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Cankerworms, Marion Murray, Erin W. Hodgson 2020 Utah State University

Cankerworms, Marion Murray, Erin W. Hodgson

All Current Publications

Cankerworms, also known as inchworms, are in the order Lepidoptera and family Geometridae. Geometrid moth adults have slender bodies and relatively large, broad forewings (Figs. 1, 3). Both fall, Alsophila pometaria, and spring, Paleacrita vernata, cankerworms occur in Utah, with the fall cankerworm being most common.


Soft Scales In Utah, Marion Murray, Erin W. Hodgson 2020 Utah State University

Soft Scales In Utah, Marion Murray, Erin W. Hodgson

All Current Publications

Soft scales are insects in the family Coccidae and are closely related to armored and felt scales and mealybugs. Scales are fluid feeders with piercingsucking mouthparts that remove plant phloem or sap. Most life stages are immobile because they anchor their mouthparts into host tissue. They are difficult to control because of their waxy covering, seasonal abundance, and high fecundity.


Impact Of Buckwheat And Methyl Salicylate Lures On Natural Enemy Abundance For Early Season Management Of Melanaphis Sacchari (Hemiptera: Aphididae) In Sweet Sorghum, Nathan Mercer 2020 University of Kentucky

Impact Of Buckwheat And Methyl Salicylate Lures On Natural Enemy Abundance For Early Season Management Of Melanaphis Sacchari (Hemiptera: Aphididae) In Sweet Sorghum, Nathan Mercer

Entomology Research Data

Tested effect of buckwheat flowers and methyl salicylate lures to attract natural enemies to sweet sorghum fields to manage Melanaphis sacchari, a recent pest of sweet sorghum.


Imported Fire Ants, Ryan Davis, Ann Mull, Lori R. Spears 2020 Utah State University

Imported Fire Ants, Ryan Davis, Ann Mull, Lori R. Spears

All Current Publications

Imported fire ants (Order Hymenoptera, Family Formicidae) (IFA) are social insects representing two South American ant species: the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren) and black imported fire ant (Solenopsis richteri Forel), along with their hybrid offspring. IFA are native to South America, where their colonies are kept in check by native competitors, predators, and parasites. However, they have invaded other countries, including Australia, New Zealand, and the U.S., causing agricultural, ecological, economical, nuisance, and public health problems, which are described in more detail in this fact sheet. Management is also addressed.


Juvenile Hormone Mediation In An Insect With Parental Care Behavior, Jessica M. Rodino 2020 University of Nebraska at Omaha

Juvenile Hormone Mediation In An Insect With Parental Care Behavior, Jessica M. Rodino

Student Research and Creative Activity Fair

Juvenile hormone (JH) is a well-known catalyst for hormonal processes in insects. However, the role of JH in insects that exhibit parental behavior is unknown. We investigated the influence of JH on parental behavior in the burying beetle (Nicrophorus orbicollis). In the first experiment, we manipulated the JH production of females via the administration of varying doses of fluvastatin sodium immediately following oviposition. We found that with increasing fluvastatin dosage, the total mass of offspring and number of offspring decreased while at the same time less of the food source was consumed. These results suggest a link between juvenile hormone ...


A History Of Zinnias: Flower For The Ages, Eric Grissell 2020 Purdue University

A History Of Zinnias: Flower For The Ages, Eric Grissell

Purdue University Press Book Previews

A History of Zinnias brings forward the fascinating adventure of zinnias and the spirit of civilization. With colorful illustrations, this book is a cultural and horticultural history documenting the development of garden zinnias—one of the top ten garden annuals grown in the United States today.

The deep and exciting history of garden zinnias pieces together a tale involving Aztecs, Spanish conquistadors, people of faith, people of medicine, explorers, scientists, writers, botanists, painters, and gardeners. The trail leads from the halls of Moctezuma to a cliff-diving prime minister; from Handel, Mozart, and Rossini to Gilbert and Sullivan; from a little-known ...


Evaluation Of Xl370a-Derived Maize Germplasm For Resistance To Leaf Feeding By Fall Armyworm, Craig A. Abel, Brad S. Coates, Mark Millard, W. Paul Williams, M. Paul Scott 2020 United States Department of Agriculture

Evaluation Of Xl370a-Derived Maize Germplasm For Resistance To Leaf Feeding By Fall Armyworm, Craig A. Abel, Brad S. Coates, Mark Millard, W. Paul Williams, M. Paul Scott

NCRPIS Publications and Papers

The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is an economically important insect with larvae damaging maize (Zea mays L.) leaves and ear tissue. The pest has become resistant to several classes of insecticide and Bt-maize grown in some geographical areas. Once discovered and characterized, native sources of maize resistance to this pest could be effectively integrated with existing control tactics. The objective for this study was to test experimental lines derived from maize germplasm XL370A for resistance to leaf feeding by fall armyworm. Plants were grown in the field in 2018 and 2019, artificially infested with fall ...


New Genera, Species, And Records Of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) From Hispaniola, Steven W. Lingafelter 2020 Hereford, Arizona

New Genera, Species, And Records Of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) From Hispaniola, Steven W. Lingafelter

Insecta Mundi

Two new genera of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), Luctithonus Lingafelter and Duocris­tala Lingafelter, are described from Hispaniola. Two new species of Luctithonus are described: Luctithonus aski Lingafelter and L. duartensis Lingafelter. A third species, L. pantherinus (Zayas), is newly recorded from Hispan­iola and the Dominican Republic (new country record), and transferred from Sternidius Haldeman as a new combination. Additional new species of Lamiinae are described from Hispaniola: Eugamandus albipumilus Lingafelter; Leptostylopsis opuntiae Lingafelter; and Lethes turnbowi Lingafelter. Keys to tribes of Lamiinae, genera of Acanthocinini, and species of Luctithonus in Hispaniola are included.


New State Record And Range Extension For Mycterus Youngi Pollock (Coleoptera: Mycteridae) – But Is It Really Rare?, Daniel K. Young 2020 University of Wisconsin

New State Record And Range Extension For Mycterus Youngi Pollock (Coleoptera: Mycteridae) – But Is It Really Rare?, Daniel K. Young

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Mycterus youngi was described from Wisconsin and “L.S” (presumed to indicate along Lake Superior). All but one of the specimens in the type series were collected between 1947 and 1949. Herein, three females of M. youngi are reported from Michigan, between 1910 and 1940. A discussion of possible implications of the few, and largely old collection dates is provided.


Further New Records Of Coleoptera And Other Insects From Wisconsin, Jordan D. Marche II 2020 independent scholar

Further New Records Of Coleoptera And Other Insects From Wisconsin, Jordan D. Marche Ii

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Specimens of eleven different species of insects, representing seven separate families of Coleoptera, and one family each of Hemiptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera, and Hymenoptera, are herein reported as new to Wisconsin. These genera or species occur respectively within the following families: Leiodidae, Monotomidae, Cucujidae, Cryptophagidae, Ciidae, Tetratomidae, Curculionidae, Pentatomidae, Glyphipterigidae, Phoridae, and Pteromalidae. All but one of these insects were collected at or near the author’s residence (Dane County); the pentatomid was taken in northern Wisconsin (Oconto County). Three of the four non-coleopteran fauna are introduced species.


Parasitism Of Female Neotibicen Linnei (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) By Larvae Of The Sarcophagid Fly Emblemasoma Erro In Wisconsin, Allen M. Young 2020 Milwaukee Public Museum

Parasitism Of Female Neotibicen Linnei (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) By Larvae Of The Sarcophagid Fly Emblemasoma Erro In Wisconsin, Allen M. Young

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Herein it is reported an unusual case of parasitism of a female Neotibicen linnei (Smith and Grossbeck) by the sarcophagid Emblemasoma erro (Aldrich) in western Wisconsin. Sarcophagids typically attack male cicadas, locating them by the latter’s acoustical behavior.

Some members of the dipteran family Sarcophagidae are parasitic on male cicadas (e.g. Soper et. al. 1976, Lakes-Harlan et. al. 2000, Faris et. al. 2008, Stucky 2015). Parasitoids such as Emblemasoma species are attracted to larviposit on male cicadas by responding to the latter’s acoustical signals (Tron et. al. 2016). Sarcophagids, therefore, are generally not attracted to mute female ...


Ciidae Of Michigan (Insecta: Coleoptera), Luna Grey, Anthony I. Cognato 2020 Unaffiliated

Ciidae Of Michigan (Insecta: Coleoptera), Luna Grey, Anthony I. Cognato

The Great Lakes Entomologist

The family Ciidae Leach, 1819, occurs worldwide with approximately 720 species. In the United States there are 84 species in 13 genera. Given their relatively small size (~0.5 to 6 mm) and cryptic habitats, feeding in decaying fungi, recent regional fauna studies are lacking including the northeastern United States. To alleviate this gap in knowledge, in part, we review and identify 2,123 undetermined specimens collected in Michigan. We provide new state records for four species: Ceracis pecki Lawrence 1971, Cis americanus Mannerheim, 1852, Cis submicans Abeille de Perrin, 1874, Dolicocis manitoba Dury, 1919 which increases the total for ...


Leaf Mining Insects And Their Parasitoids In The Old-Growth Forest Of The Huron Mountains, Ronald J. Priest, Robert R. Kula, Michael W. Gates 2020 Michigan State University

Leaf Mining Insects And Their Parasitoids In The Old-Growth Forest Of The Huron Mountains, Ronald J. Priest, Robert R. Kula, Michael W. Gates

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Leaf mining insects in an old-growth forest along the south central shore of Lake Superior in Michigan are documented. We present the results of a 13-year survey of leaf mining species, larval hosts, seasonal occurrence, and parasitoids, as well as report biological observations. Representative larvae, mines, adults, and parasitoids were preserved. Among the larval host associations, 15 are reported as new. Additionally, 42 parasitoid taxa were identified resulting in six first reports from the New World and 32 new host associations. Two undescribed species (Gelechiidae and Figitidae) discovered through this research were described in earlier publications.


Effect Of Laboratory Heat Stress On Mortality And Web Mass Of The Common House Spider, Parasteatoda Tepidariorum (Koch 1841) (Araneae: Theridiidae), Aubrey J. Brown, David Houghton 2020 Hillsdale College

Effect Of Laboratory Heat Stress On Mortality And Web Mass Of The Common House Spider, Parasteatoda Tepidariorum (Koch 1841) (Araneae: Theridiidae), Aubrey J. Brown, David Houghton

The Great Lakes Entomologist

We determined the effects of chronic heat stress on web construction of Parasteatoda tepidariorum (Araneae: Theridiidae) by measuring the survival and web mass of specimens after a 48-h period within a temperature chamber at 21, 30, 35, 40, or 50°C. The 21, 30 and 35°C treatments had the highest mean survival rate (100%), the 50°C treatment had the lowest (0%), and the 40°C treatment was intermediate (58%). The 21, 30, and 35°C treatments had the highest mean web mass, and the 40 and 50°C treatments had the lowest. Web mass did not correlate with ...


Hidden Dangers To Researcher Safety While Sampling Freshwater Benthic Macroinvertebrates, Ralph D. Stoaks 2020 Colorado State University

Hidden Dangers To Researcher Safety While Sampling Freshwater Benthic Macroinvertebrates, Ralph D. Stoaks

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Abstract

This paper reviews hidden dangers that threaten the safety of freshwater (FW) researchers of benthic macroinvertebrates (BMIs). Six refereed journals containing 2,075 papers were reviewed for field research resulting in 505 FW BMI articles. However, danger was reported in only 18% of FW BMI papers. I discussed: 1) papers that did not warn of existing danger and consider researcher safety, 2) metric threshold values (e.g., chemical hazards), and non-metric dangers, (e.g., caves and aquatic habitats), 3), the frequency of danger occurrence, 4) baseline and extreme values. Examples of 28 danger factors that posed a threat to ...


Lessons Learned: Rearing The Crown-Boring Weevil, Ceutorhynchus Scrobicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), In Containment For Biological Control Of Garlic Mustard (Alliaria Petiolata), Elizabeth J. Katovich, Roger L. Becker, Esther Gerber, Hariet L. Hinz, Ghislaine Cortat 2020 University of Minnesota

Lessons Learned: Rearing The Crown-Boring Weevil, Ceutorhynchus Scrobicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), In Containment For Biological Control Of Garlic Mustard (Alliaria Petiolata), Elizabeth J. Katovich, Roger L. Becker, Esther Gerber, Hariet L. Hinz, Ghislaine Cortat

The Great Lakes Entomologist

In this paper, we describe lessons learned and protocols developed after a decade of rearing Ceutorhynchus scrobicollis Nerenscheimer and Wagner in a Biosafety Level 2 containment facility. We have developed these protocols in anticipation of approval to release C. scrobicollis in North America for the biocontrol of garlic mustard. The rearing protocol tried to minimize the potential of attack by the adult parasitoid, Perilitus conseutor, which may be present in field collected C. scrobicollis from Europe to prevent inadvertent introduction of parasitoids into North America.

All C. scrobicollis used for our quarantine rearing were field collected near Berlin, Germany. We ...


Photoperiodic Response Of Abrostola Asclepiadis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), A Candidate Biological Control Agent For Swallow-Worts (Vincetoxicum, Apocynaceae), Lindsey R. Milbrath, Margarita Dolgovskaya, Mark Volkovitsh, René F.H. Sforza, Jeromy Biazzo 2020 USDA, Agricultural Research Service

Photoperiodic Response Of Abrostola Asclepiadis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), A Candidate Biological Control Agent For Swallow-Worts (Vincetoxicum, Apocynaceae), Lindsey R. Milbrath, Margarita Dolgovskaya, Mark Volkovitsh, René F.H. Sforza, Jeromy Biazzo

The Great Lakes Entomologist

A biological control program is in development for two swallow-wort species (Vincetoxicum, Apocynaceae), European vines introduced into northeastern North America. One candidate agent is the defoliator Abrostola asclepiadis (Denis and Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The moth reportedly has up to two generations in parts of its native range. We assessed the potential multivoltinism of Russian and French populations of the moth by rearing them under constant and changing photoperiods, ranging from 13:11 to 16:8 hour (L:D). The French population was also reared outdoors under naturally-changing day lengths at a latitude similar to northern New York State. Less than ...


New State Records For Some Predatory And Parasitic True Bugs (Heteroptera: Cimicomorpha) Of The United States, Daniel R. Swanson 2020 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

New State Records For Some Predatory And Parasitic True Bugs (Heteroptera: Cimicomorpha) Of The United States, Daniel R. Swanson

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Forty new state records, distributed among Anthocoridae, Cimicidae, Lasiochilidae, Lyctocoridae, Nabidae, and Reduviidae, are reported for 25 species of Cimicomorpha found in the United States.


Tgle Vol. 52 Nos. 3 & 4 Cover Pages, 2020 Valparaiso University

Tgle Vol. 52 Nos. 3 & 4 Cover Pages

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Cover Pages for TGLE Vol. 52 Nos. 3 & 4


Tgle Vol. 52 Nos. 3 & 4 Cover Art, 2020 Valparaiso University

Tgle Vol. 52 Nos. 3 & 4 Cover Art

The Great Lakes Entomologist

Cover Art for TGLE Vol. 52 Nos. 3 & 4


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