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The Use Of Argumentation In Socio-Scientific Issues: Enhancing Evolutionary Biology Instruction, Heath R. Marchand 2015 The College at Brockport

The Use Of Argumentation In Socio-Scientific Issues: Enhancing Evolutionary Biology Instruction, Heath R. Marchand

Education and Human Development Master's Theses

With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), further emphasis in science education is being placed on preparing students to become more informed voters regarding social, ethical, economic and political topics that affect contemporary society. Parallel to this shift is a stronger emphasis on integrating evolutionary theory as a unifying concept in the biological sciences. Given that evolution is one of the aforementioned topics commonly discussed and debated about in social and political arenas, ensuring that instruction provides students from all backgrounds a comprehensive understanding of its principals is becoming increasingly important in contemporary science education. Chapter II ...


Ecology - As I See It, Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds 2015 Linfield College

Ecology - As I See It, Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds

Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds Documents

Dr. Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds summarizes her research experiences on Saddleback Mountain in Oregon. Several handwritten corrections are included. Dirks-Edmunds began studying the area in 1933 with her advisor at Linfield College, Dr. James A. Macnab. In 1940, the research site was logged and her study switched from detailing an existing Douglas fir community to tracking its regrowth.

Dr. Dirks-Edmunds graduated from Linfield College in 1937; she returned to teach in the Biology department at Linfield from 1941-1974.


Comparison Of Biotic Communities Of The Cedar-Hemlock And Oak-Hickory Associations, Draft Version, Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds 2015 Linfield College

Comparison Of Biotic Communities Of The Cedar-Hemlock And Oak-Hickory Associations, Draft Version, Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds

Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds Documents

This early, typewritten draft of Dr. Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds's doctoral dissertation contains her edits and notes. Dirks-Edmunds's project compared the Douglas fir forest community on Saddleback Mountain in Oregon to an oak-hickory forest near her graduate school in Illinois.

Dr. Dirks-Edmunds graduated from Linfield College in 1937; she later returned to teach in the Biology department at Linfield from 1941-1974.


Seasonal Dynamics And Micro-Climatic Preference Of Two Alpine Endemic Hypogean Beetles, Stefano Mammola, Elena Piano, Pier Mauro Giachino, Marco Isaia 2015 University of Turin, Torino

Seasonal Dynamics And Micro-Climatic Preference Of Two Alpine Endemic Hypogean Beetles, Stefano Mammola, Elena Piano, Pier Mauro Giachino, Marco Isaia

International Journal of Speleology

Hypogean beetles generally live in stable environments, characterized by constant temperature and high relative humidity. Changes in the underground microclimatic conditions generally induce local migrations of the beetles through the hypogean environment in search of suitable microhabitats. We studied the seasonal dynamics and the micro-climatic preference of two Alpine endemic hypogean beetles - Sphodropsis ghilianii (Coleoptera, Carabidae) and Dellabeffaella roccae (Coleoptera, Cholevidae) - in the hypogean complex of Pugnetto (Graian Alps, Italy). We surveyed the two species for one year, using baited pitfall traps and measuring temperature and humidity along the two main caves. We used logistic regression mixed models (GLMMs) to ...


Tolerance Of The Invasive New Zealand Mud Snail To Various Decontamination Procedures, Christopher N. Acy 2015 Lawrence University

Tolerance Of The Invasive New Zealand Mud Snail To Various Decontamination Procedures, Christopher N. Acy

Lawrence University Honors Projects

In an attempt to stop the spread of invasive species, state governments have established decontamination procedures for use on contaminated equipment. However, different species can tolerate various procedures depending on their morphology and physiology. The New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) is invasive to the United States and may alter the food web of streams due to the snail’s high reproductive ability, causing potential problems for native trout populations and local economies. We collected mud snails from the recently invaded Black Earth Creek, WI and tested their tolerance to decontamination protocols being considered by the Wisconsin Department of Natural ...


Diel Vertical Migration Of An Invasive Calanoid Copepod, Eurytemora Affinis, In Little Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, Alexandra N. Poli 2015 Lawrence University

Diel Vertical Migration Of An Invasive Calanoid Copepod, Eurytemora Affinis, In Little Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, Alexandra N. Poli

Lawrence University Honors Projects

Eurytemora affinis, a calanoid copepod, is known to be a versatile, prolific invader of freshwater ecosystems across the globe. It has recently been documented in the Laurentian Great Lakes, including in Little Sturgeon Bay, an embayment of Lake Michigan. One survival mechanism that could make E. affinis a successful invader is diel vertical migration (DVM), a behavior in which animals move to different lakes depths at different times of day in order to avoid predation. Much is known about DVM of E. affinis, but primarily from studies in marine and brackish systems. Our goal was to investigate how E. affinis ...


Influence Of Simulated Double-Crested Cormorant, Phalacrocorax Auritus, Predation On Multiple-Batch Production Of Channel Catfish, Ictalurus Punctatus, Brian S. Dorr, Carole R. Engle 2015 USDA/WS/National Wildlife Research Center

Influence Of Simulated Double-Crested Cormorant, Phalacrocorax Auritus, Predation On Multiple-Batch Production Of Channel Catfish, Ictalurus Punctatus, Brian S. Dorr, Carole R. Engle

Brian S Dorr

The double-crested cormorant, Phalacrocorax auritus, is considered the primary depredating bird species on commercially produced channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, in the southeastern USA. We simulated different levels of cormorant predation on losses at harvest and economic effects on channel catfish production in a multiple-batch cropping system. We observed significant (P<0.05) declines in catfish production at increasing levels of cormorant predation in this study. This decline was mitigated by increased individual growth of catfish at higher predation rates (i.e., lower catfish densities). This mitigating effect produced a non-linear relationship with total kg of catfish harvested per pond resulting in a non-linear incremental increase in breakeven price related to predation. Costs of production ($/kg) increased with increasing predation levels up to very high levels of predation with a cumulative maximum increase in breakeven price of $0.143/kg. These results indicate that losses at harvest due to cormorant predation occur immediately but are mitigated in part by compensatory growth of individual catfish. Losses due to cormorant predation in multi-batch systems can be considerable, but there is not a 1:1 relationship between losses and kg of catfish harvested due to compensatory actors.


The Characterization Of A Vital Wisconsin Waterway: A Biological Assessment Of The Lower Fox River From 2006-2014, Emily L. Kiehnau 2015 Lawrence University

The Characterization Of A Vital Wisconsin Waterway: A Biological Assessment Of The Lower Fox River From 2006-2014, Emily L. Kiehnau

Lawrence University Honors Projects

The Lower Fox River has historically been used as a navigational crossroads, a waste disposal system, and source of hydroelectric power. Over the years, heavy use of the river has negatively affected water quality and the overall health of the system. Unhealthy rivers cannot function properly. Biological assessment based on animal surveys are often used to determine river health. I used data from the Lawrence University and Fox River Navigational System Authority invasive species-monitoring project to explore how the distribution of animals in the Fox River has changed over time and across locations. Monitoring surveys have taken place between June ...


Microsatellite Analysis Of Population Structure In The Santa Ana Speckled Dace (Rhinicthys Osculus), Stacey A. Nerkowski 2015 California State University - San Bernardino

Microsatellite Analysis Of Population Structure In The Santa Ana Speckled Dace (Rhinicthys Osculus), Stacey A. Nerkowski

Electronic Theses, Projects, and Dissertations

Rhinichthys osculus, the Speckled Dace, is one of the most ubiquitous fish in western North America. Within the Southern California region, the local taxon is known as the Santa Ana Speckled Dace. The purpose of this study was to characterize and identify polymorphic microsatellite markers for R. osculus in which twenty-three were identified through Illumina pair-end sequencing. Seven of these loci were then used to examine the patterns of genetic variation and population structure that occurred within and among the watersheds in the Southern California. The study also examined the regional relationships among Southern California, Central California and Owen’s ...


Socio-Economic Instability And The Scaling Of Energy Use With Population Size, John P. DeLong, Oskar Burger 2015 University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Socio-Economic Instability And The Scaling Of Energy Use With Population Size, John P. Delong, Oskar Burger

Faculty Publications in the Biological Sciences

The size of the human population is relevant to the development of a sustainable world, yet the forces setting growth or declines in the human population are poorly understood. Generally, population growth rates depend on whether new individuals compete for the same energy (leading to Malthusian or density-dependent growth) or help to generate new energy (leading to exponential and super-exponential growth). It has been hypothesized that exponential and super-exponential growth in humans has resulted from carrying capacity, which is in part determined by energy availability, keeping pace with or exceeding the rate of population growth. We evaluated the relationship between ...


Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Flux In A Restored Tallgrass Prairie; Does Chamber Material Matter?, Peter L. McCollam 2015 DePaul University

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Flux In A Restored Tallgrass Prairie; Does Chamber Material Matter?, Peter L. Mccollam

DePaul Discoveries

Tallgrass prairie ecosystems play a vital role in the carbon cycle; their restoration may be an important component of mitigating future climate change. To quantify the biosphere-to-atmosphere exchange of greenhouse gases, enclosure based chamber systems are frequently used because they are simple and inexpensive to construct, and can be easily replicated in a variety of ecosystems. We tested for differences between paired PVC and galvanized steel chambers in methane, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide emissions within a restored prairie at Nachusa Grasslands in June and July 2014. We found that there were no significant differences between PVC and steel chambers ...


Predation In A Natural Community Of Marine Mollusks: Using Morphology To Determine Predator-Prey Ecology, Danielle N. Araiza, Erica Valdez 2015 DePaul University

Predation In A Natural Community Of Marine Mollusks: Using Morphology To Determine Predator-Prey Ecology, Danielle N. Araiza, Erica Valdez

DePaul Discoveries

Predatory gastropod mollusks in the family Naticidae feed on bivalve mollusks and leave distinctive markings in the form of countersunk circular boreholes on the shells. These boreholes possess both an inner borehole diameter (IBD) and an outer borehole diameter (OBD) which are proportional to the size of the predator. It has been proposed that the ratio of IBD to OBD can be used to identify predator species. Variation in the ratio of the IBD to OBD was examined in two prey species (Dwarf surf clam, Incongruous ark clam) collected from Otter Island beach in South Carolina to determine if clams ...


A Preliminary Study Of Soundscape Analysis As A Measurement Of Ecosystem Health, Veronica M. Jachowski, Lisa Kenny, Michelle Hauer, Andrew Kühn, Spencer Barrett 2015 DePaul University

A Preliminary Study Of Soundscape Analysis As A Measurement Of Ecosystem Health, Veronica M. Jachowski, Lisa Kenny, Michelle Hauer, Andrew Kühn, Spencer Barrett

DePaul Discoveries

In this study, acoustic ecology, the analysis of soundscapes -- composed of geophony, biophony, and anthrophony -- is applied as a potential measurement of ecosystem health. Recordings were taken from four locations in the greater Chicago area. By combining traditional ecological assessments including soil analysis, worm density surveys, and vegetation surveys, and correlating the results with acoustic data we highlight the value of soundscape analysis and suggest lines of future inquiry.


Restoration Of Native Biodiversity In Altered Environments: Reintroduction Of Atlantic Salmon Into Lake Ontario, Aimee Lee S. Houde 2015 The University of Western Ontario

Restoration Of Native Biodiversity In Altered Environments: Reintroduction Of Atlantic Salmon Into Lake Ontario, Aimee Lee S. Houde

University of Western Ontario - Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Less than a quarter of reintroduction programs have succeeded in re-establishing a self-sustaining population of an extirpated species. Optimal source population selection, based on an evolutionary perspective, could increase the fitness of translocated individuals, thereby improving the success rate of restoring extirpated populations. Here, using three source populations of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar (LaHave River, Sebago Lake, and Lac Saint-Jean), that are being used for reintroduction efforts into Lake Ontario, I examined two optimal source population selection approaches: environment matching and adaptive potential. For environment matching, source populations from locations containing similar key environment features as the reintroduction location should ...


Riparian Restoration, Success Criteria, And Application To The Bart Sabrecat Creek Riparian Restoration Project In Fremont, California, Jody D. Fessler 2015 University of San Francisco

Riparian Restoration, Success Criteria, And Application To The Bart Sabrecat Creek Riparian Restoration Project In Fremont, California, Jody D. Fessler

Master's Projects

Riparian restoration is a complex, inter-disciplinary field that is open to interpretation by its practitioners. This research reviews some of the critical elements of riparian restoration, including the watershed, surrounding land use, adjacent habitat, and riparian buffers; special-status species, endangered species, and habitat type and structure; invasive species control; water quality and hydrology; and soil and soil microbial communities. Three methods of evaluating restoration projects are discussed, including the Society for Ecological Restoration International Primer, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) California Salmonid Stream Habitat Restoration Manual and CDFW permitting, and the California Rapid Assessment Method. Finally, the ...


Nsf Grant Helps Preserve Parasite Collections [Press Release], Scott Gardner, Lelslie Reed 2015 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Nsf Grant Helps Preserve Parasite Collections [Press Release], Scott Gardner, Lelslie Reed

Scott Gardner Publications & Papers

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $500,000 grant that will allow four major parasite collections to be digitized. The collections are part of UNL's Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology. Scott Gardner (pictured) is the curator and director of the Manter Laboratory.

A $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation will allow the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology to digitally preserve four major collections of parasite specimens donated to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln during the past five years.


Effects Of Ecologically Realistic Heating Profiles On Feeding In The Intertidal Hermit Crab, Pagurus Sameulis, Paige Davis 2015 Chapman University

Effects Of Ecologically Realistic Heating Profiles On Feeding In The Intertidal Hermit Crab, Pagurus Sameulis, Paige Davis

Student Research Day Abstracts and Posters

The intertidal zone is an ideal habitat to investigate effects of global warming because species living in it are very close to their physiological limits. Initial studies of invertebrate physiological responses to heat stress have employed relatively abrupt increases in temperature. My research investigates effects of ecologically more realistic temperature profiles on feeding in the intertidal hermit crab, Pagurus sameulis. Recent work in the Wright lab showed that feeding in this species is inhibited by an abrupt increase in temperature. Because temperature change in the natural environment of Pagurus is much more gradual, I hypothesize that such a gradual temperature ...


Biological Degradation Of Acetaldehyde In Southern California Coastal Waters, Mary Senstad, Sovanndara Hok, Ori Barashy, Catherine D. Clark, Warren J. De Bruyn 2015 Chapman University

Biological Degradation Of Acetaldehyde In Southern California Coastal Waters, Mary Senstad, Sovanndara Hok, Ori Barashy, Catherine D. Clark, Warren J. De Bruyn

Student Research Day Abstracts and Posters

Oxygenated hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere with levels ranging from low ppt (acetaldehyde) to low ppb (methanol). As an OH sink and an atmospheric HOx and ozone source, oxygenated hydrocarbons have a direct impact on the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The oceans are one of the largest sources of uncertainty in current atmospheric budget estimates of these species. A better understanding of the processes that produce and destroy these species in seawater would improve our understanding of the role of the oceans in cycling these species into or out of the atmosphere. We have measured the degradation rate ...


Evaluation Of Temperature Anomalies And Ocean Productivity During The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake, Cora Byers, Brenna McNabb 2015 Chapman University

Evaluation Of Temperature Anomalies And Ocean Productivity During The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake, Cora Byers, Brenna Mcnabb

Student Research Day Abstracts and Posters

The oceanic productivity of the Indian Ocean and temperature anomalies prior to the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (MW =9.3) and tsunami (December 26th 2004) were studied. Data was obtained via NASA’s Giovanni program to determine the effect on phytoplankton (primary producers) and temperature changes over the region of the earthquake. Seasonal trends were visible in the concentrations of chlorophyll a, coccolithophores, cyanobacteria, chlorophytes, diatoms and absorption coefficient, in addition to storm trends.


Possible Precursor Events To Earthquakes And The Resulting Effects On Organic Material In The Surrounding Water Bodies, Kiyoko Nakatsui 2015 Chapman University

Possible Precursor Events To Earthquakes And The Resulting Effects On Organic Material In The Surrounding Water Bodies, Kiyoko Nakatsui

Student Research Day Abstracts and Posters

Being located on the “Ring of Fire” Japan experiences many seismic events. Adding to this, it is located at the convergence of four fault lines where seismic activity will be even more frequent and severe. Although small tremors occurring in an area are indicators of an earthquake to come it only gives minutes of warning. Scientists are now trying to see if latent heat and gas release from fault lines can indicate an earthquake to come with hours or even days of warning. MODIS aqua and terra data will be analyzed in order to see if such precursors can be ...


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