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A Multiperiod Consensus-Based Transactive Energy System For Unbalanced Distribution Networks, Rui Cheng, Leigh Tesfatsion, Zhaoyu Wang 2021 Iowa State University

A Multiperiod Consensus-Based Transactive Energy System For Unbalanced Distribution Networks, Rui Cheng, Leigh Tesfatsion, Zhaoyu Wang

Economics Working Papers

This study develops a consensus-based transactive energy system design managed by an independent distribution system operator (DSO) for an unbalanced radial distribution network. The network is populated by welfare-maximizing customers with price-sensitive and fixed (non-price-sensitive) demands who make multiple successive power decisions during each real-time operating period OP. The DSO and customers engage in an iterative negotiation process in advance of each OP to determine retail price-to-go sequences for OP that align customer power decisions with network reliability constraints in a manner that respects customer privacy. The convergence properties of a dual decomposition algorithm developed to implement this negotiation process ...


Forest Stories, Victoria Bearden, Nate Berger, Kristen Cooney, Peter Scuderi 2021 Ursinus College

Forest Stories, Victoria Bearden, Nate Berger, Kristen Cooney, Peter Scuderi

Environmental Studies Presentations

In the fall semester, the Forests and People class examined diverse human-forest interactions and how people find value within these ecosystems. To apply the lessons learned in class, student teams conducted four separate in-depth interviews with individuals who reside or work in forested areas to examine how these individuals define their relationship to local forests. The interview format encouraged open, personalized engagement between students and speakers, focusing on identifying ecological values and their importance in shaping forest management. This presentation focuses on an ARCgis storymap production composed of two selected interviews with individuals in western Oregon. One interview evaluated the ...


Exploration Of The Food Forest Outreach Team, Victoria Bearden 2021 Ursinus College

Exploration Of The Food Forest Outreach Team, Victoria Bearden

Environmental Studies Presentations

At Whittaker Environmental Research Station, the first iteration of the Ursinus Food Forest was planted in 2019. The Ursinus Food Forest includes over 15 species of edible species and embraces lessons in urban agriculture, urban forestry, and agroforestry. The site has now been planted for over a year, and is monitored by Dr. Patrick Hurley, student researchers, and Ursinus facilities. There are two separate student research teams involved with the food forest, one focusing on stewardship of the site and the other focusing on outreach for the site. The goal of the outreach team is to build a community around ...


The Effect Of Changing Substrate On Arctic Aquatic Invertebrates Abundance, Tom Dolman 2021 University of Maine at Farmington

The Effect Of Changing Substrate On Arctic Aquatic Invertebrates Abundance, Tom Dolman

Michael D. Wilson Symposium

Climate change is directly affecting tundra ecosystems in northern regions, and warming temperatures have caused discontinuous permafrost and thawing sediments across the region. This project investigates how increasing erosion and the foraging patterns of migratory snow geese may degrade habitat for aquatic invertebrates in the upper Mast River, located in Wapusk National Park, Manitoba, Canada. In the past two decades, many of the important species of aquatic invertebrates have shown declines. Declining invertebrate populations are predicted to affect aquatic ecosystems and decrease the resources available to shorebirds and waterfowl, which breed and migrate through this area.


The Use Of Mayflies, Stoneflies And Caddisflies As Indicators Of Fine Sediment Pollution In Salmon-Bearing Streams Of The Pacific Northwest, Cory Michael McCaffrey 2021 Portland State University

The Use Of Mayflies, Stoneflies And Caddisflies As Indicators Of Fine Sediment Pollution In Salmon-Bearing Streams Of The Pacific Northwest, Cory Michael Mccaffrey

Dissertations and Theses

Fine sediment (particles < 2 mm in diameter) deposition is a natural component of streams but in excess amounts it is harmful to aquatic biota. Fine sediment is the main cause of impairment in streams and rivers of the Pacific Northwest and it can lead to unsuitable spawning and rearing habitat for Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed Salmon and steelhead. From a regulatory perspective, fine sediment presents a challenge because it is difficult to measure in situ and to establish criteria that would indicate stream impairment. Consequently, there is considerable effort to develop biocriteria using stream macroinvertebrates that would help regulators determine if a stream is impaired by excessive fine sediment. Stream macroinvertebrates are widely used to monitor and assess stream degradation because they are affected by the physical, chemical and biological conditions in a stream. In particular, the stream insects known as mayflies (Ephemeroptera, E), stoneflies (Plecoptera, P) and caddisflies (Trichoptera, T) are commonly used as a metric referred to as EPT richness. EPT taxa are well known as pollutant intolerant insects and EPT richness in known to respond negatively to stream degradation. While the sensitivity of EPT to changing water chemistry, increased land use, and hydrologic alteration has been well established, the use of EPT as biocriteria to monitor fine sediment conditions in streams has not been fully evaluated. Studies on the relationship between EPT and fine sediment have shown mixed results, which is likely due to the challenges of quantifying fine sediment in streams. For example, many studies use reach-scale pebble-counts to quantify sediments and reach-scale macroinvertebrate samples to characterize their condition, but the processes that drive macroinvertebrate-sediment relationships primarily operate at the patch-scale. Another issue is the incomplete sediment gradient often observed in the randomized, reach-scale study designs frequently used to collect stream data for regulatory purposes. The purpose of my thesis is to address the use of stream macroinvertebrates as indicators of excessive fine sediment in the regulatory setting. Specifically, I evaluated which aspect of the macroinvertebrate community should be used as an indicator for fine sediment, explored methods for better characterizing benthic fine sediment at the patch-scale and conducted a spatially oriented study that contained a fine sediment gradient. I accomplished this by: 1) using Random Forest and generalized linear models (GLM) to explore relationships between environmental variables, macroinvertebrate metrics and fine sediment in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), 2) developing and validating a novel methodology that quantifies macroinvertebrates and fine sediment at the patch-scale, and 3) designing and conducting a field study in the John Day Basin that included a relatively complete gradient of fine sediment conditions. The results of the exploratory analysis of the PNW data showed that EPT richness and percent EPT richness had the strongest association with fine sediment (model percent variance explained = 42.6% -- 44.5%). Important environmental predictors of EPT richness included percent fine sediment cover, conductivity, chloride, canopy cover and fast-water habitat. Generalized linear models with EPT richness as the response variable and the same environmental predictor variables showed similar results (Pseudo R2 = 0.43 -- 0.50). Using the novel patch-scale sediment sampling methodology, I found that mass of fines and percent of fines was significantly and negatively correlated with velocity (rho = - 0.78, p < 0.001 and rho = -0.52, p < 0.05, respectively). Percent EPT richness exhibited significant and positive correlations with velocity (rho = 0.87, p < 0.001) and a significant and negative correlation with mass of fines (rho = - 0.70, p < 0.01). Non-erosional samples exhibited stronger relationships between velocity and mass of fines (rho = -0.85, p < 0.01) than erosional sampling locations (rho = 0.20, p > 0.05). Results of the John Day study showed that EPT richness was strongly related to fine sediment mass and also positively related to orthophosphate (Pseudo R2 = 0.82). EPT richness decreased 12% between zero and seven percent fine sediment cover but increased between 8% and 10% fine sediment cover. When compared to data collected using a traditional reach-scale approach, the John Day study ...


Data On The Effects Of Persuasive Message Content On Retweet Counts During Natural Hazard Events, Yajie Li, Amanda L. Hughes, Peter D. Howe 2021 Utah State University

Data On The Effects Of Persuasive Message Content On Retweet Counts During Natural Hazard Events, Yajie Li, Amanda L. Hughes, Peter D. Howe

Browse all Datasets

This dataset contains Twitter messages about heat hazards posted by U.S. National Weather Service accounts in 2016. The dataset also contains the retweet counts of the heat-related tweets and whether several types of persuasive message content were included in each tweet. The population and temperature for the forecast area of each sending National Weather Service account are also included.


Development Of Mine Soils In A Chronosequence Of Forestry-Reclaimed Sites In Eastern Kentucky, Kenton L. Sena, Kevin M. Yeager, Christopher D. Barton, John M. Lhotka, William E. Bond, Kimberly J. Schindler 2021 University of Kentucky

Development Of Mine Soils In A Chronosequence Of Forestry-Reclaimed Sites In Eastern Kentucky, Kenton L. Sena, Kevin M. Yeager, Christopher D. Barton, John M. Lhotka, William E. Bond, Kimberly J. Schindler

Lewis Honors College Faculty Publications

Surface mining for coal has contributed to widespread deforestation and soil loss in coal mining regions around the world, and particularly in Appalachia, USA. Mined land reforestation is of interest in this and other regions where forests are the dominant pre-mining land use. This study evaluated mine soil development on surface-mined sites reforested according to the Forestry Reclamation Approach, representing a chronosequence of time ranging from 0 to 19 years after reclamation. Soils were sampled in depth increments to 50 cm and analyzed for a suite of soil physical and chemical characteristics. Overall, soil fines (silt + clay) tended to increase ...


Biochar-Swine Manure Impact On Soil Nutrients And Carbon Under Controlled Leaching Experiment Using A Midwestern Mollisols, Chumki Banik, Jacek A. Koziel, Mriganka De, Darcy Bonds, Baitong Chen, Asheesh K. Singh, Mark A. Licht 2021 Iowa State University

Biochar-Swine Manure Impact On Soil Nutrients And Carbon Under Controlled Leaching Experiment Using A Midwestern Mollisols, Chumki Banik, Jacek A. Koziel, Mriganka De, Darcy Bonds, Baitong Chen, Asheesh K. Singh, Mark A. Licht

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Biochar application to the soil can improve soil quality and nutrient leaching loss from swine manure adapted soils. Our working hypothesis was that the biochar-incubated with manure could be a better soil amendment than conventional manure application. The manure-biochar application to the soil would decrease nutrient leaching from manure and increase plant-available nutrients. The study objectives were to 1) assess the physicochemical properties of the manure-biochar mixture after lab incubation and 2) evaluate the impact of biochar-treated swine manure on soil total C, N, and other major and minor nutrients in comparison to conventional manure application to soil. Three biochars ...


Tournament And Non-Tournament Anglers Have Little Effect On A Largemouth Bass Population Compared To Natural Mortality, Andrea Sylvia, Stephen J. Dinsmore, Michael J. Weber 2021 Iowa State University

Tournament And Non-Tournament Anglers Have Little Effect On A Largemouth Bass Population Compared To Natural Mortality, Andrea Sylvia, Stephen J. Dinsmore, Michael J. Weber

Natural Resource Ecology and Management Publications

Popularity of bass Micropterus spp. catch and release and tournament angling during the past decade has resulted in increased potential for these activities to induce population level effects. Understanding capture rates and mortality sources relative to total population mortality is essential to focus of management. We conducted monthly electrofishing, solicited nontournament angler tag returns, and censused largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides tournaments at Brushy Creek Lake, IA, USA from April 2015 to June 2018. We used a multistate mark-recapture model to evaluate the effects of air temperature, water temperature, tournament bass per angler, and tournament initial mortality on non-tournament and tournament ...


Reaction Intensity Partitioning: A New Perspective Of The National Fire Danger Rating System Energy Release Component, Francis M. Fujioka, David R. Weise, Shyh-Chin Chen, Seung Hee Kim, Menas C. Kafatos 2021 Chapman University

Reaction Intensity Partitioning: A New Perspective Of The National Fire Danger Rating System Energy Release Component, Francis M. Fujioka, David R. Weise, Shyh-Chin Chen, Seung Hee Kim, Menas C. Kafatos

Mathematics, Physics, and Computer Science Faculty Articles and Research

The Rothermel fire spread model provides the scientific basis for the US National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) and several other important fire management applications. This study proposes a new perspective of the model that partitions the reaction intensity function and Energy Release Component (ERC) equations as an alternative that simplifies calculations while providing more insight into the temporal variability of the energy release component of fire danger. We compare the theoretical maximum reaction intensities and corresponding ERCs across 1978, 1988 and 2016 NFDRS fuel models as they are currently computed and as they would be computed under the proposed ...


Environmental Health - The Impact Of Oil Sands Mining On Peatland Ecosystems In Alberta, Canada, Melanie A. Vile 2021 West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Environmental Health - The Impact Of Oil Sands Mining On Peatland Ecosystems In Alberta, Canada, Melanie A. Vile

Sustainability Research & Practice Seminar Presentations

No abstract provided.


Ancient Great Wall Building Materials Reveal Paleoenvironmental Changes In Northwestern China, Robert Patalano, Jing Hu, Qin Leng, Weiguo Liu, Huanye Wang, Patrick Roberts, Michael Storozum, Lin Yang, Hong Yang 2021 Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Ancient Great Wall Building Materials Reveal Paleoenvironmental Changes In Northwestern China, Robert Patalano, Jing Hu, Qin Leng, Weiguo Liu, Huanye Wang, Patrick Roberts, Michael Storozum, Lin Yang, Hong Yang

Science and Technology Faculty Journal Articles

Plant material used in the construction of segments and beacon towers of the ancient Great Wall in northwestern China contain untapped potential for revealing paleoenvironmental conditions. Here, we characterize the molecular preservation and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of common reeds (Phragmites) collected from Great Wall fascines dated to the Han Dynasty in today’s Gansu and Xinjiang provinces using a combination of chromatographic techniques and isotope analyses. Our data demonstrates that ancient reeds were harvested from local habitats that were more diverse than exist today. The isotope data also capture differential rates of environmental deterioration along the eastern ...


Do Tropical Storms Have An Effect On Water Quality In Nacogdoches?, Emmie Schubert, Breanna Duran, Jaqui Murguia, Amy Rambo, Paige Graham 2021 Stephen F Austin State University

Do Tropical Storms Have An Effect On Water Quality In Nacogdoches?, Emmie Schubert, Breanna Duran, Jaqui Murguia, Amy Rambo, Paige Graham

Undergraduate Research Conference

The purpose of this research was to determine the effects tropical storms had on the water quality of water in Nacogdoches. This research investigated if rainwater distributed during the storms affected the levels of pH, nitrate, nitrite, phosphorous, alkalinity, turbidity, and total dissolved solids (TDS). Sampling was conducted on three water bodies before and after the storms. Measurements were taken with LaMotte kit to measure alkalinity, turbidity tube to measure turbidity, Colorimeter to test the nutrient levels, and Multi-Parameter Tester to measure TDS and pH. The results showed that Laura had a greater impact than Beta. Tropical storms are unforeseeable ...


Drought-Induced Biomass Burning As A Source Of Black Carbon To The Central Himalaya Since 1781 Ce As Reconstructed From The Dasuopu Ice Core, Joel D. Barker, Susan Kaspari, Paulo Gabrielli, Anna Wegner, Emilie Beaudon, M. Roxana Sierra-Hernández, Lonnie Thompson 2021 The Ohio State University

Drought-Induced Biomass Burning As A Source Of Black Carbon To The Central Himalaya Since 1781 Ce As Reconstructed From The Dasuopu Ice Core, Joel D. Barker, Susan Kaspari, Paulo Gabrielli, Anna Wegner, Emilie Beaudon, M. Roxana Sierra-Hernández, Lonnie Thompson

Geological Sciences Faculty Scholarship

Himalayan glaciers are melting due to atmospheric warming, with the potential to limit access to water for more than 25 % of the global population that resides in these glacier meltwater catchments. Black carbon has been implicated as a factor that is contributing to Himalayan glacier melt, but its sources and mechanisms of delivery to the Himalayas remain controversial. Here, we provide a 211-year ice core record spanning 1781–1992 CE for refractory black carbon (rBC) deposition from the Dasuopu glacier ice core that has to date provided the highest-elevation ice core record (7200 m). We report an average rBC concentration ...


The Amungme And The Environment: Environmental Justice History And Consumerism, Kole A. Dawson 2021 Boise State University

The Amungme And The Environment: Environmental Justice History And Consumerism, Kole A. Dawson

Phi Alpha Theta Pacific Northwest Regional Conference

The Amungme are one of hundreds of Papuan people groups who lived in the Indonesian province in New Guinea for thousands of years. This group subsisted in their environment by hunting, cultivation of small crops, and practicing pig husbandry. In the late 1960s, seeking foreign capital to boost the nation’s economy, the president of Indonesia signed a contract with Freeport McMoRan Copper and Gold. Freeport began mining in the early 1970s, eventually opening one of the world’s largest gold mines. Excavating sacred Amungme sites, Freeport’s massive pollution to the land and water destroyed the indigenous people’s ...


Can’T Bear It! Employing Culturally Sensitive Initiatives To Reduce Bear Bile Demand In Northern Vietnam, Alicia Ngo, Shannon Randolph 2021 Harvey Mudd College

Can’T Bear It! Employing Culturally Sensitive Initiatives To Reduce Bear Bile Demand In Northern Vietnam, Alicia Ngo, Shannon Randolph

EnviroLab Asia

Over the past 30 years, the combination of over-hunting, habitat loss, and increased bear bile demand has caused significant declines in Asiatic black bear (aka moon bear; Ursus thibetanus) and sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) populations. In Eastern medicine, bear bile is extracted from the gallbladders of bears and is then used to treat a wide range of inflammatory, liver, and degenerative ailments. However, the use of bear bile has had significant impacts on bear populations. Given that communities in Northern Vietnam have a lengthy history of using bear bile and bear bile is easily accessible, merely advocating for wildlife conservation ...


Mitigation Of Acute Ammonia Emissions With Biochar During Swine Manure Agitation Before Pump-Out: Proof-Of-The-Concept, Baitong Chen, Jacek A. Koziel, Andrzej Białowiec, Myeongseong Lee, Hantian Ma, Samuel C. O'Brien, Peiyang Li, Zhanibek Meiirkhanuly, Robert C. Brown 2021 Iowa State University

Mitigation Of Acute Ammonia Emissions With Biochar During Swine Manure Agitation Before Pump-Out: Proof-Of-The-Concept, Baitong Chen, Jacek A. Koziel, Andrzej Białowiec, Myeongseong Lee, Hantian Ma, Samuel C. O'Brien, Peiyang Li, Zhanibek Meiirkhanuly, Robert C. Brown

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Ammonia (NH3) emissions from animal agriculture can cause eutrophication of water ecosystems and are precursors to secondary particulate matter (PM2.5). NH3 emissions from stored swine manure represent nutrient loss affecting the fertilizing value of manure. The short-term emission bursts occur when farmers agitate manure before emptying storage and fertilizing fields. There is no proven technology to mitigate gaseous emissions during agitation, while the hazards of acute releases (e.g., H2S) are well-known. Biochar mitigates NH3 emissions from manure over the long-term. The objective of this research was to evaluate the mitigation of acute NH3 emissions during/after agitation. Two ...


Impact Of Whitetail Deer Overpopulation With Hunting On The Decline, Matthew J. Lamprinos 2021 Kutztown University

Impact Of Whitetail Deer Overpopulation With Hunting On The Decline, Matthew J. Lamprinos

English Department: Research for Change - Wicked Problems in Our World

The whitetail deer is a key species for Pennsylvania’s forests, but their ecological balance has been disturbed by unregulated growth and urban sprawl. The deer population in Pennsylvania has exploded since the 1880’s causing a wide range of damage on the ecosystem, and humans. To reduce deer populations to sustainable levels, the Pennsylvania Game Commission relies heavily on hunters to dedicate time in the fall to go out and fill the tags the they issue. Hunter participation all around the world is decreasing for a variety of reasons. Fewer hunters out in the field causes revenue losses for ...


Using Enclosed Y-Mazes To Assess Chemosensory Behavior In Reptiles, M. Rockwell Parker, Andrea F. Currylow, Eric A. Tillman, Charlotte J. Robinson, Jilian M. Josimovich, Isabella M.G. Bukovich, Lauren A. Nazarian, Melia G. Nafus, Bryan M. Kluever, Amy A. Yackel Adams 2021 James Madison University

Using Enclosed Y-Mazes To Assess Chemosensory Behavior In Reptiles, M. Rockwell Parker, Andrea F. Currylow, Eric A. Tillman, Charlotte J. Robinson, Jilian M. Josimovich, Isabella M.G. Bukovich, Lauren A. Nazarian, Melia G. Nafus, Bryan M. Kluever, Amy A. Yackel Adams

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Reptiles utilize a variety of environmental cues to inform and drive animal behavior such as chemical scent trails produced by food or conspecifics. Decrypting the scent-trailing behavior of vertebrates, particularly invasive species, enables the discovery of cues that induce exploratory behavior and can aid in the development of valuable basic and applied biological tools. However, pinpointing behaviors dominantly driven by chemical cues versus other competing environmental cues can be challenging. Y-mazes are common tools used in animal behavior research that allow quantification of vertebrate chemosensory behavior across a range of taxa. By reducing external stimuli, Y-mazes remove confounding factors and ...


Creating Community Connections On & Off Campus: Ramcorps, Shannon Gillespie, Nick Marcil, McKenna Kovatch 2021 West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Creating Community Connections On & Off Campus: Ramcorps, Shannon Gillespie, Nick Marcil, Mckenna Kovatch

Sustainability Research & Practice Seminar Presentations

No abstract provided.


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