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New State Records For The Cicada Parasite Beetle Sandalus Petrophya Knoch (Rhipiceridae), Ed Freese 2019 Valparaiso University

New State Records For The Cicada Parasite Beetle Sandalus Petrophya Knoch (Rhipiceridae), Ed Freese

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Abstract: New state records are presented for Sandalus petrophya specimens from Nebraska and Iowa along with the currently known distribution of this beetle species.


Acroneuria Lycorias (Boreal Stonefly, Plecoptera: Perlidae) Emergence Behaviors Discovered In Pinus Strobus Canopy, Hannah Hoff, Jonathan G. Martin, Patrick J. Liesch, Erik R. Olson 2019 Northland College

Acroneuria Lycorias (Boreal Stonefly, Plecoptera: Perlidae) Emergence Behaviors Discovered In Pinus Strobus Canopy, Hannah Hoff, Jonathan G. Martin, Patrick J. Liesch, Erik R. Olson

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Species of Plecoptera, or stoneflies, are known to use vertical emergence supports, and researchers believe many species of Plecoptera exploit arboreal habitats during emergence. However, the exact nature of these arboreal behaviors has largely remained a mystery. While exploring the habitat potential of Pinus strobus (L.) (Eastern White Pine) canopies in northern Wisconsin we observed Acroneuria lycorias (Newman) (Boreal Stonefly, Plecoptera: Perlidae) exuviae at heights as high as 12m (observations at 6.6, 9, 9.5, and 12m). Most A. lycorias exuviae appeared to have a strong preference for emergence sites at the underside or base of branches similar to ...


A Five-Year Study Of The Flying Beetles (Coleoptera) From A Grassland And An Adjacent Woods In Southern Québec (Canada), Claire Levesque, Gilles-Yvon Levesque 2019 independent researcher

A Five-Year Study Of The Flying Beetles (Coleoptera) From A Grassland And An Adjacent Woods In Southern Québec (Canada), Claire Levesque, Gilles-Yvon Levesque

The Great Lakes Entomologist

During the entire snow-free season (April or May to October) in 2006-2010, we collected with four flight interception traps a total of 34 629 individuals of 848 Coleoptera species belonging to 60 families in southern Québec (Canada). We catched mainly phytophagous and zoophagous beetles. The majority of species (621 or 73,2%) were represented by less than 10 adults over the five years; however, we collected at least 100 adults for 48 species, including four major species: Meligethes nigrescens Stephens (15,9% of the total catches), Longitarsus luridus (Scopoli) (10,6%), Eusphalerum pothos (Mannerheim) (9,1%) and Acidota subcarinata Erichson ...


Use Of Nest And Pollen Resources By Leafcutter Bees, Genus Megachile (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) In Central Michigan, Michael F. Killewald, Logan M. Rowe, Kelsey K. Graham, Thomas J. Wood, Rufus Isaacs 2019 Michigan State University

Use Of Nest And Pollen Resources By Leafcutter Bees, Genus Megachile (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) In Central Michigan, Michael F. Killewald, Logan M. Rowe, Kelsey K. Graham, Thomas J. Wood, Rufus Isaacs

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Many landscapes throughout the Great Lakes region have experienced reductions in floral and nesting resources for bees. Identifying the resources used by bees in the family Megachilidae can be used to inform conservation programs that aim to support this group. In this study, we identified the preferred nesting substrate and size, as well as the proportion of distinct pollen types used for offspring provisioning by Megachile species. A total of 39 completed artificial nesting tubes were collected between July 25 and August 30, 2016. A majority of completed nests were in 4 mm diameter tubes. However, more 6 mm and ...


Historical Population Increases And Related Inciting Factors Of Agrilus Anxius, Agrilus Bilineatus, And Agrilus Granulatus Liragus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) In The Lake States (Michigan, Minnesota, And Wisconsin), Robert A. Haack, Toby Petrice 2019 USDA Forest Service

Historical Population Increases And Related Inciting Factors Of Agrilus Anxius, Agrilus Bilineatus, And Agrilus Granulatus Liragus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) In The Lake States (Michigan, Minnesota, And Wisconsin), Robert A. Haack, Toby Petrice

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Three native species of tree-infesting Agrilus have regularly reached outbreak levels in the Lake States (Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin), including A. anxius Gory (bronze birch borer), A. bilineatus (Weber) (twolined chestnut borer), and A. granulatus liragus Barter & Brown (bronze poplar borer). The main host trees for these Agrilus are species of Betula for A. anxius, Castanea and Quercus for A. bilineatus, and Populus for A. granulatus liragus. Based on 197 annual forest health reports for Michigan (1950–2017, 66 years), Minnesota (1950–2017, 64 years), and Wisconsin (1951–2017, 67 years), A. bilineatus was the most often reported Agrilus species in all three states (mentioned in 90 annual reports), with A. anxius second (71 reports) and A. granulatus liragus third (21 reports). Drought was the most commonly reported inciting factor for outbreaks of all three Agrilus species, with defoliation events ranking second. The top two defoliators reported as inciting outbreaks of each species were, in decreasing order, Fenusa pumila Leach (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae; birch leafminer) tied with Malacosoma disstria Hübner (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae; forest tent caterpillar) for A. anxius; M. disstria and Alsophila pometaria (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae; fall cankerworm) for A. bilineatus; and M. disstria and Choristoneura conflictana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae; large aspen tortrix) for A. granulatus liragus. Other environmental factors occasionally listed as inciting Agrilus outbreaks included late spring frosts, ice storms, and strong wind events.


First Records Of The Adventive Pseudoanthidium Nanum (Mocsáry) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) In Illinois And Minnesota, With Notes On Its Identification And Taxonomy, Zachary M. Portman, Skyler J. Burrows, Terry Griswold, Mike Arduser, Aaron J. Irber, Rebecca K. Tonietto, Daniel P. Cariveau 2019 University of Minnesota

First Records Of The Adventive Pseudoanthidium Nanum (Mocsáry) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) In Illinois And Minnesota, With Notes On Its Identification And Taxonomy, Zachary M. Portman, Skyler J. Burrows, Terry Griswold, Mike Arduser, Aaron J. Irber, Rebecca K. Tonietto, Daniel P. Cariveau

The Great Lakes Entomologist

We report the first records of Pseudoanthidium nanum (Mocsáry) in Illinois and Minnesota in 2016 and 2018, respectively. This represents a relatively rapid expansion since P. nanum was first detected in New Jersey in 2008. In order to help monitor the spread of this bee, we provide information on how to identify P. nanum and provide images of the general habitus, diagnostic features, and male genitalia. Finally, we confirm the taxonomic identity of P. nanum in the United States and highlight potential impacts on native anthidiines.


The Discovery Of Trissolcus Japonicus (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) In Michigan, Benjamin J. M. Jarrett, John Pote, Elijah Talamas, Larry Gut, Marianna Szucs 2019 Michigan State University

The Discovery Of Trissolcus Japonicus (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) In Michigan, Benjamin J. M. Jarrett, John Pote, Elijah Talamas, Larry Gut, Marianna Szucs

The Great Lakes Entomologist

The invasive brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål), is a pest of growing economic importance in the United States, the control of which currently relies on pesticide applications. Biological control could provide sustainable and long-term control but classical biological control agents have not yet been approved. Adventive populations of a potential biological control agents, the Samurai wasp, Trissolcus japonicus (Ashmead), have been found in the United States, first in Maryland in 2014, expanding its range west to Ohio by 2017. Trissolcus japonicus is a highly effective parasitoid of H. halys eggs, but its redistribution and augmentative releases are restricted ...


Epeoloides Pilosulus (Cresson) Rediscovered In Michigan, With Notes On The Distribution And Status Of Its Macropis Hosts., Thomas J. Wood, Michael F. Killewald, Kelsey K. Graham, Jason Gibbs, Rufus Isaacs 2019 Michigan State University

Epeoloides Pilosulus (Cresson) Rediscovered In Michigan, With Notes On The Distribution And Status Of Its Macropis Hosts., Thomas J. Wood, Michael F. Killewald, Kelsey K. Graham, Jason Gibbs, Rufus Isaacs

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Epeoloides pilosulus (Cresson 1878) is one of the rarest bees in North America with only a handful of records since 1960. The last collection in Michigan was made in 1944. Epeoloides pilosulus is a brood parasite of Macropis bees, which until recently had not been collected in Michigan for several decades. Bee surveys in Midland County, Michigan have led to the rediscovery of E. pilosulus in this state – the first record in 74 years. Michigan becomes the fourth state where E. pilosulus has been rediscovered after Connecticut in 2006, New York in 2014 and Maine in 2016, and the sixth ...


Cover Pages, 2019 Valparaiso University

Cover Pages

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Cover pages for TGLE Vol. 52 Nos. 1 & 2


Cover Art, 2019 Valparaiso University

Cover Art

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Cover art for TGLE Vol. 52 Nos. 1 & 2


Tgle Vol. 52 Nos. 1 & 2 Full Issue, 2019 Valparaiso University

Tgle Vol. 52 Nos. 1 & 2 Full Issue

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Full issue for TGLE Vol. 52 Nos. 1 & 2


Physiological Status Of Male And Female Popillia Japonica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Affects Mating And Grouping Behavior, Natasha Tigreros, Rashmi Jadhav, Katelyn A. Kowles, Britto P. Nathan, Paul Switzer 2019 Eastern Illinois University

Physiological Status Of Male And Female Popillia Japonica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Affects Mating And Grouping Behavior, Natasha Tigreros, Rashmi Jadhav, Katelyn A. Kowles, Britto P. Nathan, Paul Switzer

Britto P. Nathan

Because mating may be costly, sexually active males or females are predicted to be in relatively good physiological condition and may preferentially direct their mating behavior toward relatively high-quality mates. We tested this hypothesis in Japanese beetles (Popillia japonica Newman), a pest species in which males and females may be either isolated or in aggregations while feeding on host plants. We examined male size and lipid content and female size and egg load with respect to both their pairing status and whether they were isolated or in aggregations. Males that were paired had the highest lipid levels, and single, isolated ...


Sown And Unsown Floral Resources Both Support Bee Abundance, Pryce Johnson, Kenneth Elgersma, Ai Wen 2019 University of Northern Iowa

Sown And Unsown Floral Resources Both Support Bee Abundance, Pryce Johnson, Kenneth Elgersma, Ai Wen

Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP)

Introduction:
• Decrease in wild bees are linked to loss of prairie and floral resources.1
• The USDA’s Farmers Service Association started a pollinator habitat initiative called CP-42 within the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP).
• Program goals include preservation of wildlife and maintaining native landscapes. • We evaluated success of the program by measuring vegetation density and pollinator habitat quality, along with bee abundance in June and July of 2019.
• We measured bee abundance and compared it to floral resources of planted (sown) species and unplanted (unsown) species.
• This comparison shows if current seed mixes are promoting pollinators better than weeds.


Assessing Cp - 42 Habitat Value For Bees Using The Floral Resource Index, Allison Eagan, Gabrielle Brown, Ai Wen 2019 University of Northern Iowa

Assessing Cp - 42 Habitat Value For Bees Using The Floral Resource Index, Allison Eagan, Gabrielle Brown, Ai Wen

Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP)

Background
--Prairies once dominated 85% of Iowa but that large portion has been reduced drastically to 0.01%. Agriculture expansion is largely to blame for the shocking percent change. [1]
--The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), administered by the US Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency, aims to conserve land, improve water quality, create wildlife habitat, and prevent soil erosion. In 2011, the CP-42 program was launched specifically as a Pollinator Habitat Initiative for forbs and grasses to be planted to increase pollinator habitat. The goals of the CP-42 plantings are for at least nine wildflower species to be found ...


The Mayfly Newsletter, Donna J. Giberson 2019 The Permanent Committee of the International Conferences on Ephemeroptera

The Mayfly Newsletter, Donna J. Giberson

The Mayfly Newsletter

The Mayfly Newsletter is the official newsletter of the Permanent Committee of the International Conferences on Ephemeroptera.


Promoting Bee Communities Through Habitat Enhancements On Public And Private Lands In Nebraska, Kayla A. Mollet 2019 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Promoting Bee Communities Through Habitat Enhancements On Public And Private Lands In Nebraska, Kayla A. Mollet

Dissertations and Student Research in Entomology

Wild and managed bees are the most effective pollinators, accounting for about 80% of the pollination of flowering plants and 75% of fruits, nuts, and vegetables in the United States (USDA, 2019; USFWS, 2019). An estimated 4,000 species of bees reside in North America, the majority of which are wild and unmanaged. Wild bee communities are critical for maintaining healthy ecosystems, as they sustain native flora that provides soil stability and habitat for other wildlife. In a changing landscape, floral enhancements on privately and publicly-owned lands may have great impact for improving habitat for pollinators across the United States ...


Dual Biological Control: Characterization Of Fungi And Bacteria To Control Granary Weevil And Fungal Pathogens Of Stored Grain, Gülçin Ercan 2019 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Dual Biological Control: Characterization Of Fungi And Bacteria To Control Granary Weevil And Fungal Pathogens Of Stored Grain, Gülçin Ercan

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

Cereals are main food sources for humans and animals. However, during storage, cereal grains can be infested by insects and fungi. One of the most important insect storage pests is Sitophilus granarius (L., Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Adults and larvae can cause serious grain losses. In addition to insect pests, fungal pathogens may also invade the grain and cause economic loss, including contamination with mycotoxins, which threaten mammal health by causing serious disease. The most common mycotoxigenic grain fungi are species that belong to the genera Fusarium, Aspergillus and Penicillium. Currently, the most commonly used management strategies for insect and fungal storage ...


Hexapod Herald, August 2019 (Vol 31, No 3), 2019 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Hexapod Herald, August 2019 (Vol 31, No 3)

Hexapod Herald & Other Entomology Department Newsletters

Welcome: Dr. Kyle Koch, Dr. Débora Montezano, Dr. Lise Pingault, Dr. Prince Zogli, Dr. Tobiasz Druciarek, Zuguo Guo, Vilma Montenegro, Sabrina Ongaratto, Emily Reinders, Otávio Silva Xavier, plus Online M.S. students for Fall 2019:

Faculty News: Dr. Jeff Bradshaw, Dr. Louise Lynch-O’Brien, Dr. Matthew Smart, Dr. Ana Vélez, Dr. Judy Wu-Smart

Publications

Congratulations

Student News

Grants

Inaugural 10 week NIFA-funded Beneficial Insects Research and Extension Ex-periences for Undergraduates (REEU) program

Insects and Murder: educational murder mystery game created by graduate student Justine LaViolette.


An Analysis Of Arthropod Interceptions By Aphis-Ppq And Customs And Border Protection In Puerto Rico, David A. Jenkins, Russell F. Mizell, Skip Van Bloem, Stefanie Whitmire, Leyinska Wiscovitch, Crystal Zaleski, Ricardo Goenaga 2019 USDA-ARS Tropical Agriculture Research Station

An Analysis Of Arthropod Interceptions By Aphis-Ppq And Customs And Border Protection In Puerto Rico, David A. Jenkins, Russell F. Mizell, Skip Van Bloem, Stefanie Whitmire, Leyinska Wiscovitch, Crystal Zaleski, Ricardo Goenaga

Skip Van Bloem

USDA Animal Plant Health Inspection Service Plant Protection and Quarantine (APHIS-PPQ) and Customs and Border Protection (CBP) inspect traffic entering the United States for arthropods posing a threat to national agriculture or ecosystems. We analyzed interceptions made by these agencies in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands between October 2006 and December 2009 for patterns with regard to the frequency of interceptions, origins of interceptions, and the taxa intercepted. 6,952 arthropods were intercepted in freight or luggage entering Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands from foreign countries and 9,840 arthropods were intercepted from freight ...


Forest Fragments As Barriers To Fruit Fly Dispersal: Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) Populations In Orchards And Adjacent Forest Fragments In Puerto Rico, David A. Jenkins, Paul E. Kendra, Skip Van Bloem, Stefanie Whitmire, Russ Mizell III, Ricardo Goenaga 2019 USDA-ARS Tropical Agriculture Research Station

Forest Fragments As Barriers To Fruit Fly Dispersal: Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) Populations In Orchards And Adjacent Forest Fragments In Puerto Rico, David A. Jenkins, Paul E. Kendra, Skip Van Bloem, Stefanie Whitmire, Russ Mizell Iii, Ricardo Goenaga

Skip Van Bloem

McPhail-type traps baited with ammonium acetate and putrescine were used to monitor populations of Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart) and Anastrepha suspensa(Loew) in two orchards with hosts of these flies (mango, Mangifera indica L., and carambola, Averrhoa carambola L.), as well as in forest fragments bordering these orchards. Contour maps were constructed to measure population distributions in and around orchards. Our results indicate that Anastrephapopulations are focused around host fruit in both space and time, that traps do not draw fruit flies away from hosts, even when placed within 15 m of the host, and that lures continue to function ...


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