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Control Policies And Sensitivity Analysis In A Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Model: A Case Study In Cusco Region, Peru., Rocio M. Caja-Rivera, Ignacio Barradas 2017 CIMAT

Control Policies And Sensitivity Analysis In A Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Model: A Case Study In Cusco Region, Peru., Rocio M. Caja-Rivera, Ignacio Barradas

Biology and Medicine Through Mathematics Conference

No abstract provided.


Ixodes Brunneus (Acari: Ixodidae) From Two Bird Hosts: A New Michigan Tick, Richard S. Keith, Brenda S. Keith, William C. Scharf, Sarah A. Hamer 2017 Kalamazoo Valley Bird Observatory, Kalamazoo Nature Center

Ixodes Brunneus (Acari: Ixodidae) From Two Bird Hosts: A New Michigan Tick, Richard S. Keith, Brenda S. Keith, William C. Scharf, Sarah A. Hamer

The Great Lakes Entomologist

The tick Ixodes brunneus Koch (Acari: Ixodidae) is reported for the first time in Michigan from two bird hosts at two locations in the lower peninsula. All stages of this tick exclusively feed on birds, and are primarily known from the southern U.S., although abundant records occur from northern states. The role of this species as a vector of pathogens is discussed.


First Report Of Leptomantispa Pulchella (Banks, 1912) (Neuroptera: Mantispidae) From Iowa, Edwin L. Freese, Paul K. Lago 2017 University of Mississippi

First Report Of Leptomantispa Pulchella (Banks, 1912) (Neuroptera: Mantispidae) From Iowa, Edwin L. Freese, Paul K. Lago

The Great Lakes Entomologist

An adult specimen of Leptomantispa pulchella (Banks) (Neuroptera: Mantispidae) was collected in southeast Iowa. Published records indicate the species is present in southwestern Canada and much of Central America, but this is the first published report of this species from Iowa.


Feeding Records Of True Bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) From Wisconsin, Supplement, Andrew H. Williams 2017 Valparaiso University

Feeding Records Of True Bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) From Wisconsin, Supplement, Andrew H. Williams

The Great Lakes Entomologist

In order to understand any animal and its habitat requirements, we must know what it eats. Reported here are observations of feeding by 27 species of true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) encountered in various habitats in Wisconsin over the years 2003–2014. This is the first report of Anasa repetita Heidemann (Coreidae) from Wisconsin.


Macromia Alleghaniensis (Odonata: Macromiidae): New For Michigan, With Clarifications Of Northern Records, Julie A. Craves, Darrin S. O’Brien 2017 University of Michigan, Dearborn

Macromia Alleghaniensis (Odonata: Macromiidae): New For Michigan, With Clarifications Of Northern Records, Julie A. Craves, Darrin S. O’Brien

The Great Lakes Entomologist

An Alleghany River Cruiser, Macromia alleghaniensis Williamson (Odonata: Macromiidae), collected in Cass County, Michigan on 18 June 2014, represents the first record of the species for the state, as well as the northernmost unequivocal record in North America. Other records north of 40° latitude are clarified and discussed.


Occurrence Of Treehopper (Hemiptera: Membracidae) Bycatch On Purple Panel Traps And Lindgren Funnel Traps In Pennsylvania, With New State Records, Lawrence Barringer 2017 Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

Occurrence Of Treehopper (Hemiptera: Membracidae) Bycatch On Purple Panel Traps And Lindgren Funnel Traps In Pennsylvania, With New State Records, Lawrence Barringer

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Surveys for invasive insects in Pennsylvania conducted from 2009-2013 captured large numbers of native treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae). These were collected using Lindgren funnel traps and purple prism traps totaling 1,434 specimens in eight tribes, 20 genera, and 57 species. As a result of this work Pennsylvania now has four new published species records: Heliria gibberata Ball 1925, Palonica pyramidata (Uhler 1877), Telamona projecta Butler 1877, and Telamona westcotti Goding 1893. With proper site selection Lindgren funnel traps may be able to capture ten to hundreds of treehoppers in a single season, especially within the Smiliinae: Smiliini and Telamonini.


Infrared Lighting Does Not Suppress Catch Of Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) In Pheromone-Baited Monitoring Traps, C. G. Adams, P. S. McGhee, J. R. Miller 2017 Michigan State University

Infrared Lighting Does Not Suppress Catch Of Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) In Pheromone-Baited Monitoring Traps, C. G. Adams, P. S. Mcghee, J. R. Miller

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Video cameras are increasingly being used to record insect behaviors in the field over prolonged intervals. A nagging question about crepuscular and nocturnal recordings is whether or not infrared light emitted by such cameras to illuminate the scene influences the behaviors of the subjects or study outcomes. Here we quantified catches of male codling moths, Cydia pomonella (L.), responding to sex pheromone-baited monitoring traps illuminated with infrared, red, white, or no light. No statistically significant differences were found between any of these treatments.


Gallery Characteristics And Life History Of The Ambrosia Beetle Trypodendron Betulae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) In Birch, Richard A. Roeper, Michael Allen, Teresa Hutchinson, Corrina Quidot, Mark Bunce 2017 Alma College

Gallery Characteristics And Life History Of The Ambrosia Beetle Trypodendron Betulae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) In Birch, Richard A. Roeper, Michael Allen, Teresa Hutchinson, Corrina Quidot, Mark Bunce

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Trypodendron betulae Swaine distributed attack entrance holes uniformly over the surface of standing stressed sub-canopy birch trees. Male and female pairs constructed galleries consisting of an entrance tunnel about 20 mm in length and then primary and secondary lateral tunnels averaging between 16 and 23 mm in length into the sapwood. Egg niches were constructed in the lateral tunnels after the symbiotic fungus was established in the galleries. Larvae enlarged the niches into cradles. Pupae and eventually teneral adults developed in the cradles. The sex ratio of resulting progeny adults was approximately one to one, and they emerged from galleries ...


Decline In Relative Abundance Of Hippodamia Convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) In Fall Shoreline Aggregations On Western Lake Superior, Wayne P. Steffens, Ryan P. Lumen 2017 Valparaiso University

Decline In Relative Abundance Of Hippodamia Convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) In Fall Shoreline Aggregations On Western Lake Superior, Wayne P. Steffens, Ryan P. Lumen

The Great Lakes Entomologist

In the 1970s, migratory coccinellid aggregations on western Lake Superior shorelines consisted of over 90% Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville. In 2014, the alien Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) accounted for over 80% of shoreline coccinellid aggregations and H. convergens declined to less than 10% of the total. Additional work is needed to elucidate the extent and cause of the decline of H. convergens in western Lake Superior shoreline aggregations.


Occurrence Of A Gynandromorphic Bombus Bimaculatus (Hymenoptera: Apidae) In Southeastern Ohio, MaLisa R. Spring, Katy S. Lustofin, Mary M. Gardiner 2017 The Ohio State University, Wooster

Occurrence Of A Gynandromorphic Bombus Bimaculatus (Hymenoptera: Apidae) In Southeastern Ohio, Malisa R. Spring, Katy S. Lustofin, Mary M. Gardiner

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Herein, we introduce the first reported case of gynandromorphy in the bumblebee Bombus bimaculatus (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Apidae), a relatively common North American species found east of the Mississippi River. The specimen was collected in Marietta, Ohio as part of a bee diversity assessment project for Washington County. Gynanders exhibit discrete male and female characters in a single individual. We discuss the potential causes of gynandromorphy exhibited by this specimen, which has differing antennal segments (12 and 13), facial maculation, abdominal hair coloration, and the presence of a corbicula – secondary sex characters that are characteristic for the genus Bombus.


New Records Of Native And Non-Native Bark And Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) In Illinois, Charles Helm, Brenda Molano-Flores 2017 Illinois Natural History Survey

New Records Of Native And Non-Native Bark And Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) In Illinois, Charles Helm, Brenda Molano-Flores

The Great Lakes Entomologist

From 2009–2012, we conducted surveys with Lindgren funnel traps for native and non-native bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in northeastern Illinois. During this study, we collected a total of 10,194 bark and ambrosia beetles representing 50 species in 28 genera. Ten scolytine species not previously reported to occur in Illinois were collected during this survey. Three of these new records are species not native to North America, including Cyclorhipidion bodoanum (Reitter), Cyclorhipidion pelliculosum (Eichhoff), and Hylastinus obscurus (Marsham). Native species reported from Illinois for the first time include: Anisandrus obesus (LeConte), Dryocoetes autographus (Ratzeburg), Hylocurus spadix ...


Comments On A Major Range Extension Of The Little-Known Acrocera Bakeri (Diptera: Acroceridae), Derek A. Woller, Sandor L. Kelly, Daniel K. Young 2017 Texas A&M University

Comments On A Major Range Extension Of The Little-Known Acrocera Bakeri (Diptera: Acroceridae), Derek A. Woller, Sandor L. Kelly, Daniel K. Young

The Great Lakes Entomologist

The spider fly Acrocera bakeri Coquillett, 1904 (Diptera: Acroceridae) is reported as a new state record for Wisconsin. This is a major range extension, because this rarely-encountered species was previously known only from the western U.S., specifically Arizona, California, and Nevada. The taxonomic history of the species is briefly discussed and hypotheses are offered for its unexpected presence in Wisconsin.


Detection Of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) Infestations With Sticky Traps, Jeffrey G. Fidgen, Mark C. Whitmore, Jean J. Turgeon 2017 Canadian Forest Service, Great Lakes Forestry Centre

Detection Of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) Infestations With Sticky Traps, Jeffrey G. Fidgen, Mark C. Whitmore, Jean J. Turgeon

The Great Lakes Entomologist

We deployed sticky traps underneath the crown of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière, to assess their sensitivity at detecting crawlers (1st instar nymphs) of the non-native hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). We found these traps more sensitive at detecting infested trees with low densities of A. tsugae than branch-tip sampling with pole pruners. We observed two peaks of crawler abundance at all sites: these peaks likely represented the timing of the progrediens and sistens crawler stages of A. tsugae. Deployment of sticky traps in treated and high-risk stands may prove useful at detecting residual and new ...


Ecological Traits Fail To Consistently Predict Moth Species Persistance In Managed Forest Stands, Keith S. Summerville 2017 Drake University

Ecological Traits Fail To Consistently Predict Moth Species Persistance In Managed Forest Stands, Keith S. Summerville

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Species traits have been used as predictors of species extinction and colonization probabilities in fragmented landscapes. Thus far, trait-based analytical frameworks have been less commonly employed as predictive tools for species persistence following a disturbance. I tested whether life history traits, dietary traits, and functional traits were correlated with moth species persistence probabilities in forest stands subjected to varying levels of timber harvest. Three harvest treatments were used: control stands (unharvested since 1960), shelterwood cut stands (15% canopy removed), and patch cut stands (80% standing bole removed). Logistic regression models were built to assess whether species persistence probabilities were a ...


Observations Of Xyleborus Affinis Eichhoff (Coleoptera:Curculionidae:Scolytinae) In Central Michigan, Richard A. Roeper, Mark A. Bunce, John E. Harlan, Richard G. Bowker 2017 Alma College

Observations Of Xyleborus Affinis Eichhoff (Coleoptera:Curculionidae:Scolytinae) In Central Michigan, Richard A. Roeper, Mark A. Bunce, John E. Harlan, Richard G. Bowker

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff colonized wind thrown timber in the moist floodplain habitats of Central Michigan. Single adult females constructed a complex gallery system consisting of phloem–sapwood interface tunnels and sapwood tunnels. An average of 24 progeny adults and a sex ratio of 14 females to 1 male were found in mature galleries after the first of September.


European Springtails Orchesella Cincta (L.) And O. Villosa (L.) (Collembola: Entomobryidae): Vagabond Species Of The Nearctic Region, Catherine L. Smith, John K. Moulton, Ernest C. Bernard 2017 University of Tennessee

European Springtails Orchesella Cincta (L.) And O. Villosa (L.) (Collembola: Entomobryidae): Vagabond Species Of The Nearctic Region, Catherine L. Smith, John K. Moulton, Ernest C. Bernard

The Great Lakes Entomologist

North American specimens of the European invasive springtail Orchesella cincta (L.) were compared to several published European haplotypes in a phylogenetic framework using likelihood methods based on a portion of cytochrome oxidase II (cox2). Our analyses provide direct evidence of at least two distinct introductions of this invasive to North America from different regions of Europe. Additional introduction events cannot be ruled out because detection is limited by extremely low sequence divergence among populations inhabiting different regions of the continent. Orchesella villosa (L.), another invasive from Europe, is another candidate for multiple introductions. Herein we include the cox2 sequence from ...


A Naturalist's Guide To Ontario (Book Review), R. C. Graves 2017 Valparaiso University

A Naturalist's Guide To Ontario (Book Review), R. C. Graves

The Great Lakes Entomologist

A NATURALIST'S GUIDE TO ONTARIO. W. W. Judd and J. M. Speirs (eds.). Published for the Federation of Ontario Naturalists by University of Toronto Press. 210 pp., 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 in. 1964. Price: cloth, $4.95; paper, $1.95.


The David-Gardiner Method Of Feeding Lepidopterous Larvae On A Semi-Synthetic Diet, Ronald Sterne Wilkinson 2017 University College, London

The David-Gardiner Method Of Feeding Lepidopterous Larvae On A Semi-Synthetic Diet, Ronald Sterne Wilkinson

The Great Lakes Entomologist

[excerpt] One of the most interesting entomological developments in re- cent years has been the introduction of semi-synthetic diets for feed- ing lepidopterous larvae. Vanderzant and Reiser (1956a, 1956b) reared pink bollworms (Pectinophora gossypiella) on such a medium. The medium was subsequently modified by Ignoffo (1963), who experimented with mass-rearing of the cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni), and by oth- ers. The method showing the most spectacular results is that of David and Gardiner (19651, which, since its publication, has been proven suitable for a number of species with diverse feeding habits. Although not a universal pabulum for larvae, the David-Gardiner ...


Relative Susceptibilities Of Three Ponderosa Pine Sources To European Pine Sawfly (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae) Attack In Michigan, Louis F. Wilson 2017 Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Relative Susceptibilities Of Three Ponderosa Pine Sources To European Pine Sawfly (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae) Attack In Michigan, Louis F. Wilson

The Great Lakes Entomologist

[excerpt] Accidentally introduced into New Jersey about 1925, the European pine sawfly, Neodiprion sertifer (Geoffroy), now inhabits most of the Northeastern and North Central States and Ontario, Canada. Red pine, Pinus resinosa Aiton, and most other native and exotic pines within its range are susceptible to attack. Few attack records are available for ponderosa pine, P. ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson, because this pine is uncommon in eastern North America. Soraci (1939) ob- served egg clusters and larval feeding on planted red and ponderosa pine in New Jersey; Benjamin et al. (1955) found egg clusters on ponderosa pine in Illinois and ...


A New Nearctic Triclistus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), R. W. Carlson 2017 University of Michigan

A New Nearctic Triclistus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), R. W. Carlson

The Great Lakes Entomologist

[excerpt] When Townes and Townes (1959) revised the genus Triclistus along with the rest of the Nearctic Metopiinae, they decided not to describe what was thought likely to be an additional new species, because only one male specimen was known. More recently, additional specimens, both males and females, were collected. From the females, which are even more distinctive than the males, it was easily seen that the species described below is indeed a new one.


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