SAFE: State Action in Fiscal Emergencies. We have already argued, more than once, that the federal government should borrow to prevent steep state and local budget cuts. But because the federal government will apparently not take sufficient action, we offer these ideas to states for ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


Kaestner Fails: The Way Forward, Mitchell M. Gans 2020 William & Mary Law School

Kaestner Fails: The Way Forward, Mitchell M. Gans

William & Mary Business Law Review

This past term, the Supreme Court applied the Due Process Clause to prevent the states from closing down a tax strategy that employs out-of-state trusts. Many had hoped that the case would serve as a vehicle for the Court to overrule taxpayer-friendly precedents that make the strategy possible. But it failed. The question that emerges is whether the decision leaves the states with a path to address the strategy and thereby prevent it from being used to exacerbate issues of inequality. After examining the decision, this Article considers the options available to the states and then suggests a way forward.


Front Matter (Letter From The Editor, Masthead, Etc.), 2020 San Jose State University

Front Matter (Letter From The Editor, Masthead, Etc.)

The Contemporary Tax Journal

No abstract provided.


Strategic Nonconformity To The Tcja, Part I: Personal Income Taxes, Darien Shanske, Adam Thimmesch, David Gamage 2020 University of California, Davis

Strategic Nonconformity To The Tcja, Part I: Personal Income Taxes, Darien Shanske, Adam Thimmesch, David Gamage

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The dire revenue situation that COVID-19 has created for state and local governments is a well documented and looming reality for state legislatures. We and others have explored a variety of ways that states should respond to this crisis in prior articles as a part of Project SAFE (State Action in Fiscal Emergencies), an academic effort to help states weather the fiscal crisis by providing policy recommendations backed by research. We think, as do many others, that in the absence of sufficient federal action, the states should prioritize raising revenue through targeted taxes on economic actors that are best enduring ...


South Dakota V. Wayfair: An Ill-Conceived Blow To The Free Flow Of Interstate Commerce, Revel Shinn Atkinson 2020 Brooklyn Law School

South Dakota V. Wayfair: An Ill-Conceived Blow To The Free Flow Of Interstate Commerce, Revel Shinn Atkinson

Brooklyn Journal of Corporate, Financial & Commercial Law

For more than a century, brick-and-mortar retailers have been losing local customers—first with the rise of mail-order houses and then more acutely with the rapid growth of online retail. As a result, states have noticed a significant loss in sales tax revenue. While an equivalent amount of tax is typically still owed to the state in the form of a use tax, which is to be remitted to the state by the customer, because these taxes are not automatically collected at the time of the sale, customers have overwhelmingly elected not to pay them. In an effort to recover ...


Conformity And State Income Taxes: Suggestions For The Crisis, David Gamage, Michael A. Livingston 2020 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Conformity And State Income Taxes: Suggestions For The Crisis, David Gamage, Michael A. Livingston

Articles by Maurer Faculty

To guarantee adequate revenue in the postCOVID-19 era, state governments should consider using all possible tools at their disposal. This article explains how and why state governments should evaluate their degree of conformity with federal tax changes in order to achieve this purpose.


Reforming State Corporate Income Taxes Can Yield Billions, Darien Shanske, Reuven S. Avi-Yonah, David Gamage 2020 University of California, Davis

Reforming State Corporate Income Taxes Can Yield Billions, Darien Shanske, Reuven S. Avi-Yonah, David Gamage

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The federal government should be providing states and localities with hundreds of billions of dollars in aid. The arguments against such aid, including the claim that the states have somehow been profligate, do not stand up to scrutiny. Nevertheless, it seems unlikely that the federal government will do enough, and it is already the case that the federal government is acting too slowly. States and local governments, which generally operate under balanced budget constraints, are, accordingly, already making sweeping cuts4 that will deepen the recession and reduce services when they are most needed.

Rather than make these cuts, it would ...


Pub. L. No. 86-272 And The Anti-Commandeering Doctrine: Is This Anachronism Constitutionally Vulnerable After Murphy V. Ncaa?, Matthew A. Melone 2020 Lehigh University

Pub. L. No. 86-272 And The Anti-Commandeering Doctrine: Is This Anachronism Constitutionally Vulnerable After Murphy V. Ncaa?, Matthew A. Melone

Michigan Business & Entrepreneurial Law Review

State taxing authority suffers from little of the structural impediments that the Constitution imposes on the federal government’s taxing power but the states’ power to tax is subject to the restrictions imposed on the exercise of any state action by the Constitution. The most significant obstacles to the states’ assertion of their taxing authority have been the Due Process Clause and the Commerce Clause. The Due Process Clause concerns itself with fairness while the Commerce Clause concerns itself with a functioning national economy. Although the two restrictions have different objectives, for quite some time both restrictions shared one attribute ...


Wayfair Or No Fair: Revisiting Internet Sales Tax Nexus And Consequences In Texas, Jennifer Mendez Lopez 2020 St. Mary's University School of Law

Wayfair Or No Fair: Revisiting Internet Sales Tax Nexus And Consequences In Texas, Jennifer Mendez Lopez

St. Mary's Law Journal

Since 1967, the Supreme Court has revisited the issue of nexus requirements in interstate commerce to keep up with social and technological advancements. However, these restrictive requirements have deprived states of a substantial tax basis. As technology continues to develop exponentially, this presents the need for a new standard that overturns precedent case law. Specifically, the Internet has grown and now necessitates the consideration for and e-commerce taxation collection.

South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc. correctly decided that states have the power to collect taxes from qualifying out-of-state businesses without the need for a physical presence. Wayfair is moving in the ...


States Should Consider Partial Wealth Tax Reforms, David Gamage, Darien Shanske 2020 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

States Should Consider Partial Wealth Tax Reforms, David Gamage, Darien Shanske

Articles by Maurer Faculty

This article is a contribution to Project SAFE (State Action in Fiscal Emergencies). In other essays in this project, we explain steps the federal government should take to help state and local governments cope with their looming budget crises. The federal government is much better positioned to manage these crises than states and localities and, ideally, it would act sufficiently to prevent the need for state and local governments to cut spending or raise taxes. However, we fear that the federal government may fail to act sufficiently, leaving states and localities with the need to make painful spending cuts, raise ...


Qap Out: Why The Federal Government Should Require More From How States Allocate Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, Connor Blancato 2020 Brooklyn Law School

Qap Out: Why The Federal Government Should Require More From How States Allocate Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, Connor Blancato

Journal of Law and Policy

Prohibitively high land acquisition and construction costs block affordable housing developers from using the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit program in high opportunity areas. Policymakers must study the history of housing policy in the United States and realize that the LIHTC program works because it suitably balances previously problematic private-market competition, federalism concerns, and compliance issues. Federal lawmakers can look to Qualified Allocation Plans drafted by individual states as a way to encourage the construction of affordable housing without upsetting this equilibrium. To encourage such development, the federal government can require states, in determining tax credit allocations through QAPs, to give ...


How The Federal Reserve Should Help States And Localities Right Now, Darien Shanske, David Gamage 2020 University of California, Davis

How The Federal Reserve Should Help States And Localities Right Now, Darien Shanske, David Gamage

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The COVID-19 pandemic is a giant catastrophe, but the Federal Reserve can still mitigate the looming fiscal crises facing state and local governments. This article — a contribution to Project SAFE (State Action in Fiscal Emergencies) — builds on our prior background essay explaining state and local budget issues.


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