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New Census Reflects Growing U.S. Population Diversity, With Children In The Forefront, Kenneth M. Johnson 2021 University of New Hampshire

New Census Reflects Growing U.S. Population Diversity, With Children In The Forefront, Kenneth M. Johnson

The Carsey School of Public Policy at the Scholars' Repository

In this brief, author Kenneth Johnson reports that the U.S. population grew by a modest 7.4 percent during the past decade to 331.4 million in April 2020. Yet, there was significant variation in the rate and direction of population change among the numerous racial and Hispanic origin groups that together represent the U.S. population. The net result was a significant increase in racial diversity over the course of the decade, both in the population as a whole, and children in particular. Diversity was geographically widespread and increased in every region of the country.

The nation’s ...


Older Adult Vaccination Rates Lag In Rural Areas And The South, Claire Pendergrast, Yue Sun 2021 Syracuse University

Older Adult Vaccination Rates Lag In Rural Areas And The South, Claire Pendergrast, Yue Sun

Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion: Population Health Research Brief Series

Older adults face especially severe health risks from COVID-19 compared to other age groups. Getting vaccinated is the most effective way for older adults to reduce their risk of serious illness or death. This brief examines geographic trends in COVID-19 vaccination rates for adults age 65+. The authors find that older adult vaccination rates are low in rural areas and especially low in the South.


Latinos In Massachusetts: Fall River, Phillip Granberry, Vishakha Agarwal 2021 University of Massachusetts Boston

Latinos In Massachusetts: Fall River, Phillip Granberry, Vishakha Agarwal

Gastón Institute Publications

Fall River is home to 9,420 Latinos according to the 2015-2019 American Community Survey. They represent 11% of the city’s population (Figure 1)—the same percentage that Latinos constitute in the state’s overall population. Fall River is geographically located in the SouthCoast region, which has a relatively small share of Latinos (7%). The city is majority non-Latino White (77%), with Blacks making up 5% and Asians 2% of the city’s population.


Latinos In Massachusetts: New Bedford, Phillip Granberry, Vishakha Agarwal 2021 University of Massachusetts Boston

Latinos In Massachusetts: New Bedford, Phillip Granberry, Vishakha Agarwal

Gastón Institute Publications

New Bedford is home to 19,826 Latinos according to the 2015-2019 American Community Survey. As Figure 1 shows, they represent 21% of the city’s population, nearly twice the Latino share of the state's overall population. New Bedford is geographically located in the South Coast region, which has a relatively small share of Latinos (7%). The city is majority White (60%), with Blacks making up 6% and Asians 2% of the city’s population.


Family Change And Variation Through The Lens Of Family Configurations In Low- And Middle-Income Countries, Andrés Felipe Castro Torres, Luca Maria Pesando, Hans-Peter Kohler, Frank F. Furstenberg 2021 Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research

Family Change And Variation Through The Lens Of Family Configurations In Low- And Middle-Income Countries, Andrés Felipe Castro Torres, Luca Maria Pesando, Hans-Peter Kohler, Frank F. Furstenberg

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

Using 254 Demographic and Health Surveys from 75 low- and middle-income countries, this study shows how the joint examination of family characteristics across rural and urban areas provides new insights for understanding global family change. We operationalize this approach by building family configurations: a set of interrelated features that describe different patterns of family formation and structure. These features include partnership (marriage/unions) regimes and their stability, gender relations, household composition, and reproduction. Factorial and clustering techniques allow us to summarize these family features into three factorial axes and six discrete family configurations. We provide an in-depth description of these ...


Why Are Covid-19 Vaccination Rates Lower In Rural Than In Urban Areas Of The U.S.?, Shannon M. Monnat, Yue Sun 2021 Syracuse University

Why Are Covid-19 Vaccination Rates Lower In Rural Than In Urban Areas Of The U.S.?, Shannon M. Monnat, Yue Sun

Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion: Population Health Research Brief Series

Achieving high vaccination coverage is the best way to prevent coronavirus spread, but COVID-19 vaccination rates vary substantially across the U.S. This brief compares COVID-19 vaccination rates across the U.S. rural-urban continuum and identifies the major contributors to lower rates of vaccination in rural counties. The authors find that higher Trump vote share in the 2020 Presidential election and lower educational attainment collectively explain lower rural vaccination rates.


What Predicts How Safe People Feel In Their Neighborhoods And Does It Depend On Functional Status?, Alfredo A. Velasquez, Jason A. Douglas, Fangqi Guo, Jennifer W. Robinette 2021 Chapman University

What Predicts How Safe People Feel In Their Neighborhoods And Does It Depend On Functional Status?, Alfredo A. Velasquez, Jason A. Douglas, Fangqi Guo, Jennifer W. Robinette

Health Sciences and Kinesiology Faculty Articles

Feeling unsafe in one's neighborhood is related to poor health. Features of the neighborhood environment have been suggested to inform perceptions of neighborhood safety. Yet, the relative contribution of these features (e.g., uneven sidewalks, crime, perceived neighborhood physical disorder) on perceived neighborhood safety, particularly among people with disabilities who may view themselves as more vulnerable, is not well understood. We examined whether sidewalk quality assessed by third party raters, county-level crime rates, and perceived neighborhood disorder would relate to neighborhood safety concerns, and whether functional limitations would exacerbate these links. Using data from the 2012/2014 waves of ...


Inequities In Job Recovery During The Covid-19 Pandemic: A Year Later, Rogelio Saenz, Corey Sparks, Asiya Validova 2021 University of Texas at San Antonio

Inequities In Job Recovery During The Covid-19 Pandemic: A Year Later, Rogelio Saenz, Corey Sparks, Asiya Validova

The Carsey School of Public Policy at the Scholars' Repository

In this brief, authors Rogelio Sáenz, Corey Sparks, and Asiya Validova report that in April 2020, after the first two months of significant spread of COVID-19 in the United States, nearly 25 million fewer people had a job. In June 2021, there were still 5.9 million fewer people employed, representing a drop of 3.7 percent in workers since before COVID. Workers of color, women, and those with lower levels of education have consistently had the highest unemployment rates, a trend that persisted through June 2021.

The recovery of the workforce has not been equal, with dramatic differences based ...


Heterogenous Trajectories In Physical, Mental And Cognitive Health Among Older Americans: Roles Of Genetics And Earlier Ses, Cung Truong Hoang, Vikesh Amin, Jere R. Behrman, Hans-Peter Kohler, Iliana V. Kohler 2021 University of Pennsylvania

Heterogenous Trajectories In Physical, Mental And Cognitive Health Among Older Americans: Roles Of Genetics And Earlier Ses, Cung Truong Hoang, Vikesh Amin, Jere R. Behrman, Hans-Peter Kohler, Iliana V. Kohler

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

We investigate the roles of genetic predispositions, childhood SES and adult schooling attainment in shaping trajectories for three important components of the overall health and wellbeing of older adults -- BMI, depressive symptoms and cognition. We use the Health & Retirement Study (HRS) and group-based trajectory modelling (GBTM) to identify subgroups of people who share the same underlying trajectories over ages 50-94 years. After identifying common underlying trajectories, we use fractional multinomial logit models to estimate associations of (1) polygenic scores for BMI, depression, ever-smoked, education, cognition and subjective wellbeing, (2) childhood SES and (3) schooling attainment on the probabilities of trajectory ...


Latinos In Massachusetts: Boston, Phillip Granberry, Phillip Granberry, Vishakha Agarwal 2021 University of Massachusetts Boston

Latinos In Massachusetts: Boston, Phillip Granberry, Phillip Granberry, Vishakha Agarwal

Gastón Institute Publications

As the largest city in the Commonwealth, Boston is home to an estimated 135,757 Latinos. This is the largest Latino population in the state, though in several smaller cities (Lawrence, Chelsea, and Holyoke for example) Latinos make up larger shares of their population. In Boston, Latinos represent about one-fifth of the city’s population, a smaller share than for Whites and Blacks but a greater share than for Asians. The Latino share in Boston is also larger than Latinos' statewide share, which is 11%.


Latinos In Massachusetts: Brockton, Phillip Granberry, Vishakha Agarwal 2021 University of Massachusetts Boston

Latinos In Massachusetts: Brockton, Phillip Granberry, Vishakha Agarwal

Gastón Institute Publications

The city of Brockton, Massachusetts has a population of 95,594 residents, of whom 10,601 or 11% are Latino, according to the 2015-2019 American Community Survey. Black residents constitute the largest share (44%), followed by Whites (31%0. The Latino share in Brockton is almost exactly the same as Latinos' statewide share, which is 11%. Brockton has a large “other” population, which makes up 12% of the city’s population. This group is largely made up of Cabo Verdeans. With only 2% of the population, the Asian group will be omitted from the individual characteristics of the report. This ...


The State Of The Unions 2021: A Profile Of Organized Labor In New York City, New York State, And The United States, Ruth Milkman, Stephanie Luce 2021 CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies

The State Of The Unions 2021: A Profile Of Organized Labor In New York City, New York State, And The United States, Ruth Milkman, Stephanie Luce

Publications and Research

The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting lockdowns generated vast job losses across the United States. The New York City metropolitan area, where the pandemic’s impact was felt earlier than elsewhere in the country, suffered severe job losses in 2020. The decline in employment among women workers was greater than among men — in sharp contrast to the Great Recession, which hit men’s employment harder. The State of the Unions 2021, A Profile of Organized Labor in New York City, New York State, and the United States, presents data on gender, union membership, and job losses in the COVID-19 economic ...


Parental Educational Similarity And Infant Health In Chile: Evidence From Administrative Records, 1990-2015, Alejandra Abufhele, Andrés Felipe Castro Torres, Luca Maria Pesando 2021 Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Parental Educational Similarity And Infant Health In Chile: Evidence From Administrative Records, 1990-2015, Alejandra Abufhele, Andrés Felipe Castro Torres, Luca Maria Pesando

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

This study expands existing scholarship on the relationship between parental educational similarity and children’s birth outcomes using rich administrative data from Chile covering births that occurred between 1990 and 2015. We assess the applicability of the homogamy-benefit hypothesis – whereby parental educational similarity (educational homogamy) is beneficial for children’s outcomes – by testing the relationship between parental educational homogamy and two measures of infant health, namely low birth weight (LBW) and preterm birth (PB). We show that parental educational homogamy is associated with a reduced probability of low birth weight and preterm birth – particularly at the high end of the ...


Latinos In Massachusetts: Revere, Phillip Granberry, Vishakha Agarwal 2021 University of Massachusetts Boston

Latinos In Massachusetts: Revere, Phillip Granberry, Vishakha Agarwal

Gastón Institute Publications

As the second largest city in Suffolk County, Revere’s population in the 2015-2019 American Community Survey is 53,692. The city is home to an estimated 18,042 Latinos, who are the second largest ethno-racial group and make up 34% of the city’s population. Whites are the largest population (53%), and the city has smaller Black (5.0%), Asian (4.9%), and Other (3%) populations.


Is Teaching Skills For Independent Living To Disabled Adults Associated With Change In Self-Determination?, Craig Ravesloot Ph.D., University of Montana Rural Institute 2021 RTC:Rural

Is Teaching Skills For Independent Living To Disabled Adults Associated With Change In Self-Determination?, Craig Ravesloot Ph.D., University Of Montana Rural Institute

Independent Living and Community Participation

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of teaching people with disabilities independent living skills on the basic human needs specified in Self-Determination Theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000). Nine Centers for Independent Living (CILs) recruited 160 disabled adults with disabilities to participate in weekly group sessions to go through the Community Living Skills curriculum (CLS). The CLS curriculum includes 10 sessions that cover basic independent living skills. Groups of participants met weekly to go through the curriculum with a CIL staff member trained in workshop facilitation. We used the Basic Needs Satisfaction General Scale (Gagne, 2003) to assess ...


Otoliths Of South-Western Australian Fish: A Photographic Catalogue, Chris Dowling, Kim Smith, Elaine Lek, Joshua Brown 2021 DPIRD

Otoliths Of South-Western Australian Fish: A Photographic Catalogue, Chris Dowling, Kim Smith, Elaine Lek, Joshua Brown

Fisheries research reports

Due to the species-specific nature of otoliths and given they are often the only part of the fish preserved when fish die, otolith catalogues can be used in numerous applications, such as diet studies in fish eating animals, including pinnipeds, fish and sea birds; archaeological purposes such as reconstructing indigenous people’s diets from otoliths found in middens or evolutionary history of fish species by comparing fossilized otoliths. Given the unique mixture of subtropical and temperate fish, including many endemic species that occur off the southwest corner of WA having a catalogue for this area is extremely important for people ...


Remarkably Ordinary, An Oral History:
 Examining The Micro Effects Of Family Reunification On The Lee Siblings And Their Spouses, Carol Joo Lee 2021 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Remarkably Ordinary, An Oral History:
 Examining The Micro Effects Of Family Reunification On The Lee Siblings And Their Spouses, Carol Joo Lee

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Family reunification accounts for a majority of entry mechanisms by which current Korean immigrants arrived in the U.S. The peak Korean immigration period from the mid-1970s to the late 1980s saw a dwindling of skill-based immigration and a rapid increase of immigrants who arrived through family preferences as a direct result of the Immigration Act of 1965. Despite there being ample studies and aggregate data on the post-1965 immigrants from Korea, not enough micro-level research has been conducted on the ways in which the family reunification provisions affected individuals, their brothers and sisters, and the inter-family dynamic both prior ...


Should I Stay Or Should I Go? Mexican Return Migration Across The Life Course, Mara G. Sheftel 2021 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Should I Stay Or Should I Go? Mexican Return Migration Across The Life Course, Mara G. Sheftel

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Foreign-born individuals make up a growing share of older adults in the US. Older immigrants offer an important vantage point from which to investigate integration because outcomes at older ages can be considered “final” measures providing empirical evidence for theoretical understandings of the forces impacting immigrant trajectories. However, considering the non-negligible portion of immigrants that ultimately return to their country of origin it is impossible to get the full range of immigrant outcomes without considering returnees. Further, patterns of return may differ across the life course with distinct economic, social, and health considerations at older ages. However, the impact of ...


Senior Center Response To Covid-19: Nutrition, Ceara Somerville, Saralyn Collins, Caitlin Coyle, Jan Mutchler, Center for Social and Demographic Research on Aging, University of Massachusetts Boston 2021 University of Massachusetts Boston

Senior Center Response To Covid-19: Nutrition, Ceara Somerville, Saralyn Collins, Caitlin Coyle, Jan Mutchler, Center For Social And Demographic Research On Aging, University Of Massachusetts Boston

Center for Social and Demographic Research on Aging Publications

Older adults across the U.S. are at risk of malnutrition, which can have lasting effects on health. Councils on Aging (COAs) are at the forefront of meeting the nutritional needs of older adults in their communities. The COVID-19 pandemic has not only limited older adults’ access to food, but it has also affected COAs’ abilities to get nutritious food out to seniors. Despite the hurdles presented by the global pandemic, Massachusetts COAs have continued their efforts to meet the nutritional needs of older adults.


Senior Center Response To Covid-19: Social Engagement And Outreach, Ceara Somerville, Saralyn Collins, Caitlin Coyle, Jan Mutchler, Center for Social and Demographic Research on Aging, University of Massachusetts Boston 2021 University of Massachusetts Boston

Senior Center Response To Covid-19: Social Engagement And Outreach, Ceara Somerville, Saralyn Collins, Caitlin Coyle, Jan Mutchler, Center For Social And Demographic Research On Aging, University Of Massachusetts Boston

Center for Social and Demographic Research on Aging Publications

Social isolation can have devastating effects on an individual’s mental and physical wellbeing. The COVID-19 outbreak has put older adults at greater risk of isolation and has pushed efforts to address isolation to the forefront of public health in Massachusetts. Senior centers have been working to end isolation in their communities long before COVID-19 and have continued that work in the face of a global pandemic. This fact sheet describes what Massachusetts senior centers are doing during the pandemic to address isolation among older community members.


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