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3,968 full-text articles. Page 6 of 125.

Front Matter And Table Of Contents, 2020 University of Miami Law School

Front Matter And Table Of Contents

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

No abstract provided.


Masthead, 2020 University of Miami Law School

Masthead

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

No abstract provided.


Little Pink Flower With A Darker Story To Tell: The Role Of Emojis In Online Human Trafficking And Potential Fosta-Sesta Liability, Olivia Parise 2020 University of Miami Law School

Little Pink Flower With A Darker Story To Tell: The Role Of Emojis In Online Human Trafficking And Potential Fosta-Sesta Liability, Olivia Parise

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

There seems to be an emoji for every expression, thought, and feeling – even for human traffickers. Emojis have evolved into a primary lexicon for online human trafficking. This coded language has allowed online human traffickers to evade detection and prosecution. Courts and law enforcement are confused by the seemingly innocent use of emojis in advertisements and conversations that have serious human trafficking implications. Now, the code is cracked. Researchers have studied the intersection of emojis and human trafficking to such an extent that they have caught on to the secret online language of emojis. As the use of emojis for ...


The Price Of Justice: Fines, Fees And The Criminalization Of Poverty In The United States, Lisa Foster 2020 Fines and Fees Justice Center

The Price Of Justice: Fines, Fees And The Criminalization Of Poverty In The United States, Lisa Foster

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

No abstract provided.


Fazaga V. Fbi: Putting The Force Back In The Foreignintelligence Surveillance Act, Christina Ferreiro 2020 University of Miami Law School

Fazaga V. Fbi: Putting The Force Back In The Foreignintelligence Surveillance Act, Christina Ferreiro

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

No abstract provided.


Good For Thee, But Not For Me: How Bisexuals Are Overlooked In Title Vii Sexual Orientation Arguments, Michael Conklin 2020 Angelo State University

Good For Thee, But Not For Me: How Bisexuals Are Overlooked In Title Vii Sexual Orientation Arguments, Michael Conklin

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

No abstract provided.


Black Evangelicals And The Democratic Party: Intersectionality And The Myth Of The Monolithic Black Vote, Meanna Gray 2020 University of California, Berkeley

Black Evangelicals And The Democratic Party: Intersectionality And The Myth Of The Monolithic Black Vote, Meanna Gray

The Macksey Journal

The theory of intersectionality provides a framework to improve visualizing identity as a conglomerate of inseparable, overlapping categories of an individual’s characteristics or identifications. The political implications of this theory serve to modernize oversimplified Black voter profiles with a more nuanced approach. The introduction of President Barack Obama was a critical paradigm shift in the relationship between voters and presidential candidates, especially Black voters. Black-identifying Americans overwhelmingly voted for Barack Obama in both 2008 and 2012, and have voted in large numbers for Democratic candidates in most recent elections. Yet, Black voters are not a monolith. Among other cleavages ...


A Thirteenth Amendment Approach To The Reauthorization Of The Violence Against Women Act, Kylee M. Petritsch 2020 Lebanon Valley College

A Thirteenth Amendment Approach To The Reauthorization Of The Violence Against Women Act, Kylee M. Petritsch

The Macksey Journal

Violence against a woman turns her into a non-autonomous instrument. The use of violence as a threat against a woman leaves her vulnerable, often times forcing her to do something contrary against their will. Women who experience domestic violence continuously experience threatening situations that result in subordination to their domestic partner. The term "involuntary servitude" listed in the Thirteenth Amendment allows the Amendment to be one of the most powerful, yet underused, provisions of the Constitution of the United States. Although the Amendment was created to abolish slavery against African Americans in the early years of the Republic, scholars have ...


Video: No, You Can’T Touch My Hair: The Importance, Necessity, And Controversy Of The Crown Act, Randolph Bracy III, Adjoa B. Asamoah, The Honorable Ashleigh Parker Dunston, Doris "Wendy" Green, linda harrison, Dr. Stephen Wigley, DPM 2020 Thomas R. Kline School of Law

Video: No, You Can’T Touch My Hair: The Importance, Necessity, And Controversy Of The Crown Act, Randolph Bracy Iii, Adjoa B. Asamoah, The Honorable Ashleigh Parker Dunston, Doris "Wendy" Green, Linda Harrison, Dr. Stephen Wigley, Dpm

NSU Law Seminar Series

The Black Law Students Association welcomes you to our Fall 2020 panel event, which focuses on the 2019 CROWN Act. The CROWN Act, which stands for “Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair,” is a law that prohibits race-based hair discrimination, which is the denial of employment and educational opportunities because of hair texture or protective hairstyles including braids, locs, twists or bantu knots.

This panel focuses on the legal perspective from different vantage points. Attendees will learn more about the Act, how it was handled, and the current political climate surrounding the Act. National CROWN Act and ...


Tribalism And Democracy, Seth Davis 2020 William & Mary Law School

Tribalism And Democracy, Seth Davis

William & Mary Law Review

Americans have long talked about “tribalism” as a way of talking about their democracy. In recent years, for example, commentators have pointed to “political tribalism” as what ails American democracy. According to this commentary, tribalism is incompatible with democracy. Some commentators have cited Indian Tribes as evidence to support this incompatibility thesis, and the thesis has surfaced within federal Indian law and policy in various guises up to the present day with disastrous consequences for Indian Tribes. Yet much of the talk about tribalism and democracy—within federal Indian law, and also without it—has had little to do with ...


Equal Protection Under Algorithms: A New Statistical And Legal Framework, Crystal S. Yang, Will Dobbie 2020 Harvard Law School

Equal Protection Under Algorithms: A New Statistical And Legal Framework, Crystal S. Yang, Will Dobbie

Michigan Law Review

In this Article, we provide a new statistical and legal framework to understand the legality and fairness of predictive algorithms under the Equal Protection Clause. We begin by reviewing the main legal concerns regarding the use of protected characteristics such as race and the correlates of protected characteristics such as criminal history. The use of race and nonrace correlates in predictive algorithms generates direct and proxy effects of race, respectively, that can lead to racial disparities that many view as unwarranted and discriminatory. These effects have led to the mainstream legal consensus that the use of race and nonrace correlates ...


"All (Poor) Lives Matter": How Class-Not-Race Logic Reinscribes Race And Class Privilege, Jonathan P. Feingold 2020 Boston University School of Law

"All (Poor) Lives Matter": How Class-Not-Race Logic Reinscribes Race And Class Privilege, Jonathan P. Feingold

Faculty Scholarship

In An Intersectional Critique of Tiers of Scrutiny, Professors Devon Carbado and Kimberlé Crenshaw infuse affirmative action with an overdue dose of intersectionality theory. Their intervention, which highlights the disfavored remedial status of Black women, exposes equality law as an unmarked intersectional project that “privileges the intersectional identities of white antidiscrimination claimants.”

This latent racial privilege rests on two doctrinal pillars. First, single-axis tiers of scrutiny, which force claimants and courts to view discrimination in either/or terms (that is, race-based or gender-based or class-based), contravene intersectionality’s core insight that “people live their lives co-constitutively as ‘both/and,’ rather ...


Pursuing Diversity: From Education To Employment, Amy L. Wax 2020 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Pursuing Diversity: From Education To Employment, Amy L. Wax

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

A central pillar of the Supreme Court’s educational affirmative-action jurisprudence is that the pedagogical benefits of being educated with students from diverse backgrounds are sufficiently “compelling” to justify some degree of race-conscious selection in university admissions.

This essay argues that the blanket permission to advance educational diversity, defensible or not, should not be extended to employment. The purpose of the workplace is not pedagogical. Rather, employees are hired and paid to do a job, deliver a service, produce a product, and complete specified tasks efficiently and effectively. Whether race-conscious practices for the purpose of creating a more diverse workforce ...


Toward Racial Equality: The Most Important Things The Business Community Can Do, Leo E. Strine Jr. 2020 University of Pennsylvania

Toward Racial Equality: The Most Important Things The Business Community Can Do, Leo E. Strine Jr.

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In this address, former Chief Justice Strine kicked-off an important series, the Conference on Racial Equity in Corporate Governance, co-sponsored by the Millstein Center for Global Markets and Corporate Governance, Columbia Law School; the Institute for Law & Economics, University of Pennsylvania; the Rock Center for Corporate Governance, Stanford University; and the Stanford Center for Racial Justice, Stanford Law School.

The address explains the importance of institutional investors and corporations contributing to ending the persistent inequality suffered by black Americans. And it focuses on the reality that we would have made huge strides toward closing the race gap if our corporate governance and political systems ...


Yes We Can Bookmark, 2020 University of North Florida

Yes We Can Bookmark

Textual material from the Rodney Lawrence Hurst, Sr. Papers

Book mark with quote on back and Barak Obama image, signature and slogan for 2008 presidential campaign on the front.


Justice Sonia Sotomayor: The Court’S Premier Defender Of The Fourth Amendment, David L. Hudson Jr. 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Justice Sonia Sotomayor: The Court’S Premier Defender Of The Fourth Amendment, David L. Hudson Jr.

Seattle University Law Review

This essay posits that Justice Sotomayor is the Court’s chief defender of the Fourth Amendment and the cherished values it protects. She has consistently defended Fourth Amendment freedoms—in majority, concurring, and especially in dissenting opinions. Part I recounts a few of her majority opinions in Fourth Amendment cases. Part II examines her concurring opinion in United States v. Jones. Part III examines several of her dissenting opinions in Fourth Amendment cases. A review of these opinions demonstrates what should be clear to any observer of the Supreme Court: Justice Sotomayor consistently defends Fourth Amendment principles and values.


Court-Packing In 2021: Pathways To Democratic Legitimacy, Richard Mailey 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Court-Packing In 2021: Pathways To Democratic Legitimacy, Richard Mailey

Seattle University Law Review

This Article asks whether the openness to court-packing expressed by a number of Democratic presidential candidates (e.g., Pete Buttigieg) is democratically defensible. More specifically, it asks whether it is possible to break the apparent link between demagogic populism and court-packing, and it examines three possible ways of doing this via Bruce Ackerman’s dualist theory of constitutional moments—a theory which offers the possibility of legitimating problematic pathways to constitutional change on democratic but non-populist grounds. In the end, the Article suggests that an Ackermanian perspective offers just one, extremely limited pathway to democratically legitimate court-packing in 2021: namely ...


The Weaponization Of The “Alien Harboring” Statute In A New-Era Of Racial Animus Towards Immigrants, Hannah Hamley 2020 Seattle University School of Law

The Weaponization Of The “Alien Harboring” Statute In A New-Era Of Racial Animus Towards Immigrants, Hannah Hamley

Seattle University Law Review

Federal law 8 U.S.C. § 1324(a)(1)(A)(iii), commonly referred to as the “Alien Harboring” statute, was passed sixty-eight years ago and has been used as a weapon against immigrants and their allies. Spanning back decades, numerous scholars, alarmed by the dangerous use of the statute, have written about its muddled congressional intent and the unclear definition of “harboring.” These issues continue to be relevant and are foundational concerns with the enforcement of the harboring statute. However, in the era of President Donald J. Trump, we are faced with a new danger. We are confronted with an ...


“Don’T Move”: Redefining “Physical Restraint” In Light Of A United States Circuit Court Divide, Julia Knitter 2020 Seattle University School of Law

“Don’T Move”: Redefining “Physical Restraint” In Light Of A United States Circuit Court Divide, Julia Knitter

Seattle University Law Review

To reduce sentencing disparities and clarify the application of the sentencing guide to the physical restraint enhancement for a robbery conviction, this Comment argues that the United States Sentencing Commission (USSC) must amend the USSC Guidelines Manual to provide federal courts with a clearer and more concise definition of physical restraint. Additionally, although there are many state-level sentencing systems throughout the United States, this Comment only focuses on the federal sentencing guidelines for robbery because of the disparate way in which these guidelines are applied from circuit to circuit.


Fall 2020 Race & Justice Task Force Campus Read - Nickel Boys, Golden Gate University School of Law 2020 Golden Gate University School of Law

Fall 2020 Race & Justice Task Force Campus Read - Nickel Boys, Golden Gate University School Of Law

GGU Race and Justice Task Force

GGU Law Race & Justice Campus Read event:

Please join the GGU Race & Justice Task Force as we collectively examine how our lives are impacted by race, racism, and economic inequality by reading and discussing books that help navigate our journey towards justice and equity.


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