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The Manuscript Works Of S. Fred Prince (1857-1951), Sarah Burke Cahalan, Jason W. Dean 2018 University of Dayton

The Manuscript Works Of S. Fred Prince (1857-1951), Sarah Burke Cahalan, Jason W. Dean

Marian Library/IMRI Faculty Publications

S. Fred Prince, a botanical illustrator and amateur scientist, is a largely unknown artist whose work on the American landscape demonstrates his eligibility to be considered in the lineage of self-taught illustrator-naturalists such as Mark Catesby and Genevieve Jones. In this article, we present a survey of extant Prince materials identified at time of writing, describing their contents and physical characteristics. Beyond this survey and description, we also provide a biographical sketch and timeline of Prince's life.


Characterization Of A Novel Mitochondrial Plasmid In Brassica, Mackenzie Strehle 2017 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Characterization Of A Novel Mitochondrial Plasmid In Brassica, Mackenzie Strehle

UCARE Research Products

Possessing some of the largest and most complex genomes of any eukaryotic organelles, plant mitochondria are notorious for their rapidly rearranging genetic framework. In addition to containing a large and complex mitochondrial genome, the mitochondria of several plants in the genus Brassica have also been shown to contain an independent, self-replicating linear plasmid. Interestingly, the plasmid appears to be able to move independently between the cytoplasm and the mitochondria, and it can be paternally inherited, unlike the rest of the mitochondrial genome. The plasmid also has features similar to those of adenoviruses, including terminal inverted repeats and covalently bound proteins ...


Tracking 19th Century Late Blight From Archival Documents Using Text Analytics And Geoparsing, Laura Tateosian, Rachael Guenter, Yi-Peng Yang, Jean Ristaino 2017 NC State University Center For Geospatial Analytics

Tracking 19th Century Late Blight From Archival Documents Using Text Analytics And Geoparsing, Laura Tateosian, Rachael Guenter, Yi-Peng Yang, Jean Ristaino

Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial (FOSS4G) Conference Proceedings

In 1845, Ireland's potato crop was struck by a devastating potato disease that killed Ireland’s crop caused devastation for seven years and led to mass starvation and emigration from the country. The cause of the potato destruction was a fungus-like plant pathogen. There are several theories about the origin of the disease and the source of the 19th century outbreaks. We use historical documents contemporary to that time to investigate spatial information that might inform these mysteries. We present methodologies for automatically extracting information from these voluminous data sources. We identify and map geographic locations that are proximate ...


Managing Nitrous Oxide Emissions In Agricultural Fields, Mark S. Coyne, Wei Ren 2017 University of Kentucky

Managing Nitrous Oxide Emissions In Agricultural Fields, Mark S. Coyne, Wei Ren

Mark S. Coyne

Agriculture is a major contributor to atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) (Smith et al., 2014; Tian et al., 2015). Unfortunately, nitrous oxide destroys stratospheric ozone (O3) which protects us from ultraviolet radiation (Cicerone, 1989) and it increases ground level O3, whichis an air pollutant threatening human health and food production. Nitrous oxide is also 298 times more potent than an equivalent amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in terms of trapping and absorbing reflected solar radiation (Forster et al., 2007). Basic chemistry and physics assure us that increased levels of N2O in the atmosphere are ...


Potential For Sorghum Genotypes In A Double-Cropping System, Ben Michael Goff, Kenneth J. Moore, Steven L. Fales, Emily A. Heaton 2017 Iowa State University

Potential For Sorghum Genotypes In A Double-Cropping System, Ben Michael Goff, Kenneth J. Moore, Steven L. Fales, Emily A. Heaton

Emily Heaton

The majority of the ethanol currently produced in the United States is derived from the hydrolysis and fermentation of starch provided from corn (Zea mays) grain. Although this is a suitable temporary solution, there are some long-term issues associated with continued use of corn grain as an ethanol feedstock. It has been estimated that if the entire U.S. corn crop was used for ethanol production, it would only meet approximately 15 to 25% of the U.S. transportation fuel need. Thus ethanol produced from biomass is expected to help meet the energy needs that grain ethanol may not provide.


New Isu Research May Help Farmers Make More Informed Decisions About Land Use, Elke Brandes, Emily A. Heaton, Lisa A. Schulte-Moore, Fred Love 2017 Iowa State University

New Isu Research May Help Farmers Make More Informed Decisions About Land Use, Elke Brandes, Emily A. Heaton, Lisa A. Schulte-Moore, Fred Love

Emily Heaton

A new study from a multidisciplinary team led by Iowa State University agronomists shows that significant portions of Iowa farmland consistently lose money and could influence many farmers to change how they use some of the acres they devote to corn and soybeans.


Miscanthus Establishment And Survival, Nicholas N. Boersma, Emily A. Heaton 2017 Iowa State University

Miscanthus Establishment And Survival, Nicholas N. Boersma, Emily A. Heaton

Emily Heaton

Rising costs of petroleum fuels and increased awareness of the adverse effects of greenhouse gases have spurred interest in renewable fuels and other ‘green’ products. Recent legislation has set goals of approximately 20 billion gallons of renewable fuel produced from non-corn starch sources by the year 2022. These driving forces have increased interest in dedicated bioenergy crops. Among perennial grasses, which have received an exceptional amount of attention as dedicated energy crops, one stands out: Miscanthus (Miscanthus × giganteus).


Miscanthus Establishment And Survival, Nicholas N. Boersma, Emily A. Heaton 2017 Iowa State University

Miscanthus Establishment And Survival, Nicholas N. Boersma, Emily A. Heaton

Emily Heaton

Rising costs of petroleum fuels and increased awareness of the adverse effects of greenhouse gases have spurred interest in renewable fuels and other ‘green’ products. Recent legislation has set goals of approximately 20 billion gallons of renewable fuel produced from non-corn starch sources by the year 2022. These driving forces have increased interest in dedicated bioenergy crops. Among perennial grasses, which have received an exceptional amount of attention as dedicated energy crops, one stands out: Miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus).


Is It Too Late To Dig Miscanthus For Spring Planting?, Emily A. Heaton, Nicholas N. Boersma 2017 Iowa State University

Is It Too Late To Dig Miscanthus For Spring Planting?, Emily A. Heaton, Nicholas N. Boersma

Emily Heaton

Giant Miscanthus (Miscanthus × giganteus) is a perennial warm-season grass used for bioenergy, and is being planted on thousands of acres in Missouri and Arkansas this spring. Given the warm spring, and the high level of interest in Miscanthus this year, we have been getting lots of questions around propagation and planting.


Farm-Scale Costs And Returns For Second Generation Bioenergy Cropping Systems In The Us Corn Belt, Robert K. Manatt, Arne Hallam, Lisa A. Schulte, Emily A. Heaton, Theodore P. Gunther, Richard B. Hall, Kenneth J. Moore 2017 Iowa State University

Farm-Scale Costs And Returns For Second Generation Bioenergy Cropping Systems In The Us Corn Belt, Robert K. Manatt, Arne Hallam, Lisa A. Schulte, Emily A. Heaton, Theodore P. Gunther, Richard B. Hall, Kenneth J. Moore

Emily Heaton

While grain crops are meeting much of the initial need for biofuels in the US, cellulosic or second generation (2G) materials are mandated to provide a growing portion of biofuel feedstocks. We sought to inform development of a 2G crop portfolio by assessing the profitability of novel cropping systems that potentially mitigate the negative effects of grain-based biofuel crops on food supply and environmental quality. We analyzed farm-gate costs and returns of five systems from an ongoing experiment in central Iowa, USA. The continuous corn cropping system was most profitable under current market conditions, followed by a corn–soybean rotation ...


Seeds From Fresh Conventional Tomatoes Germinate Faster Than Dried Or Organic Seeds, Christopher G. Brown 7131483, Cameron Kilpatrick, Mary Vu, Mallory Weaver 2017 Georgia Gwinnett College

Seeds From Fresh Conventional Tomatoes Germinate Faster Than Dried Or Organic Seeds, Christopher G. Brown 7131483, Cameron Kilpatrick, Mary Vu, Mallory Weaver

Georgia Journal of Science

Conventionally-grown and organically-grown tomato seeds sourced from both fresh tomatoes and store-bought packages were germinated for seven days to evaluate the effect of seed source on germination rates. Seeds from fresh Roma tomatoes were prepared by allowing them to ferment in their own pulp for 24 hours, while commercially packaged dry seeds did not require any preparation. Once prepared, the seeds were spaced evenly on wet paper towels and stored in resealable plastic bags in groups of 10 for a total sample size of 100 seeds in each of four treatments. The number of germinated seeds and the length of ...


Economies Of Scale In Integrated Pest Management In Vegetable And Fruit Production, Franklin Quarcoo, Conrad Bonsi, David Nii O. Tackie, Walter A. Hill, Gertrude Wall, George Hunter 2017 Tuskegee University

Economies Of Scale In Integrated Pest Management In Vegetable And Fruit Production, Franklin Quarcoo, Conrad Bonsi, David Nii O. Tackie, Walter A. Hill, Gertrude Wall, George Hunter

Professional Agricultural Workers Journal

Abstract

Pest management is achieved directly using a variety of tools, including pesticides, and indirectly through a number of agronomic/cultural practices such as irrigation and fertilizer application; collectively these practices function to positively effect general plant health. Healthier plants are more resistant to or tolerant of pests. This study explores the scale differences that impact the pest management significance and suitability of certain agronomic practices. Scale differences were discussed using literature-based information, direct field observations, and anecdotal information on the relative advantages of drip and sprinkler irrigation systems; organic and conventional cultivation of crops; crop rotation versus mono-cropping systems ...


Managing Nitrous Oxide Emissions In Agricultural Fields, Mark S. Coyne, Wei Ren 2017 University of Kentucky

Managing Nitrous Oxide Emissions In Agricultural Fields, Mark S. Coyne, Wei Ren

Plant and Soil Sciences Research Report

Agriculture is a major contributor to atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) (Smith et al., 2014; Tian et al., 2015). Unfortunately, nitrous oxide destroys stratospheric ozone (O3) which protects us from ultraviolet radiation (Cicerone, 1989) and it increases ground level O3, whichis an air pollutant threatening human health and food production. Nitrous oxide is also 298 times more potent than an equivalent amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in terms of trapping and absorbing reflected solar radiation (Forster et al., 2007). Basic chemistry and physics assure us that increased levels of N2O in the atmosphere are ...


Identity Behind Glass: The Second Gore Place Greenhouse, Sean P. Romo 2017 University of Massachusetts Boston

Identity Behind Glass: The Second Gore Place Greenhouse, Sean P. Romo

Graduate Masters Theses

This thesis examines the second greenhouse at Gore Place, a historic country estate in Waltham, Massachusetts. Gore Place was owned by and named for Christopher and Rebecca Gore, members of the 18th- and 19th-century political and economic elite in New England. The greenhouse was constructed in 1806, and excavation at the site took place in 2004, 2008, and 2012. The latter two projects were data recovery excavations, which exposed portions of the greenhouse’s foundations and interior, as well as several features in the yard surrounding the building. Historic greenhouses were prestigious structures, financially accessible only to institutions, governments, and ...


1938 Iowa Corn Yield Test, Marcus S. Zuber, Joe L. Robinson 2017 U.S.D.A.

1938 Iowa Corn Yield Test, Marcus S. Zuber, Joe L. Robinson

Bulletin (Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station)

A total of 1,110 district entries was made in the 12 fields of the 1938 Iowa Corn Yield Test. These were divided into three groups on the basis of the indicated seed grown by the entrant in 1937; Regular Open-Pollinated, Regular Hybrids, and Experimental Hybrids.


Marketing Iowa Cantaloupes, A. T. Erwin, Geoffrey Shepherd, N. D. Morgan 2017 Iowa State College

Marketing Iowa Cantaloupes, A. T. Erwin, Geoffrey Shepherd, N. D. Morgan

Bulletin (Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station)

Cantaloupe production is well adapted to the sand land areas. This type of soil, though not well adapted to corn and general farm crops, may be advantageously devoted to cantaloupe growing.

Cantaloupe marketing in Iowa presents a number of interesting and complex problems. These include consideration of varietal adaptation, the temperature factor, changes in transporting and selling agencies and competing areas of production. The objective of this bulletin is to show clearly what these problems are and to suggest possible methods of meeting them.


The 1937 Iowa Corn Yield Test, Joe L. Robinson, R. C. Eckhardt, M. M. Rhoades, M. S. Zuber 2017 Iowa State College

The 1937 Iowa Corn Yield Test, Joe L. Robinson, R. C. Eckhardt, M. M. Rhoades, M. S. Zuber

Bulletin (Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station)

The purpose of the Iowa Corn Yield Test is to find for each district and section of the state those strains of open-pollinated corn and hybrid combinations which produce the greatest yield, mature properly, possess resistance to lodging and have good quality or possess other characteristics which might make them desirable. Significant differences in these characteristics between different kinds of corn grown in adequately replicated tests may be attributed to differences inherent in the strains.


Barley In Iowa, L. C. Burnett, Chas. S. Reddy 2017 Iowa State College

Barley In Iowa, L. C. Burnett, Chas. S. Reddy

Bulletin (Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station)

Barley yields in Iowa are higher than those for oats, but in spite of this 15 times more acres are sown to oats than to barley. During the 10 year period, 1925-34, the farms of Iowa produced average acre yields of 1,007 pounds of oats on 6,000,000 acres and 1,238 pounds of barley on 460,000 acres. Figure 1, presenting data from the Iowa Year Book of Agriculture, shows the relative acreage and acre yields of the two crops from 1900 to 1934. In order that a direct comparison may readily be made, the yields of ...


Hybrid Corn In Iowa, A. A. Bryan, R. W. Jugenheimer 2017 Iowa State College

Hybrid Corn In Iowa, A. A. Bryan, R. W. Jugenheimer

Bulletin (Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station)

Hybrid corn is a comparatively recent development. Extensive breeding programs for the development of corn hybrids date from only about 1920—the Iowa program was begun in 1922. Despite the newness of hybrid corn, yield comparisons in the Iowa Corn Yield Test during the past 10 years have adequately demonstrated the superiority of certain hybrids over the best open-pollinated varieties. Results of these and other comparisons have awakened among growers a keen interest in the possibilities of hybrid corn.

Every grower is interested in obtaining large acre yields. The net profit from growing a bushel of corn is the difference ...


Notes On Some Of The Newer Vegetables, A. T. Erwin, E. S. Haber 2017 Iowa State College

Notes On Some Of The Newer Vegetables, A. T. Erwin, E. S. Haber

Bulletin (Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station)

In presenting the following report on some of the newer vegetables recently tested at the Iowa Agricultural Experiment Station, no attempt is made to embrace all the new varieties or possible synonyms offered in the American seed trade. In cases where the results were so distinctly negative as to indicate that the variety was unsuited to the soil and climatic condition of central Iowa, it was omitted from the list.

The fact that a variety may be of special value for one purpose, but possibly inferior for another, should be borne in mind. The Ohio Canner beet is admirably adapted ...


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