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Under Pressure: The Nonpartisan League In South Central Minnesota, Jonathan Soucek 2017 Minnesota State University, Mankato

Under Pressure: The Nonpartisan League In South Central Minnesota, Jonathan Soucek

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

The Nonpartisan League attempted to enter Minnesota politics in 1918, with Charles Lindbergh, Sr. as the League-endorsed candidate for governor in the Republican primaries. As the League moved into Minnesota in 1917, it hoped to achieve the same success it had in North Dakota. Unfortunately, the United States entered World War I in April of 1917 as the Nonpartisan League began to organize in Minnesota. The League opposed America’s entry into the war, but supported the war effort when the United States declared war on Germany. League opponents and much of the general public, however, labeled the Nonpartisan League ...


The Black Press In Minnesota During World War I, Alejandra Galvan 2017 Minnesota State University Mankato

The Black Press In Minnesota During World War I, Alejandra Galvan

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

April 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the United States entering World War I. Many enjoy learning about the battles, the military, and the Homefront. But there is a need for more scholarship to understand the role African Americans played in the war. From my research, many African Americans disagreed with US involvement. Why would a country agree to fight for democracy overseas when its citizens need freedom at home? Racism in the United States concerned African Americans deeply. At the same time, however, African Americans viewed World War I as a way to demonstrate their patriotism. Black citizens ...


Helm Collection (Mss 616), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2017 Western Kentucky University

Helm Collection (Mss 616), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 616. Research used to compile the genealogicalwork Moses Helm [Nashville: Bob Law, 1995] by Robert Cornwell “Bob” Law and Clyde Smith. Included are photocopies of material from genealogical sources, photographs, clippings, narratives, and correspondence with descendants of Moses Helm (b. ca. 1710) and his wife Sarah Jameson (1711?-1812).


Mybarrio: Emigdio Vasquez And Chicana/O Identity In Orange County, Natalie Lawler, Denise Johnson, Marcus Herse, Jessica Bocinski, Manon Wogahn 2017 Chapman University

Mybarrio: Emigdio Vasquez And Chicana/O Identity In Orange County, Natalie Lawler, Denise Johnson, Marcus Herse, Jessica Bocinski, Manon Wogahn

Exhibition Catalogs

"Emigdio Vasquez created artwork that challenged Orange County’s more prominent narrative of wealthy beachside neighborhoods. He painted the brown bodies and brown histories that defined our earliest communities and economy... Vasquez produced much of the local art history that Orange County should be known for and should protect. It is with this perspective that Chapman University is proud to present the exhibition, My Barrio: Emigdio Vasquez and Chicana/o Identity in Orange County, in conjunction with the Getty Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative. We hope to initiate discourse not only about Vasquez’s prolific career, but also about ...


The Politics Of Shorter Hours And Corporate-Centered Society: A History Of Work-Time Regulation In The United States And Japan, Keisuke Jinno 2017 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

The Politics Of Shorter Hours And Corporate-Centered Society: A History Of Work-Time Regulation In The United States And Japan, Keisuke Jinno

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Shorter working hours drew much attention as a means of fighting unemployment and crisis in capitalism during the first half of the twentieth century. Nowadays, shorter work-time is rarely considered a policy option to fix economic or social issues in the United States and Japan. This dissertation presents a history of work-time regulation in the United States and Japan to examine how and why its developments and stalemate took place.

In the big picture, developments of work-time regulation during the first half of the twentieth century were a part of concessional modifications of class relations, a common phenomenon in many ...


Never Forgets: Traumatic Trace Within Public Space, Jan Descartes 2017 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Never Forgets: Traumatic Trace Within Public Space, Jan Descartes

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This paper will interrogate the ways in which ephemera from events affects the human and non- human environment and how the absence, manipulation or presence of traumatic trace weaves itself into the atmosphere of the past, present and future. It will look at space and the ways that trace manifests itself in hierarchal spaces and Lebbeus Woods’ concept of heterarchial spaces, which are organic and/or horizontally organized. A thread throughout is the question that if trace from trauma can exist in the visual field, i.e. the physical or digital landscape, in a way that maintains a discourse without ...


Identity Behind Glass: The Second Gore Place Greenhouse, Sean P. Romo 2017 University of Massachusetts Boston

Identity Behind Glass: The Second Gore Place Greenhouse, Sean P. Romo

Graduate Masters Theses

This thesis examines the second greenhouse at Gore Place, a historic country estate in Waltham, Massachusetts. Gore Place was owned by and named for Christopher and Rebecca Gore, members of the 18th- and 19th-century political and economic elite in New England. The greenhouse was constructed in 1806, and excavation at the site took place in 2004, 2008, and 2012. The latter two projects were data recovery excavations, which exposed portions of the greenhouse’s foundations and interior, as well as several features in the yard surrounding the building. Historic greenhouses were prestigious structures, financially accessible only to institutions, governments, and ...


Frontiersmen Settlers & Catle Rustlers: Pease Stories, Carol Steinhauer 2017 Central Washington University

Frontiersmen Settlers & Catle Rustlers: Pease Stories, Carol Steinhauer

Works by Local Authors

Carol Steinhauer traces the Pease family back through nine generations. Frontiersmen Settlers & Catle Rustlers: Pease Stories includes photographs, historical details, and family legends.


Revisiting Fredericksburg: Using Provocation To Explore New Questions, Jonathan Tracey 2017 Gettysburg College

Revisiting Fredericksburg: Using Provocation To Explore New Questions, Jonathan Tracey

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

To Freeman Tilden, provocation was an essential ingredient to effective interpretation, and I tend to agree with that idea. Both my walking tour at the Fredericksburg Battlefield Visitor Center and the interpretive exhibits at Chatham Manor utilize provocation in different forms, with different challenges and opportunities. Overall, the atmosphere of Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park is one that supports and encourages provocative thinking by visitors.


Provocation Through Accessibility At Special Collections At Musselman Library, Chloe Parrella 2017 Gettysburg College

Provocation Through Accessibility At Special Collections At Musselman Library, Chloe Parrella

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Gettysburg College Special Collections is a place where the worlds of archiving, preservation, and interpretation intersect. In the climate-controlled stacks, shelves lined with volume after volume attest to the centuries of history that the college has witnessed. It is the role of the current staff and interns to disseminate the seemingly infinite artifacts, manuscripts, and other primary sources that come through the door to those who travel to Special Collections to learn, discover, and enrich themselves. As Freeman Tilden wrote, “Information, as such, is not interpretation. Interpretation is revelation based upon information”. However, interpretation is not something that should be ...


In Gettysburg, The Confederacy Won, Scott Hancock 2017 Gettysburg College

In Gettysburg, The Confederacy Won, Scott Hancock

Africana Studies Faculty Publications

Almost every day, I ride my bicycle past some of the over 1,300 statues and monuments commemorating the Civil War in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, where I live. They are everywhere. None of them are of black people.

The Battle of Gettysburg, fought over three days in July of 1863, is often considered the turning point of a war fought over the fate of slavery in America. Black people ultimately were the reason why over 165,000 soldiers came to this Pennsylvania town in the first place. But on the battlefield, as far as the physical memorials, they disappear. (excerpt)


Understanding The Essex Junto: Fear, Dissent, And Propaganda In The Early Republic, Dinah Mayo-Bobee 2017 East Tennessee State University

Understanding The Essex Junto: Fear, Dissent, And Propaganda In The Early Republic, Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Historians have never formed a consensus over the Essex Junto. In fact, though often associated with New England Federalists, propagandists evoked the Junto long after the Federalist Party’s demise in 1824. This article chronicles uses of the term Essex Junto and its significance as it evolved from the early republic through the 1840s.


Book Review Of Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams And The Grand Strategy Of The Republic By Charles N. Edel, Dinah Mayo-Bobee 2017 East Tennessee State University

Book Review Of Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams And The Grand Strategy Of The Republic By Charles N. Edel, Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Charles N. Edel, a professor at the US Naval War College, demonstrates why John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) remains one of the most fascinating figures in US history. Although interpreting Adams's political actions through the lens of nationalism is not unusual, Edel's biography manages to provide a fresh look at Adams as secretary of state (1817-1825), president (1825- 1829), and Massachusetts representative in the US Congress (1831-1848).


Book Review Of Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter Of Monticello: Her Life And Times By Cynthia A. Kierner, Dinah Mayo-Bobee 2017 East Tennessee State University

Book Review Of Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter Of Monticello: Her Life And Times By Cynthia A. Kierner, Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Dinah Mayo-Bobee

In recent years, historians have broadened our knowledge of early US history by providing glimpses into the public and personal lives of historical women. A new addition to this body of work is Cynthia A. Kierner's biography on Martha Jefferson Randolph (1772-1836).


Book Review Of A Companion To James Madison And James Monroe, Dinah Mayo-Bobee 2017 East Tennessee State University

Book Review Of A Companion To James Madison And James Monroe, Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Excerpt: In this new anthology, editor Stuart Leibiger of La Salle University has compiled thirty-two essays that explore the lives and often overlapping careers of Virginians James Madison and James Monroe.


Farley, Seth Thomas, Jr., 1817-1999 (Mss 617), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2017 Western Kentucky University

Farley, Seth Thomas, Jr., 1817-1999 (Mss 617), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 617. Correspondence, documents, news clippings and ephemera from Seth Thomas Farley, Jr., a life-long educator. This collection includes a good deal of information about Farley’s teaching career prior to his work as a professor at WKU, his involvement in organizations that fought alcoholism and gambling (particularly the lottery in Kentucky), his church work, and his service on a committee to choose a federal magistrate for the western district of Kentucky. The collection includes an entire box of assessment related material related to Fort Knox Dependent Schools in the mid-1960s.


Fall 2017 Report On "Portrait Of A Collector", Meg Miner 2017 Illinois Wesleyan University

Fall 2017 Report On "Portrait Of A Collector", Meg Miner

Meg Miner

The four final products (a collection of interviews with people who knew Myers, two essays, and one peer reviewed article) comprised in the 2016 sabbatical project on Minor Myers, jr. are described here. An explanation of works planned but not completed is also available.


Concord’S Wayside: Home Of What?, Olivia Ortman 2017 Gettysburg College

Concord’S Wayside: Home Of What?, Olivia Ortman

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

This summer, I have had the privilege of interning at Minute Man NHP in Concord, Massachusetts. My primary station here is the Wayside: Home of Authors. Right about now, you might be wondering what the Wayside is. That’s alright, I didn’t know what the house was until just this summer. The Wayside was the home of Louisa May Alcott, Nathanial Hawthorne, and Harriet Lothrop (or Margaret Sydney) – all prominent authors in the 19th century. This house also stood witness to the “shot heard round the world” and provided brief shelter to a fugitive slave. This house is a ...


End Of Paragraph, Rowan Cahill 2017 University of Wollongong

End Of Paragraph, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

A tribute to the life and work of US journalist, author, soldier, script writer, leftist activist, Clancy Sigal (1926-2017), with particular reference to his novel/memoir Going Away (1962).


Choosing Your Battles: Provoking The Public At Fredericksburg And Spotsylvania National Military Park, Abby M. Currier 2017 Gettysburg College

Choosing Your Battles: Provoking The Public At Fredericksburg And Spotsylvania National Military Park, Abby M. Currier

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

During training to be an intern at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, our instructors continuously stressed the importance of reading our audience. Whether we were greeting visitors at the front desk or leading walking tours, our job was to always watch the visitors and gauge what they are interested in. For me, this was initially very frustrating. I prefer to deal with concrete things instead of making judgement calls. It all sounded pretty wishy washy and that I would somehow ‘know’ what the visitor wanted just by looking at them. Needless to say, I was not convinced.


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