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Targeted Advertising, Platform Competition And Privacy, Henk L.M. Kox, Bas Straathof, Gijsbert Zwart 2017 KVL Economic Policy Research

Targeted Advertising, Platform Competition And Privacy, Henk L.M. Kox, Bas Straathof, Gijsbert Zwart

Henk LM Kox

Targeted advertising can benefit consumers through lower prices for access to websites. Yet, if consumers dislike that websites collect their personal information, their welfare may go down. We study competition for consumers between websites that can show targeted advertisements. We find that more targeting increases competition and reduces the websites’ profits, but yet in equilibrium websites choose maximum targeting as they cannot credibly commit to low targeting. A privacy protection policy can be beneficial for both consumers and websites. If consumers are heterogeneous in their concerns for privacy, a policy that allows choice between two levels of privacy will be ...


Contemplating Mindfulness At Work: An Integrative Review, Christopher Lyddy, Darren J. Good, Theresa M. Glomb, Joyce E. Bono, Kirk W. Brown, Michelle K. Duffy, Ruth A. Baer, Judson A. Brewer, Sara W. Lazar 2017 Providence College

Contemplating Mindfulness At Work: An Integrative Review, Christopher Lyddy, Darren J. Good, Theresa M. Glomb, Joyce E. Bono, Kirk W. Brown, Michelle K. Duffy, Ruth A. Baer, Judson A. Brewer, Sara W. Lazar

Christopher Lyddy

Mindfulness research activity is surging within organizational science. Emerging evidence across multiple fields suggests that mindfulness is fundamentally connected to many aspects of workplace functioning, but this knowledge base has not been systematically integrated to date. This review coalesces the burgeoning body of mindfulness scholarship into a framework to guide mainstream management research investigating a broad range of constructs. The framework identifies how mindfulness influences attention, with downstream effects on functional domains of cognition, emotion, behavior, and physiology. Ultimately, these domains impact key workplace outcomes, including performance, relationships, and well-being. Consideration of the evidence on mindfulness at work stimulates important ...


Improving Training Impact Through Effective Follow-Up: Techniques And Their Application, Harry J. Martin 2017 Cleveland State University

Improving Training Impact Through Effective Follow-Up: Techniques And Their Application, Harry J. Martin

Harry J. Martin

PURPOSE: This paper aims to describe a variety of cost-effective methods that employers can use to support training activities and promote the transfer of skills and knowledge to the workplace. These techniques work to positively impact the workplace environment through peer and supervisory support. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The application of action plans, performance assessment, peer meetings, supervisory consultations, and technical support is illustrated in two case examples. Findings ‐ Follow-up activities resulted in improved transfer and had positive quantitative and qualitative effects on operations and firm performance. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Billions of dollars are spent annually by organisations on employee training and ...


When Institutional Work Backfires: Organizational Control Of Professional Work In The Pharmaceutical Industry, Jagdip Singh, Rama K. Jayanti 2017 Case Western Reserve University

When Institutional Work Backfires: Organizational Control Of Professional Work In The Pharmaceutical Industry, Jagdip Singh, Rama K. Jayanti

Rama Jayanti

Integrating institutional and role theories, this paper develops a Logics–Roles– Action (LRA) framework for understanding how for-profit organizations structure institutional work to managerially control the work of professionals they employ. Structurally, this institutional work involves three elements: (1) internalizing pluralistic logics (logics); (2) institutionalizing distinct roles embedded in these logics (roles); and (3) scripting goal-oriented role enactment plans (action). An empirical examination of the LRA framework in the pharmaceutical industry evidences four distinct organizational strategies that script role enactments of sales professionals in their interactions with physicians. Each strategy is intended to reaffirm prevailing institutional logics, but eventually backfires ...


Mutually Assured Protection Among Large U.S. Law Firms, Tom Baker, Rick Swedloff 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Mutually Assured Protection Among Large U.S. Law Firms, Tom Baker, Rick Swedloff

Faculty Scholarship

Top law firms are notoriously competitive, fighting for prime clients and matters. But some of the most elite firms are also deeply cooperative, willingly sharing key details about their finances and strategy with their rivals. More surprisingly, they pay handsomely to do so. Nearly half of the AmLaw 100 and 200 belong to mutual insurance organizations that require member firms to provide capital; partner time; and important information about their governance, balance sheets, risk management, strategic plans, and malpractice liability. To answer why these firms do so when there are commercial insurers willing to provide coverage with fewer burdens, we ...


Antecedents And Consequences Of Procedural Fairness Perceptions In Personnel Selection: A Three-Year Longitudinal Study, Udo Konradt, Yvonne Garbers, Martina Böge, Berrin Erdogan, Talya N. Bauer 2017 Kiel University

Antecedents And Consequences Of Procedural Fairness Perceptions In Personnel Selection: A Three-Year Longitudinal Study, Udo Konradt, Yvonne Garbers, Martina Böge, Berrin Erdogan, Talya N. Bauer

Talya N. Bauer

Drawing on Gilliland’s (1993) selection fairness framework, we examined antecedents and behavioral effects of applicant procedural fairness perceptions before, during, and after a personnel selection procedure using a six-wave longitudinal research design. Results showed that both perceived post-test fairness and pre-feedback fairness perceptions are related to job offer acceptance and job performance after 18 months, but not to job performance after 36 months. Pre-test and post-test procedural fairness perceptions were mainly related to formal characteristics and interpersonal treatment, whereas pre-feedback fairness perceptions were related to formal characteristics and explanations. The impact of fairness attributes of formal characteristics and interpersonal ...


Improving Patient Safety Through High Reliability Organizations, Jared Padgett, Kenneth Gossett, Roger Mayer, Wen-Wen Chien, Freda Turner 2017 Pepperdine University School of Law

Improving Patient Safety Through High Reliability Organizations, Jared Padgett, Kenneth Gossett, Roger Mayer, Wen-Wen Chien, Freda Turner

The Qualitative Report

Preventable medical errors result in the loss of 200,000 lives per year with associated financial and operational burdens on organizations and society. Widespread preventable patient harm occurs despite increases in healthcare regulations. High reliability organization theory contributes to improved safety and may potentially reverse this trend. This single case study explored the introduction of a safety culture and subsequent improvements in patient safety in a reliability-seeking organization. Fourteen participants from a subacute nursing facility were selected using purposeful sampling criterion. Data were collected through participant interviews, document reviews, and group observation. Five themes emerged from an analysis of collected ...


Positive Impacts Of Social Media At Work: Job Satisfaction, Job Calling, And Facebook Use Among Co-Workers, Brittany Hanna, Kerk Kee, Brett W. Robertson 2017 Lieberman Research Worldwide

Positive Impacts Of Social Media At Work: Job Satisfaction, Job Calling, And Facebook Use Among Co-Workers, Brittany Hanna, Kerk Kee, Brett W. Robertson

Communication Faculty Articles and Research

The number of Facebook users grew rapidly since its conception. Within today’s workplace, employees are increasingly connecting with each other on Facebook for interpersonal reasons. Due to sensational reports by media outlets of inappropriate social media use, many organizations are taking extreme measures about how their employees who utilize Facebook to connect with colleagues. Contrary to the negative assumptions, McAfee [1] states that social media within the workplace can promote positive dynamics. The present study uses McAfee’s argument to examine if a positive connection exists between colleagues who use Facebook to connect with each other. An online survey ...


Sex Differences On Elementary Cognitive Tasks Despite No Differences On The Wonderlic Personnel Test, Bryan Pesta, S. Bertsch, Peter J. Poznanski, W.H. Bommer 2017 Cleveland State University

Sex Differences On Elementary Cognitive Tasks Despite No Differences On The Wonderlic Personnel Test, Bryan Pesta, S. Bertsch, Peter J. Poznanski, W.H. Bommer

Peter Poznanski

Whether males and females differ in general mental ability (GMA) remains an open question. Complicating the issue is that standardized IQ tests are constructed to minimize sex differences. We propose a potential solution whereby GMA is measured via performance on elementary cognitive tasks (ECTs). ECTs assess basic information-processing ability, yet correlate moderately highly with GMA. Toward this end, we had male (n = 218) and female (n = 226) undergraduates complete the Wonderlic Personnel Test (WPT), and two ECTs: inspection time (IT) and reaction time (RT). The sex difference on the WPT was non-significant (d = .17), but small differences favoring males existed ...


Black-White Differences On Iq And Grades: The Mediating Role Of Elementary Cognitive Tasks, Bryan Pesta, Peter J. Poznanski 2017 Cleveland State University

Black-White Differences On Iq And Grades: The Mediating Role Of Elementary Cognitive Tasks, Bryan Pesta, Peter J. Poznanski

Peter Poznanski

The relationship between IQ scores and elementary cognitive task (ECT) performance is well established, with variance on each largely reflecting the general factor of intelligence, or g. Also ubiquitous are Black-White mean differences on IQ and measures of academic success, like grade point average (GPA). Given C. Spearman's (Spearman, C. (1927). The Abilities of Man. New York: Macmillan) hypothesis that group differences vary directly with a test's g loading, we explored whether ECT performance could mediate Black-White IQ and GPA differences. Undergraduates (139 White and 40 Black) completed the Wonderlic Personnel Test, followed by inspection time and choice ...


Sex Differences On Elementary Cognitive Tasks Despite No Differences On The Wonderlic Personnel Test, Bryan Pesta, S. Bertsch, Peter J. Poznanski, W.H. Bommer 2017 Cleveland State University

Sex Differences On Elementary Cognitive Tasks Despite No Differences On The Wonderlic Personnel Test, Bryan Pesta, S. Bertsch, Peter J. Poznanski, W.H. Bommer

Peter Poznanski

Whether males and females differ in general mental ability (GMA) remains an open question. Complicating the issue is that standardized IQ tests are constructed to minimize sex differences. We propose a potential solution whereby GMA is measured via performance on elementary cognitive tasks (ECTs). ECTs assess basic information-processing ability, yet correlate moderately highly with GMA. Toward this end, we had male (n = 218) and female (n = 226) undergraduates complete the Wonderlic Personnel Test (WPT), and two ECTs: inspection time (IT) and reaction time (RT). The sex difference on the WPT was non-significant (d = .17), but small differences favoring males existed ...


The Inspection Time And Over-Claiming Tasks As Predictors Of Mba Student Performance, Bryan Pesta, Peter J. Poznanski 2017 Cleveland State University

The Inspection Time And Over-Claiming Tasks As Predictors Of Mba Student Performance, Bryan Pesta, Peter J. Poznanski

Peter Poznanski

Elementary cognitive tasks (ECTs) are typically used in laboratory settings for basic research on the structure of intelligence. More recently, ECTs have been shown to predict important educational and clinical outcomes. Here we found that ECTs possess both criterion and incremental validity over IQ and the graduate management admission test (GMAT) as predictors of (N = 116) MBA student grades and scores on a capstone exam. Validity coefficients for the ECTs ranged from 0.24 to 0.50. A median split on an ECT component showed that the best-performing ECT group had substantially higher grades, exam scores, IQs and GMAT scores ...


Black-White Differences On Iq And Grades: The Mediating Role Of Elementary Cognitive Tasks, Bryan Pesta, Peter J. Poznanski 2017 Cleveland State University

Black-White Differences On Iq And Grades: The Mediating Role Of Elementary Cognitive Tasks, Bryan Pesta, Peter J. Poznanski

Peter Poznanski

The relationship between IQ scores and elementary cognitive task (ECT) performance is well established, with variance on each largely reflecting the general factor of intelligence, or g. Also ubiquitous are Black-White mean differences on IQ and measures of academic success, like grade point average (GPA). Given C. Spearman's (Spearman, C. (1927). The Abilities of Man. New York: Macmillan) hypothesis that group differences vary directly with a test's g loading, we explored whether ECT performance could mediate Black-White IQ and GPA differences. Undergraduates (139 White and 40 Black) completed the Wonderlic Personnel Test, followed by inspection time and choice ...


Nonverbal Emotion Recognition And Performance: Differences Matter Differently, William H. Bommer, Bryan J. Pesta, Susan F. Storrud-Barnes 2017 Cleveland State University

Nonverbal Emotion Recognition And Performance: Differences Matter Differently, William H. Bommer, Bryan J. Pesta, Susan F. Storrud-Barnes

Susan Storrud-Barnes

PURPOSE: This paper aims to explore and test the relationship between emotion recognition skill and assessment center performance after controlling for both general mental ability (GMA) and conscientiousness. It also seeks to test whether participant sex or race moderated these relationships. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Using independent observers as raters, the paper tested 528 business students participating in a managerial assessment center, while they performed four distinct activities of: an in‐basket task; a team meeting for an executive hiring decision; a team meeting to discuss customer service initiatives; and an individual speech.FINDINGS: Emotion recognition predicted assessment center performance uniquely ...


Emotion Management Ability: Predicting Task Performance, Citizenship, And Deviance, Donald H. Kluemper, Timothy DeGroot, Sungwon Choi 2017 Cleveland State University

Emotion Management Ability: Predicting Task Performance, Citizenship, And Deviance, Donald H. Kluemper, Timothy Degroot, Sungwon Choi

Timothy DeGroot

This article examines emotion management ability (EMA) as a theoretically relevant predictor of job performance. The authors argue that EMA predicts task performance, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), and workplace deviance behavior. Moreover, to be practically meaningful, managing emotions should predict these important organizational outcomes after accounting for the effects of general mental ability and the Big Five personality traits. Two studies of job incumbents show that EMA consistently demonstrates incremental validity and is the strongest relative predictor of task performance, individually directed OCB, and individually directed and objectively measured deviance.


Does Talking The Talk Help Walking The Walk? An Examination Of The Effect Of Vocal Attractiveness In Leader Effectiveness , Timothy DeGroot, Federico Aime, Scott G. Johnson, Donald Kluemper 2017 Cleveland State University

Does Talking The Talk Help Walking The Walk? An Examination Of The Effect Of Vocal Attractiveness In Leader Effectiveness , Timothy Degroot, Federico Aime, Scott G. Johnson, Donald Kluemper

Timothy DeGroot

The authors tested the hypothesis that leaders' vocal attractiveness is positively related to perceptions of leadership effectiveness. In a first study using vocal spectral analysis on a sample of U.S. presidents and Canadian prime ministers, vocal attractiveness accounted for significant variance in historians' perceptions of leadership effectiveness (β = .35, p < .05), explaining an additional 12% of the variance above that explained by personality, motives, and charisma. A second study of 255 subjects distributed into 85 teams in a laboratory setting found similar results for the relationship between vocal attractiveness and perceptions of leadership effectiveness. The second study also supported the hypothesis that personal reactions mediate the relationship between vocal attractiveness and perceptions of leadership effectiveness. In contrast, vocal attractiveness and personal reactions were found to have no significant effects on leadership effectiveness outcomes.


The Role Of Political Skill In The Stressor–Outcome Relationship: Differential Predictions For Self- And Other-Reports Of Political Skill, James A. Meurs, Vickie C. Gallagher, Pamela L. Perrewé 2017 Cleveland State University

The Role Of Political Skill In The Stressor–Outcome Relationship: Differential Predictions For Self- And Other-Reports Of Political Skill, James A. Meurs, Vickie C. Gallagher, Pamela L. Perrewé

Vickie Gallagher

The beneficial role of political skill in stress reactions and performance evaluations has been demonstrated in a substantial amount of empirical research. Most of the research, however, has focused on self-perceptions of political skill. This study examines the differential moderating effects of self- vs. other-rated political skill in the conflict – emotional burnout and performance relationships, using two samples including non-academic staff employees of a large university (N = 839) and a variety of office and retail employees from an automotive organization (N = 142). We argue that self-reported political skill moderates the relationship between conflict and a self-reported strain-related outcome that is ...


The Glass Is Half Full: The Positive Effects Of Organizational Identification For Employees Higher In Negative Affectivity, Jason Stoner, Vickie C. Gallagher 2017 Cleveland State University

The Glass Is Half Full: The Positive Effects Of Organizational Identification For Employees Higher In Negative Affectivity, Jason Stoner, Vickie C. Gallagher

Vickie Gallagher

Organizational identification has traditionally been associated with positive organizational outcomes, whereas negative affectivity (NA) has most often been associated with negative individual outcomes. We hypothesize that organizational identification will positively influence self-reported performance for individuals high in NA. Conversely, individuals low in NA will not experience feelings of enhanced performance as organizational identification increases. The findings from 2 samples provided support for the research hypothesis; specifically, the personality factor of NA moderated the organizational-identification/self-reported performance relationship. We discuss our findings in light of important implications for the positive psychology movement and practicing managers.


Managing Resources And Need For Cognition: Impact On Depressed Mood At Work, Vickie Coleman Gallagher 2017 Cleveland State University

Managing Resources And Need For Cognition: Impact On Depressed Mood At Work, Vickie Coleman Gallagher

Vickie Gallagher

Conservation of resources (COR) theory posits that people strive to retain and protect valued resources and that multiple resources are preferred to aid coping (Hobfoll & Shirom, 2000). I examine the interaction of two resources – need for cognition (NFC) and ability to manage resources – and their interactive effects on depressed mood at work (DMW). Results support my predictions that individuals high in both (NFC and ability to manage resources) reported lower levels of DMW. I discuss the strengths, limitations, and directions for future research.


Profile Of Corporate Social Media Consumer Segments, Beverly Wright, Aberdeen Leila Borders, Paul H. Schwager, S. Scott Nadler 2017 Georgia Institute of Technology

Profile Of Corporate Social Media Consumer Segments, Beverly Wright, Aberdeen Leila Borders, Paul H. Schwager, S. Scott Nadler

Aberdeen L Borders

The trade and academic literature is replete with commentary about the need for companies to develop promotional strategies and to adopt media platforms that are more engaging and conversational with customers than the traditional top-down company directed one-way communication strategies of the past (Thomas, Peters, Howell and Robbins, 2012; Foster, West and Francescucci 2011; Deighton and Kornfeld, 2009). This viewpoint is supported by Christodoulides (2008) who reported that many customers view information about a company or brand that they obtained from blogs, social networking sites and the like as being more relevant, believable and important to them in their interactions ...


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