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Race And British Colonialism In Southeast Asia, 1770-1870 John Crawfurd And The Politics Of Equality, Gareth Knapman 2016 Australian National University

Race And British Colonialism In Southeast Asia, 1770-1870 John Crawfurd And The Politics Of Equality, Gareth Knapman

Gareth Knapman

The idea of "race" played an increasing role in nineteenth-century British colonial thought. For most of the nineteenth century, John Crawfurd towered over British colonial policy in South-East Asia, being not only a colonial administrator, journalist and professional lobbyist, but also one of the key racial theorists in the British Empire. He approached colonialism as a radical liberal, proposing universal voting for all races in British colonies and believing all races should have equal legal rights. Yet at the same time, he also believed that races represented distinct species of people, who were unrelated. This book charts the development of ...


Our Lady, Queen Of Undecidable Propositions, Hugh C. Culik 2016 None

Our Lady, Queen Of Undecidable Propositions, Hugh C. Culik

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

Boundary systems take many forms: personal, historical, mathematical, and in the case of an elderly Jesuit and a young mathematician, a struggle to identify the larger boundary that both connects them and provides their separate identities. Their ragged conversation is couched in a pastiche of historical, popular, and personal notions of mathematics; however their language is simultaneously natural and mathematical so that it points to the irremediable gaps that the multitude of our languages attempt to "solve." Father McMann pages through his list of such incommensurables: female/male, young/old, parabola/limit, rational/surd and “all the other 88 asynchronies ...


The Barber Who Read History And Was Overwhelmed, Rowan Cahill 2016 University of Wollongong

The Barber Who Read History And Was Overwhelmed, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Beginning with a chance encounter in a Barber's shop whilst travelling, the author ruminates on history, and the proposition that each and everyone of us is an historian, and that in a sense we are all time travellers. Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) is invoked, and the role of radical historians from below discussed before the author returns to his Barber shop encounter, and to Brecht. The title of the piece references Brecht's poem A Worker Reads History (1936).


Western Classics In Modern Japan (German), Frank Jacob 2016 CUNY Queensborough Community College

Western Classics In Modern Japan (German), Frank Jacob

Publications and Research

A presentation paper (invited guest lecture) delivered at the Institute of Ancient History at Marburg University, Germany, July 12, 2016.


Per Axel Rydberg’S Botanical Collecting Trips To Western Nebraska In 1890 And 1891, Robert B. Kaul, David M. Sutherland 2016 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Per Axel Rydberg’S Botanical Collecting Trips To Western Nebraska In 1890 And 1891, Robert B. Kaul, David M. Sutherland

Zea E-Books

In the summer of 1891, Per Axel Rydberg and his assistant, Julius Hjalmar Flodman, collected plants in western Nebraska for the United States Department of Agriculture. They collected many first-records for Nebraska as well as some that became type specimens of Rydberg’s and other botanists’ names. In the following autumn and winter, Rydberg made a detailed, typewritten, carbon copied 35-page Report and 37-page List of specimens from that trip; one carbon copy is in the Bessey Herbarium (NEB) at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. It is these documents that we present here, extensively annotated with our geographic clarifications, original ...


Unconfessing Transgender: Dysphoric Youths And The Medicalization Of Madness In John Gower’S “Tale Of Iphis And Ianthe”, M W. Bychowski 2016 The George Washington University

Unconfessing Transgender: Dysphoric Youths And The Medicalization Of Madness In John Gower’S “Tale Of Iphis And Ianthe”, M W. Bychowski

Accessus

On the brink of the twenty-first century, Judith Butler argues in “Undiagnosing Gender” that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) defines the psychiatric condition of “Gender Identity Disorder” (or “Gender Dysphoria”) in ways that control biological diversity and construct “transgender” as a marginalized identity. By turning the study of gender away from vulnerable individuals and towards the broader systems of power, Butler works to liberate bodies from the medical mechanisms managing difference and precluding potentially disruptive innovations in forms of life and embodiment by creating categories of gender and disability.

Turning to the brink of the 15 ...


The Evolution Of Cryptology, Gwendolyn Rae Souza 2016 California State University - San Bernardino

The Evolution Of Cryptology, Gwendolyn Rae Souza

Electronic Theses, Projects, and Dissertations

We live in an age when our most private information is becoming exceedingly difficult to keep private. Cryptology allows for the creation of encryptive barriers that protect this information. Though the information is protected, it is not entirely inaccessible. A recipient may be able to access the information by decoding the message. This possible threat has encouraged cryptologists to evolve and complicate their encrypting methods so that future information can remain safe and become more difficult to decode. There are various methods of encryption that demonstrate how cryptology continues to evolve through time. These methods revolve around different areas of ...


How Liberal Korean And Taiwanese Textbooks Portray Their Countries’ “Economic Miracles”, Frances Chan 2016 Yale University

How Liberal Korean And Taiwanese Textbooks Portray Their Countries’ “Economic Miracles”, Frances Chan

Student Work

A 2015-2016 William Prize for best essay in East Asian Studies was awarded to Frances Chan (Timothy Dwight College '16) for her essay submitted to the Department of History, “How Liberal Korean and Taiwanese Textbooks Portray their Countries’ “Economic Miracles”.” (Peter C. Perdue, Professor of History, advisor.)

Frances Chan’s essay “How Liberal Korean and Taiwanese Textbooks Portray their Countries’ “Economic Miracles,” is a fascinating exploration of the creation of historical memory as seen in textbooks on the history of postwar economic development in Korea and Taiwan. Drawing on her remarkable linguistic skills in both Korean and Chinese, she compares ...


Adam Smith For Our Time, I: Necroeconomics, Patrick G. Scott 2016 University of South Carolina - Columbia

Adam Smith For Our Time, I: Necroeconomics, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews a wide-ranging new American study of the Scottish philosopher and economist Adam Smith (1723-1790), examining its treatment of Smith as critic and rhetorical theorist, as well as of his better-known writings on moral philosophy in his Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) and economic theory in The Wealth of Nations (1776), and discusses briefly the value for Scottish cultural history of interpretative practices developed originally in other national traditions.


The Creation Of Daoism, Paul Fischer 2016 Western Kentucky University

The Creation Of Daoism, Paul Fischer

Paul Fischer

This paper examines the creation of Daoism in its earliest, pre-Eastern Han period. After an examination of the critical terms "scholar/master" and "author/ school", I argue that, given the paucity of evidence, Sima Tan and Liu Xin should be credited with creating this tradition. The body of this article considers the definitions of Daoism given by these two scholars and all of the extant texts that Liu Xin classified as "Daoist." Based on these texts, I then suggest an amended definition of Daoism. In the conclusion, I address the recent claim that the daojia /daijiao dichotomy is false, speculating ...


‘Our Responsibility And Privilege To Fight Freedom’S Fight’: Neoconservatism, The Project For The New American Century, And The Making Of The Invasion Of Iraq In 2003, Daniel D. McCoy 2016 University of New Orleans, New Orleans

‘Our Responsibility And Privilege To Fight Freedom’S Fight’: Neoconservatism, The Project For The New American Century, And The Making Of The Invasion Of Iraq In 2003, Daniel D. Mccoy

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

The Project for the New American Century (PNAC) was a neoconservative Washington, D.C. foreign policy think tank, comprised of seasoned foreign policy stalwarts who had served multiple presidential administrations as well as outside-the-beltway defense contractors, that was founded in 1997 by William Kristol, editor of the conservative political magazine The Weekly Standard, and Robert Kagan, a foreign policy analyst and political commentator currently at the Brookings Institution. The PNAC would shut down its operations in 2006. Using The Weekly Standard as its mouthpiece, the PNAC helped foment support for the removal of Iraqi president Saddam Hussein beginning in 1998 ...


The Reality Of Combat!: An Analysis Of Historical Memory In Broadcast Television, Kaleb Q. Wentz 2016 East Tennessee State University

The Reality Of Combat!: An Analysis Of Historical Memory In Broadcast Television, Kaleb Q. Wentz

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis is an analysis of the World War II television drama COMBAT!, which ran from 1962 to 1967, and how this program dealt with and addressed the national memory of the Second World War. The way in which the “Good War” is remembered has changed over time. In the years of the conflict and immediately following its conclusion, there was a sense of zealous patriotism surrounding the war, but as our culture changed, a more critical approach was taken.

This paper examines the way in which the show deals with its two main subjects – the American forces and the ...


"Puritan Hypocrisy" And "Conservative Catholicity" : How Roman Catholic Clergy In The Border States Interpreted The U.S. Civil War., Carl C. Creason 2016 University of Louisville

"Puritan Hypocrisy" And "Conservative Catholicity" : How Roman Catholic Clergy In The Border States Interpreted The U.S. Civil War., Carl C. Creason

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This thesis analyzes how Roman Catholic clergy in the Border States—Missouri, Kentucky, and Maryland—interpreted the United States Civil War. Overall, it argues that prelates and priests from the region viewed the war through a religious lens informed by their Catholic worldview. Influenced by their experiences with anti-Catholicism and nativism as well as the arguments of the Catholic apologist movement, the clergy interpreted the war as a product of the ill-effects of Protestantism in the country. In response, the clergy argued that if more Americans had practiced Catholicism then the war could and would have been avoided. Furthermore, this ...


A Machiavellian Christian: Analyzing The Political Theology Of 'The Prince', John G. Addison 2016 University of Arkansas

A Machiavellian Christian: Analyzing The Political Theology Of 'The Prince', John G. Addison

History Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper attempts to reconsider the role that Christian religion played in the political philosophy of Niccolò Machiavelli, focusing specifically on The Prince. Despite regnant popular and scholastic opinion, this paper posits that Machiavelli's ideological foundation falls squarely into the theological and moral traditions and scripture of Christianity, and is thus an inseparable element of the political theory of Machiavelli. Further, this work seeks to illustrate the presence of orthodox political and religious beliefs contained within The Prince and throughout the Machiavellian corpus, focusing on the socio-political milieu of Renaissance Florence and the broader traditions of humanist thought. In ...


Linebaugh: Metaphors, Rebellion, And Socialist Dreaming, Rowan Cahill 2016 University of Wollongong

Linebaugh: Metaphors, Rebellion, And Socialist Dreaming, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

A discussion of the work of radical historian Peter Linebaugh, with the focus on his book The Incomplete, True, Authentic, and Incomplete History of May Day (Oakland: PM Press, 2016). 


The Devil Is In The Details: A Study Of How Ancient Greek Historian Thucydides’ Greatest Work, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, Changed Historiography, Kirsten E. Dodge 2016 Grant High School

The Devil Is In The Details: A Study Of How Ancient Greek Historian Thucydides’ Greatest Work, The History Of The Peloponnesian War, Changed Historiography, Kirsten E. Dodge

Young Historians Conference

Before the time of recorded history, how did people view historical events? Was it just a story that was told and past down with narrative embellishments? Or did they take a more factual approach? This essay will explore one such work of historiography that attempts to transcend history as a story, and more as a necessary combination of dry facts for future generations to use. Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War endeavors to relay only the facts of what he thought would be one of the most influential wars in the history of his modern world.


Shifting Understandings Of Lesbianism In Imperial And Weimar Germany, Meghan C. Paradis 2016 Clark University

Shifting Understandings Of Lesbianism In Imperial And Weimar Germany, Meghan C. Paradis

Scholarly Undergraduate Research Journal at Clark

This paper seeks to understand how, and why, understandings of lesbianism shifted in Germany over the course of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Through close readings of both popular cultural productions and medical and psychological texts produced within the context of Imperial and Weimar Germany, this paper explores the changing nature of understandings of homosexuality in women, arguing that over the course of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the dominant conceptualization of lesbianism transformed from an understanding of lesbians that was rooted in biology and viewed lesbians as physically masculine “gender inverts”, to one that was ...


The Effects Of Denazification On Education In West Germany, Helen Beckert 2016 Murray State University

The Effects Of Denazification On Education In West Germany, Helen Beckert

Scholars Week

During the rebuilding of West Germany after World War II, the education system experienced rapid changes due to denazification. Under Allied occupation, Nazi influence in every aspect of society was to be eliminated. The initial phases of denazification took place in a setting of mass chaos; many German schools had been destroyed during the war, textbooks approved by Nazis were completely unacceptable for use in the postwar era, and teachers who had not belonged to the Nazi Party were few and far between. Despite this myriad of challenges, the schools of West Germany rebounded and began to thrive in the ...


Finding The Truth: An Examination Into The Use Of Rhetoric In Thucydides, Eryn Pritchett 2016 Murray State University

Finding The Truth: An Examination Into The Use Of Rhetoric In Thucydides, Eryn Pritchett

Scholars Week

For centuries, scholars have looked to Thucydides as truth--a factual and accurate account of the Peloponnesian War--due to his thorough use of critical analysis and logical deduction. Unlike his predecessor, Herodotus, Thucydides dodged the critical and literary analysis that has plagued Herodotus for years. However, in the past few decades historians realized that Thucydides is far more than facts on paper. This research project will show that Thucydides use of Athenian rhetoric transforms his work from that of historical accuracy into a "possession for all time," redefining the way other historians would construct their own narrative. (Thucydides, 1.22.1 ...


The Genesis Of The Sonderweg, Annie Everett 2016 University of Tennessee

The Genesis Of The Sonderweg, Annie Everett

International Social Science Review

The precarious legacy of National Socialism has informed much, if not all, of German historiography in the decades since Fritz Fischer first published German War Aims in the First World War in 1961. Sonderweg historiography (scholarship that explores the notion that Germany has followed a separate path to modernity) attempts to anchor the field with two historical assumptions: that an understanding of the greater German past necessitates an inherently negative diagnosis of German ills, and that this diagnosis is a product of and hinges on the emergence of National Socialism in Germany. But what if we excluded National Socialism from ...


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