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Studies On The Changes In Nectar Concentration Produced By The Honeybee, Apis Mellifera Part I. Changes Which Occur Between The Flower And The Hive, O. W. Park 2017 Iowa State College

Studies On The Changes In Nectar Concentration Produced By The Honeybee, Apis Mellifera Part I. Changes Which Occur Between The Flower And The Hive, O. W. Park

Research Bulletin (Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station)

1. The honeybee changes the concentration of nectar or sirup only very slightly while en route to the hive.

2. The change is a decrease instead of an increase as has been assumed by many heretofore.

3. The amount of decrease varies directly with the concentration of the nectar or sirup.

4. Observed mean decreases varied from one-fiftieth of 1 percent on a 13 percent sirup to 1.8 percent on a 64 percent sirup.

5. The average decrease for Iowa nectars commonly gathered by the honeybee is about 1 percent.

6. "Carry-over" from the previous load is relatively unimportant ...


The Biology Of The Stalk Borer Papaipema Nebris (Gn.), George C. Decker 2017 Iowa State College

The Biology Of The Stalk Borer Papaipema Nebris (Gn.), George C. Decker

Research Bulletin (Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station)

1. The stalk borer, Papaipema. nebris (Gn.), is a native American insect, normally feeding upon Ambrosia trifida but occasionally causing considerable damage to corn and other crops.

2. There is but one generation each year. The overwintering eggs hatch during late April or early May and after a growing period of from 9 to 18 weeks the larvae pupate. The moths emerge during August or September and begin at once to deposit eggs for the next year's brood upon the leaves of grass and weeds.

3. The number of larval instars required to complete development varied from seven to ...


The Biology Of The Four-Lined Borer Luperina Stipata (Morr.), George C. Decker 2017 Iowa State College

The Biology Of The Four-Lined Borer Luperina Stipata (Morr.), George C. Decker

Research Bulletin (Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station)

1. The four-lined borer, Luperina stipata (Morr.), is a native insect, normally feeding upon slough grass, but occasionally causing considerable "dead heart" damage to corn.

2. There is but one generation each year. The overwintering eggs hatch during late April or early May, and after a growing period of from 10 to 14 weeks the larvae pupate. The moths emerge during the fore part of August and deposit eggs for the next year's brood.

3. Quality of food and temperature materially affected the length of larval life of laboratory specimens. Apparently quality of food (succulent versus woody) determined the ...


Time Factors In Relation To The Acquisition Of Food By The Honeybee, O. W. Park 2017 Iowa State College

Time Factors In Relation To The Acquisition Of Food By The Honeybee, O. W. Park

Research Bulletin (Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station)

1. Of all the various methods for marking honeybees tried by the author, the one found best adapted for the present investigation was that of applying pigment combined with white shellac in alcohol.

2. A contrivance of simple construction was devised which, when placed in the entrance of a hive, caused practically every incoming and outgoing bee to pass thru the entrance dorsal side up, thereby enabling the observer to detect the marked bees.

3. A suitable method was discovered for distinguishing between nectar-carriers and water-carriers without injury to the bee.

4. The average speed determined for the flight of ...


Control Policies And Sensitivity Analysis In A Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Model: A Case Study In Cusco Region, Peru., Rocio M. Caja-Rivera, Ignacio Barradas 2017 CIMAT

Control Policies And Sensitivity Analysis In A Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Model: A Case Study In Cusco Region, Peru., Rocio M. Caja-Rivera, Ignacio Barradas

Biology and Medicine Through Mathematics Conference

No abstract provided.


Bodybuilding Bumblebees: How Exercise Affects Bumblebee (Bombus Impatiens) Flight Muscle, Kaylee R. Alles 2017 University of Wyoming

Bodybuilding Bumblebees: How Exercise Affects Bumblebee (Bombus Impatiens) Flight Muscle, Kaylee R. Alles

Honors Theses AY 16/17

Insect flight muscle is the most metabolically active tissue known, allowing for production of the large forces necessary for flight. Flight ability varies among insects and with insect age, which is partially due to differences in muscle. However, very little work has examined whether and how insect muscle may respond to exercise. One key response may be a change in the amount of flight muscle relative to body mass ("flight muscle ratio", FMR), analogous to bulkier muscle in bodybuilders. We examined differences in FMR among bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) sisters differing in body size and in "training". We trained the bees ...


Creative Nonnatives: Painting Invasive Insects Of The United States, Monica Tynan 2017 University of Rhode Island

Creative Nonnatives: Painting Invasive Insects Of The United States, Monica Tynan

Senior Honors Projects

An invasive species is a nonnative organism that may cause damage to an ecosystem. Invasive species cause problems in an environment by outcompeting native organisms for resources or by feeding upon native species. Invasive insects in particular can harm an ecosystem by consuming foliage and decreasing biodiversity. During my experience at the Preisser Lab at the University of Rhode Island, I witnessed rsthand the damage that invasive insects can do to a tree population, and I learned about how ecosystem dynamics can be disrupted by the introduction of a nonnative species.

My project portrays an aesthetically pleasing visualization of several ...


Flight Activity, Oviposition Pit Distribution, And Emergence Densities Of Monochamus Titillator And M. Carolinensis In The Ozark-St. Francis National Forest In Arkansas, Jake Bodart 2017 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Flight Activity, Oviposition Pit Distribution, And Emergence Densities Of Monochamus Titillator And M. Carolinensis In The Ozark-St. Francis National Forest In Arkansas, Jake Bodart

Theses and Dissertations

Monochamus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) are a genus of longhorn beetles commonly known as pine sawyers. They have a worldwide distribution coincident with pines (Pinaceae) and are vectors of the pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus). In the United States, there are eight known Monochamus species and they have a sympatric distribution with at least one other Monochamus species throughout their range. Monochamus are known to attack stressed, dead, and dying conifers especially pines. In the Ozark- St. Francis National Forest in Arkansas, there are two species of pine sawyers and they share this sympatric distribution observed throughout the United States, M. titillator (southern ...


Elucidating The Effects Of Thiamethoxam Neonicotinoid On Honey Bee Learning Using The Proboscis Extension Response, David J. Shepherd 2017 East Tennessee State University

Elucidating The Effects Of Thiamethoxam Neonicotinoid On Honey Bee Learning Using The Proboscis Extension Response, David J. Shepherd

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this study, the effects of the neonicotinoid pesticide, thiamethoxam, are examined through the Proboscis Extension Response (PER) in honey bees (Apis mellifera). PER is a form of classical conditioning applied to honey bees through scent and reward association which quantifies learning rates. Results between groups treated with thiamethoxam did not differ significantly from untreated control groups. Potential reasons for these results are discussed. The method and experimental apparatus for testing the PER assay are also discussed.


Last County In Iowa Found Infested With Scn, Greg Tylka, Brian Lang 2017 Iowa State University

Last County In Iowa Found Infested With Scn, Greg Tylka, Brian Lang

Gregory Tylka

More than 100 fields throughout Iowa were surveyed for the presence of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) in 2016 in a project sponsored by the ISU Soybean Research Center and the Iowa Soybean Association (ISA). Soil samples were collected by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach field agronomists and ISA staff and interns and sent to the ISU Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic for processing.


Performance Of Scn-Resistant Soybean Varieties In Iowa In 2016, Greg Tylka 2017 Iowa State University

Performance Of Scn-Resistant Soybean Varieties In Iowa In 2016, Greg Tylka

Gregory Tylka

Soybean varieties that are resistant to the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) are essential tools for managing the pest. Resistance to SCN requires multiple genes, and soybean varieties bred to be resistant may not contain all of the resistance genes necessary to provide maximum nematode control. Consequently, SCN control can vary greatly among resistant soybean varieties, just as yield. Iowa State University evaluates the SCN control and yield of SCN-resistant soybean varieties in field experiments conducted throughout Iowa annually. The effort is supported, in part, by soybean checkoff funds from the Iowa Soybean Association.


The Genus Agastache As Bee Forage: A Historical Perspective, George S. Ayres, Mark P. Widrlechner 2017 Michigan State University

The Genus Agastache As Bee Forage: A Historical Perspective, George S. Ayres, Mark P. Widrlechner

Mark P. Widrlechner

The September 1992 and January 1993 "The Other Side of Beekeeping" requested reader input about experiences with anise hyssop. This series of articles is our response to your replies. Most who made plantings were disappointed, yet historically, very competent apiculturists thought very highly of anise hyssop. In addition, our experiences with this plant and several closely related species make us ponder why the responses were not more positive. In this article, we review the history and biology of the genus Agastache as a bee forage. In the second article of the series, we will use this information to speculate on ...


Ixodes Brunneus (Acari: Ixodidae) From Two Bird Hosts: A New Michigan Tick, Richard S. Keith, Brenda S. Keith, William C. Scharf, Sarah A. Hamer 2017 Kalamazoo Valley Bird Observatory, Kalamazoo Nature Center

Ixodes Brunneus (Acari: Ixodidae) From Two Bird Hosts: A New Michigan Tick, Richard S. Keith, Brenda S. Keith, William C. Scharf, Sarah A. Hamer

The Great Lakes Entomologist

The tick Ixodes brunneus Koch (Acari: Ixodidae) is reported for the first time in Michigan from two bird hosts at two locations in the lower peninsula. All stages of this tick exclusively feed on birds, and are primarily known from the southern U.S., although abundant records occur from northern states. The role of this species as a vector of pathogens is discussed.


First Report Of Leptomantispa Pulchella (Banks, 1912) (Neuroptera: Mantispidae) From Iowa, Edwin L. Freese, Paul K. Lago 2017 University of Mississippi

First Report Of Leptomantispa Pulchella (Banks, 1912) (Neuroptera: Mantispidae) From Iowa, Edwin L. Freese, Paul K. Lago

The Great Lakes Entomologist

An adult specimen of Leptomantispa pulchella (Banks) (Neuroptera: Mantispidae) was collected in southeast Iowa. Published records indicate the species is present in southwestern Canada and much of Central America, but this is the first published report of this species from Iowa.


Feeding Records Of True Bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) From Wisconsin, Supplement, Andrew H. Williams 2017 Valparaiso University

Feeding Records Of True Bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) From Wisconsin, Supplement, Andrew H. Williams

The Great Lakes Entomologist

In order to understand any animal and its habitat requirements, we must know what it eats. Reported here are observations of feeding by 27 species of true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) encountered in various habitats in Wisconsin over the years 2003–2014. This is the first report of Anasa repetita Heidemann (Coreidae) from Wisconsin.


Macromia Alleghaniensis (Odonata: Macromiidae): New For Michigan, With Clarifications Of Northern Records, Julie A. Craves, Darrin S. O’Brien 2017 University of Michigan, Dearborn

Macromia Alleghaniensis (Odonata: Macromiidae): New For Michigan, With Clarifications Of Northern Records, Julie A. Craves, Darrin S. O’Brien

The Great Lakes Entomologist

An Alleghany River Cruiser, Macromia alleghaniensis Williamson (Odonata: Macromiidae), collected in Cass County, Michigan on 18 June 2014, represents the first record of the species for the state, as well as the northernmost unequivocal record in North America. Other records north of 40° latitude are clarified and discussed.


Occurrence Of Treehopper (Hemiptera: Membracidae) Bycatch On Purple Panel Traps And Lindgren Funnel Traps In Pennsylvania, With New State Records, Lawrence Barringer 2017 Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

Occurrence Of Treehopper (Hemiptera: Membracidae) Bycatch On Purple Panel Traps And Lindgren Funnel Traps In Pennsylvania, With New State Records, Lawrence Barringer

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Surveys for invasive insects in Pennsylvania conducted from 2009-2013 captured large numbers of native treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae). These were collected using Lindgren funnel traps and purple prism traps totaling 1,434 specimens in eight tribes, 20 genera, and 57 species. As a result of this work Pennsylvania now has four new published species records: Heliria gibberata Ball 1925, Palonica pyramidata (Uhler 1877), Telamona projecta Butler 1877, and Telamona westcotti Goding 1893. With proper site selection Lindgren funnel traps may be able to capture ten to hundreds of treehoppers in a single season, especially within the Smiliinae: Smiliini and Telamonini.


Infrared Lighting Does Not Suppress Catch Of Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) In Pheromone-Baited Monitoring Traps, C. G. Adams, P. S. McGhee, J. R. Miller 2017 Michigan State University

Infrared Lighting Does Not Suppress Catch Of Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) In Pheromone-Baited Monitoring Traps, C. G. Adams, P. S. Mcghee, J. R. Miller

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Video cameras are increasingly being used to record insect behaviors in the field over prolonged intervals. A nagging question about crepuscular and nocturnal recordings is whether or not infrared light emitted by such cameras to illuminate the scene influences the behaviors of the subjects or study outcomes. Here we quantified catches of male codling moths, Cydia pomonella (L.), responding to sex pheromone-baited monitoring traps illuminated with infrared, red, white, or no light. No statistically significant differences were found between any of these treatments.


Gallery Characteristics And Life History Of The Ambrosia Beetle Trypodendron Betulae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) In Birch, Richard A. Roeper, Michael Allen, Teresa Hutchinson, Corrina Quidot, Mark Bunce 2017 Alma College

Gallery Characteristics And Life History Of The Ambrosia Beetle Trypodendron Betulae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) In Birch, Richard A. Roeper, Michael Allen, Teresa Hutchinson, Corrina Quidot, Mark Bunce

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Trypodendron betulae Swaine distributed attack entrance holes uniformly over the surface of standing stressed sub-canopy birch trees. Male and female pairs constructed galleries consisting of an entrance tunnel about 20 mm in length and then primary and secondary lateral tunnels averaging between 16 and 23 mm in length into the sapwood. Egg niches were constructed in the lateral tunnels after the symbiotic fungus was established in the galleries. Larvae enlarged the niches into cradles. Pupae and eventually teneral adults developed in the cradles. The sex ratio of resulting progeny adults was approximately one to one, and they emerged from galleries ...


Decline In Relative Abundance Of Hippodamia Convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) In Fall Shoreline Aggregations On Western Lake Superior, Wayne P. Steffens, Ryan P. Lumen 2017 Valparaiso University

Decline In Relative Abundance Of Hippodamia Convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) In Fall Shoreline Aggregations On Western Lake Superior, Wayne P. Steffens, Ryan P. Lumen

The Great Lakes Entomologist

In the 1970s, migratory coccinellid aggregations on western Lake Superior shorelines consisted of over 90% Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville. In 2014, the alien Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) accounted for over 80% of shoreline coccinellid aggregations and H. convergens declined to less than 10% of the total. Additional work is needed to elucidate the extent and cause of the decline of H. convergens in western Lake Superior shoreline aggregations.


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