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The Minero Magazine, Volume Xxiv, Spring 2017, UTEP Student Publications 2017 University of Texas at El Paso

The Minero Magazine, Volume Xxiv, Spring 2017, Utep Student Publications

The Prospector

Cover Story: How the Other Side Lives


Spartan Daily, February 23, 2017, San Jose State University, School of Journalism and Mass Communications 2017 San Jose State University

Spartan Daily, February 23, 2017, San Jose State University, School Of Journalism And Mass Communications

Spartan Daily, 2017

Volume 148, Issue 13


Pseudo Newsgathering: Analyzing Journalists’ Use Of Pseudo-Events On 'The Wire', Patrick Ferrucci, Chad Painter 2017 University of Colorado

Pseudo Newsgathering: Analyzing Journalists’ Use Of Pseudo-Events On 'The Wire', Patrick Ferrucci, Chad Painter

Chad Painter

This textual analysis examines the role of pseudo-events in the newsgathering process depicted on season five of The Wire. The researchers found that the press and sources construct “reality”; sources present “masks” to conceal “reality”' and journalists acknowledge the absurdity of pseudo-events but cover staged events as genuine news. The overriding conclusion is that journalists fail citizens by constructing a false reality through a negotiation with powerful sources who are media- savvy enough to control depictions. These findings are then interpreted through the lens of cultivation theory.


Alternative Media And Normative Theory: A Case Of Ferguson, Missouri, Mark Anthony Poepsel, Chad Painter 2017 Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Alternative Media And Normative Theory: A Case Of Ferguson, Missouri, Mark Anthony Poepsel, Chad Painter

Chad Painter

This paper, based on in-depth interviews with journalists at alternative and advocacy papers in St. Louis as well as interviews with live streaming protestors, a new breed of citizen journalist, applies six characteristics commonly associated with the alternative press to coverage of the protests and police crackdown in Ferguson, Missouri, between August 9, 2014, and March 2015. Journalists from the alternative newspaper in St. Louis focused on progressive or radical values less than the literature predicted. The African-American newspaper in St. Louis found itself influencing the national and global agenda regarding Ferguson and the ongoing oppression of blacks in the ...


Spartan Daily, February 22, 2017, San Jose State University, School of Journalism and Mass Communications 2017 San Jose State University

Spartan Daily, February 22, 2017, San Jose State University, School Of Journalism And Mass Communications

Spartan Daily, 2017

Volume 148, Issue 12


Spartan Daily, February 21, 2017, San Jose State University, School of Journalism and Mass Communications 2017 San Jose State University

Spartan Daily, February 21, 2017, San Jose State University, School Of Journalism And Mass Communications

Spartan Daily, 2017

Volume 148, Issue 11


Public Reaction To Mandated Language For U.S. Drinking Water Quality Reports, Branden B. Johnson 2017 University of New Hampshire

Public Reaction To Mandated Language For U.S. Drinking Water Quality Reports, Branden B. Johnson

RISK: Health, Safety & Environment

The author discusses results of a survey evaluating the mandated language for United States drinking water quality reports.


Spartan Daily, February 16, 2017, San Jose State University, School of Journalism and Mass Communications 2017 San Jose State University

Spartan Daily, February 16, 2017, San Jose State University, School Of Journalism And Mass Communications

Spartan Daily, 2017

Volume 148, Issue 10


Spartan Daily, February 15, 2017, San Jose State University, School of Journalism and Mass Communications 2017 San Jose State University

Spartan Daily, February 15, 2017, San Jose State University, School Of Journalism And Mass Communications

Spartan Daily, 2017

Volume 148, Issue 9


Spartan Daily, February 14, 2017, San Jose State University, School of Journalism and Mass Communications 2017 San Jose State University

Spartan Daily, February 14, 2017, San Jose State University, School Of Journalism And Mass Communications

Spartan Daily, 2017

Volume 148, Issue 8


Politics In 140 Characters Or Less: Social Media Sites As A Platform For Political Discussion, Jamie Brackpool 2017 Wilfrid Laurier University

Politics In 140 Characters Or Less: Social Media Sites As A Platform For Political Discussion, Jamie Brackpool

Laurier Undergraduate Journal of the Arts

No abstract provided.


Spartan Daily, February 9, 2017, San Jose State University, School of Journalism and Mass Communications 2017 San Jose State University

Spartan Daily, February 9, 2017, San Jose State University, School Of Journalism And Mass Communications

Spartan Daily, 2017

Volume 148, Issue 7


Spartan Daily, February 8, 2017, San Jose State University, School of Journalism and Mass Communications 2017 San Jose State University

Spartan Daily, February 8, 2017, San Jose State University, School Of Journalism And Mass Communications

Spartan Daily, 2017

Volume 148, Issue 6


Call For Manuscripts, Joseph P. Mazer 2017 Clemson University

Call For Manuscripts, Joseph P. Mazer

Basic Communication Course Annual

Submissions are invited for publication consideration in Volume 30 of the Basic Communication Course Annual (2018). Managed by the Basic Course Division of the National Communication Association and published by the University of Dayton, the Annual publishes the best scholarship available on topics related to the basic course and is distributed nationally to scholars and educators interested in the basic communication course. Each article will be published online and indexed on the journal’s website.

All manuscripts submitted to the Annual will undergo blind peer review. Two or three members of the editorial board read and review each manuscript. The ...


Centering Information Literacy (As) Skills And Civic Engagement In The Basic Communication Course: An Integrated Course Library Collaboration, Liliana Herakova, Jennifer Bonnet, Mark Congdon Jr. 2017 University of Maine

Centering Information Literacy (As) Skills And Civic Engagement In The Basic Communication Course: An Integrated Course Library Collaboration, Liliana Herakova, Jennifer Bonnet, Mark Congdon Jr.

Basic Communication Course Annual

In an era of proliferating “fake news” stories (Fisher, Cox, & Herman, 2016; Mikkelson, 2016; Rutenberg, 2016; Tavernise, 2016), and a “post-truth” political climate (Higgins, 2016; Oxford Dictionaries, 2016), the need to pair public communication and civil discourse with information literacy instruction is more important than ever. A recent study by researchers at Stanford University revealed an alarming trend among students from middle school to college: while students at various stages of their formative education may have a facility with social media use and Internet navigation, they are easily deceived when asked to determine if the information they have read online is reliable ...


Embracing Social Media In The Basic Communication Course: Recommendations For The Digital Age, Soo-Kwang Oh, Jennifer S. Owlett 2017 William Paterson University

Embracing Social Media In The Basic Communication Course: Recommendations For The Digital Age, Soo-Kwang Oh, Jennifer S. Owlett

Basic Communication Course Annual

For communication scholars, the “bread and butter” (Dance, 2002), or “front porch” (Beebe, 2013), of the discipline is the basic course. The basic course is “that communication course either required or recommended for a significant number of undergraduates; that course which the department has, or would recommend as a requirement for all or most undergraduates” (Morreale, Hanna, Berko, & Gibson, 1999, p. 3). Most departments provide either a public speaking or hybrid course as their basic course (Valenzano, Wallace, & Morreale, 2014). Part of maintaining this “porch” is understanding what adaptations are needed. The basic communication course has undergone several transformations since ...


Universal Adaptation: The Need To Enhance Accessibility In The Basic Course, Michael G. Strawser, Brandi N. Frisby, Renee Kaufmann 2017 Bellarmine University

Universal Adaptation: The Need To Enhance Accessibility In The Basic Course, Michael G. Strawser, Brandi N. Frisby, Renee Kaufmann

Basic Communication Course Annual

It is well-documented that the basic course is the front porch of the communication discipline (Beebe, 2013). Regularly part of general education, the basic course introduces students who may never experience another communication course to communication-based content. Because of the prominence of the basic course in general education, the scope of participating students is vast in terms of motivation and ability. This varied population may present several challenges for basic course instructors. One oft-forgotten issue, or an afterthought in course design, is the development and implementation of accessible basic course delivery and materials for students with disabilities. We believe it ...


Adapting The Basic Communication Course For A Globally And Technologically Mediated 21st-Century Context, Michael G. Strawser, Janet K. McCormick 2017 Bellarmine University

Adapting The Basic Communication Course For A Globally And Technologically Mediated 21st-Century Context, Michael G. Strawser, Janet K. Mccormick

Basic Communication Course Annual

The global marketplace is ripe for a reiteration (or a reminder) of the characteristics of an effective international communicator. Thankfully, the basic course, the “front porch” of the communication discipline (Beebe, 2013), may serve as a catalyst for pinpointed transcultural communication skills training. As communication knowledge and skills training increases in domestic and global importance (Morreale, Myers, Backlund, & Simonds, 2016), it is imperative that the basic communication course adapts to meet the demands of an international job market for communication practitioners. As such, this forum piece will address desirable international professional communication behavior and position a revised basic course outlook ...


Capitalizing On The Inevitable: Adapting To Mobile Technology In The Basic Communication Course, Brandi N. Frisby 2017 University of Kentucky

Capitalizing On The Inevitable: Adapting To Mobile Technology In The Basic Communication Course, Brandi N. Frisby

Basic Communication Course Annual

It is undeniable that college classrooms have evolved. Students are reliant on, and connected to, friends, family, and endless amounts of information through convenient, affordable, and mobile technology (Kuznekoff & Tisworth, 2013). Although Wei and Leung (1999) reported students found classrooms to be the least acceptable public place for cell phone use, this has not deterred the classroom from becoming “deeply saturated” by mobile devices (Kuznekoff, Munz, & Titsworth, 2015, p. 344). Instructors report technology challenges their “beliefs about the nature of learning and their role in the classroom” (Fairchild, Meiners, & Violette, 2016, p. 99). Despite student and faculty perceptions about technology in classroom, Burns and Lohenry (2010) found 94% of students owned a cell phone and Elder (2013) reported that an astounding 99% of students admitted using their cell phones during class with the average student using his or her cell phone between 3 and 7 times per class (Duncan, Hoekstra, & Wilcox, 2012). Instructor reactions to mobile technology have often manifested as anger and annoyance characterized by statements about students’ disrespect, sense of entitlement, incivility, and has resulted in technology policies and outright prohibition (Burns & Lohenry, 2010; Campbell, 2006). As “one of the biggest challenges that instructors face,” it is critical to facilitate a discussion about ways to adapt to this challenge (Kuznekoff et al., 2015, p. 344).


Basic Course Forum: Section Introduction, 2017 University of Dayton

Basic Course Forum: Section Introduction

Basic Communication Course Annual

The Basic Course Forum is designed to invite scholars and basic course practitioners to propose and debate specific key questions of concern related to the basic course. The 2016 topic is “Adaptation.” Submissions address how the basic course has in the past adapted to changing demands or in the future can adapt thusly. In crafting the essays, authors were asked to focus on one demand or constraint that either has, does, or likely will influence the delivery and/or content of the basic course. They were asked to explain the constraint, how it is tied to the basic course, and ...


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