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How Democratic Is Democracy? A History Of Political Corruption In Peru, Kaitlyn Selzler 2021 University of Nebraska at Kearney

How Democratic Is Democracy? A History Of Political Corruption In Peru, Kaitlyn Selzler

Graduate Review

With the emergence of revisionist scholarship beginning in the 1960’s and 1970’s, scholars have taken terms which had absolute definitions, such as totalitarianism or democracy, and introduced different perspectives and methods which questioned the absolute authority of historical terminology. As a case study into these new historical methodologies, this essay seeks to answer the question: How democratic is Peru’s democracy? To answer this question, this research explores the deep seeded corruption in Latin America, specifically Peru, beginning in 1985 with the election of Alan Garcia, continuing through the presidency of Alberto Fujimori, and eventually ending with the ...


Election Campaigns, Counterinsurgency, And Privatization In Fujimori's Peru: Examples Of Regional, Public, And Control Historiographies, Andrew Beman-Cavallaro 2021 University of Nebraska at Kearney

Election Campaigns, Counterinsurgency, And Privatization In Fujimori's Peru: Examples Of Regional, Public, And Control Historiographies, Andrew Beman-Cavallaro

Graduate Review

No abstract provided.


The Topes De Collantes Sanatorium: A Look At The Global Sanatorium Movement, The Climate Cure Theory, And How Tuberculosis Influenced Modern Architecture, Alex Del Dago 2021 University of North Florida

The Topes De Collantes Sanatorium: A Look At The Global Sanatorium Movement, The Climate Cure Theory, And How Tuberculosis Influenced Modern Architecture, Alex Del Dago

PANDION: The Osprey Journal of Research and Ideas

The Topes de Collantes Sanatorium in Cuba was constructed during a time in medical history when it was commonly believed that a specific climate played a strong role in tuberculosis treatment. My research paper addresses how the so-called “Climate Cure” theory spread throughout the Western hemisphere and influenced the construction of sleek, modern tuberculosis sanatoriums. Previous research and scholarship have looked at major TB sanatoriums in Europe and the United States in depth, however, little has been looked at TB sanatoriums in smaller countries such as Cuba. I seek to fill in this gap of tuberculosis’ history by taking a ...


Making Their Voices Heard- The Nahua Fight To Secure Agency 1575-1820, Micaela Wiehe 2021 Missouri State University

Making Their Voices Heard- The Nahua Fight To Secure Agency 1575-1820, Micaela Wiehe

MSU Graduate Theses

This thesis examines the evolution of the Spanish colonial legal system from 1525-1820 and analyzes the way that the indigenous Nahua people influenced, manipulated, and commanded a powerful conversation with their distant King through interactions with and within the law. By analyzing the extant Spanish colonial legal documents including court records, indigenous codices, land titles, and more, this thesis will attempt to support the theory that the indigenous people in New Spain maneuvered within the many facets of the Spanish legal system to establish themselves as powerful legal actors regaining a significant portion of the freedom taken from them during ...


A Comparative Review: Obeah, Race And Racism: Caribbean Witchcraft In The English Imagination And Experiments With Power: Obeah And The Remaking Of Religion In Trinidad, Britanny Mondragon 2021 CSUSB

A Comparative Review: Obeah, Race And Racism: Caribbean Witchcraft In The English Imagination And Experiments With Power: Obeah And The Remaking Of Religion In Trinidad, Britanny Mondragon

History in the Making

No abstract provided.


Beyond "Viuda De": Practical Approaches To Promoting Mexican Books Printed At Women-Owned Businesses, Taylor Leigh, Colleen W. Barrett 2021 University of Kentucky

Beyond "Viuda De": Practical Approaches To Promoting Mexican Books Printed At Women-Owned Businesses, Taylor Leigh, Colleen W. Barrett

Library Presentations

Women print shop owners have existed for much longer than most people realize, including those in Latin America, where they have been active since at least the seventeenth century. Unfortunately, these texts are not always clearly cataloged or described in a way that is easy to locate beyond searching “viuda de,” in the publisher field. Though many title-pages describe their businesses in terms of being a widow of their husband, these female business owners deserve credit for their efforts and should be findable in their own right. This poster would highlight the strategies and steps taken by a Hispanic studies ...


Forgotten Crime And Cultural Boom: New York And Brazil's Coffee Trading Relationship In The Early Twentieth Century, Collin Green 2021 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Forgotten Crime And Cultural Boom: New York And Brazil's Coffee Trading Relationship In The Early Twentieth Century, Collin Green

The Forum: Journal of History

In the United States of America, coffee and its ever-evolving culture has become a focal point of everyday life. However, we did not just stumble upon this phenomenon; the popularity of coffee was carefully calculated by leaders of the wealthiest coffee companies of the early 20th century in America’s biggest city, New York. In this paper, the history of the powerful coffee trading relationship between Brazil and New York is analyzed on two different levels. Firstly, I examine how New York's big coffee companies successfully participated in criminal activity on an international and national level. Secondly, my focus ...


A Maya Migrant: A Journey Of No Return, Gaspar Pedro González 2021 Kennesaw State University

A Maya Migrant: A Journey Of No Return, Gaspar Pedro González

Maya America: Journal of Essays, Commentary, and Analysis

After years of listening to Maya migrants in the United states and listening to migrants forced back to Guatemala, the novella’s author Gaspar Pedro González created the story of Palas and Malkal, man and wife. The story begins with a discussion of the causes behind migration, and then proceeds to Palas while he arranges his trip with the coyote, makes his goodbyes to his family and community, makes the overland passage through Mexico, and when finally in the United States finds some hopes and plans unobtainable. Palas, and his family left behind in Guatemala, will encounter challenges to their ...


Indigenous Youth Storywork: A Spiritual Awakening Of A Maya Adoptee Living In Kkkanada, Ana Celeste MacLeod 2021 Kennesaw State University

Indigenous Youth Storywork: A Spiritual Awakening Of A Maya Adoptee Living In Kkkanada, Ana Celeste Macleod

Maya America: Journal of Essays, Commentary, and Analysis

Indigenous adoptee scholars understand their identity through community connection, culture, education and practice. In this Storywork, through engagement with current literature and ten research questions, I explored what it meant to be an adoptee in West Coast (KKKanadian) Indigenous communities. An Indigenous Youth Storywork methodology was applied to bring meaning to relationships I have with diverse Indigenous Old Ones, mentors and Knowledge Keepers and their influence on my journey as a Maya adoptee returning to my culture. My personal story was developed and analyzed using an Indigenous decolonial framework and Indigenous Arts-based methods. The intention of this Youth Storywork research ...


Introductory Note, Alan LeBaron 2021 Kennesaw State University

Introductory Note, Alan Lebaron

Maya America: Journal of Essays, Commentary, and Analysis

A note from the editor, Alan LeBaron, reviewing the contents and structure of Maya America Vol. 3 Iss. 2.


La Operación: Coerced Sterilization Of Puerto Rican Women In The 20th Century, Alexandra Lazar 2021 Union College - Schenectady, NY

La Operación: Coerced Sterilization Of Puerto Rican Women In The 20th Century, Alexandra Lazar

Honors Theses

This project examines the ways that Puerto Rican women’s fertility was discussed over time in the United States, and the ways in which these discussions influenced decisions regarding reproductive choices. Looking at articles from popular American publications reveals the way that Americans felt about Puerto Rican sterilization, which can be compared to publications from activist newsletters at the same time. Personal testimonies from Puerto Rican women who chose sterilization reveal that the way others spoke about sterilization was different from how the women themselves viewed it. Their stories also show how the circumstances women were forced to live in ...


Los Zetas, Neoliberalism, And Popular Opposition: A Study In Linkages, Gina R. Lyle 2021 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Los Zetas, Neoliberalism, And Popular Opposition: A Study In Linkages, Gina R. Lyle

Master's Theses

Los Zetas are considered by security analysts to be a transformative force within transnational criminal organizations (TCO), exporting their unique model throughout Mexico. Los Zetas’ idiosyncratic interventions include their diversification of criminal operations, professionalization of TCO security, sophisticated use of media and technology, extreme forms of violent coercion, and decentralized command structure. This project aims to complicate the narrative that Los Zetas emerged because of top leaders’ sadistic tendencies or due to an inherently violent culture in Mexico by reframing the group’s evolution within historical processes. Moving beyond Los Zetas, this project examines how persons affected by Los Zetas ...


Enhancing The Role Of Civil Society Organizations In A Post-Conflict Setting: A Review Of Central American Conflicts In The 1990s, Leticia Guadalupe Murillo 2021 Fordham University

Enhancing The Role Of Civil Society Organizations In A Post-Conflict Setting: A Review Of Central American Conflicts In The 1990s, Leticia Guadalupe Murillo

Senior Theses

The 1990s marked an opportunity for change for three Central American countries facing the end of their civil wars: Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala. Efforts to contribute to democratization and the reconstruction of war-torn societies grew with the increasing presence of United Nations missions and international organizations and donors, but the primary organizations overlooked in these efforts were local civil society organizations (CSOs). Based on the role of CSOs in the post-conflict phases, I intend to answer the following question: How can the role and image of CSOs be enhanced in a post-conflict setting? Improving the role and image of ...


Pero...Maybe, Adrian Gonzalez 2021 Washington University in St. Louis

Pero...Maybe, Adrian Gonzalez

Graduate School of Art Theses

Through collage, assemblage, and object making, I fit unlikely fragments that I call manchitas—stains—together. In my paintings and mixed media assemblages I incorporate references to Spanglish as un acto of making. To me, it’s like the visual work that I make: thinking in one language and speaking another, words start with English but end in Spanish. They sound like English but are Spanish or vice versa. The words look misspelled but are used in everyday conversation. Spanglish is idiosyncratic and is what I build my practice on. I collect materials around me, some I find and some ...


An Inferentially Robust Look At Two Competing Explanations For The Surge In Unauthorized Migration From Central America, Nick Santos 2021 University of San Diego

An Inferentially Robust Look At Two Competing Explanations For The Surge In Unauthorized Migration From Central America, Nick Santos

Dissertations

The last 8 years have seen a dramatic increase in the flow of Central American apprehensions by the U.S. Border Patrol. Explanations for this surge in apprehensions have been split between two leading hypotheses. Most academic scholars, immigrant advocates, progressive media outlets, and human rights organizations identify poverty and violence (the Poverty and Violence Hypothesis) in Central America as the primary triggers responsible. In contrast, while most government officials, conservative think tanks, and the agencies that work in the immigration and border enforcement realm admit poverty and violence may underlie some decisions to migrate, they instead blame lax U ...


De La Esclavitud A La Libertad: La Historia De Una Esclava Afromexicana, Margaree G. Jackson 2021 University of Mississippi Main Campus

De La Esclavitud A La Libertad: La Historia De Una Esclava Afromexicana, Margaree G. Jackson

Vernacular: New Connections in Language, Literature, & Culture

Resumen: “De la esclavitud a la libertad: La historia de una esclava afromexicana,” es una colección de poemas descolonizados contados desde la perspectiva de una mujer afromexicana ficticia del siglo XVII. La protagonista, Maricela Rivas, es una esclava que nació en la plantación azucarera Nuestra Señora de la Concepción, una plantación verdadera ubicada en Veracruz, México. Su historia se basa en las pocas historias que existen sobre la vida de la mujer afromexicana que formaba parte esencial de la sociedad y cultura mexicana pero que le falta representación y una voz. Estos poemas le dan una voz y perspectiva al ...


Constructing The Panama Canal: A Brief History, Ian E. Phillips 2021 Cleveland State University

Constructing The Panama Canal: A Brief History, Ian E. Phillips

The Downtown Review

Seeking to commemorate the construction of the Panama Canal, an engineering marvel widely considered a contender for the eighth wonder of the world, this article attempts to retell the story of the Canal's construction by synthesizing a narrative centered on the Canal under French and American leadership, worker segregation, and labor conditions at the Isthmus.


Yankee Go Home: Roci In Latin America, Vitoria Hadba 2021 CUNY Hunter College

Yankee Go Home: Roci In Latin America, Vitoria Hadba

Theses and Dissertations

In 1984, at an event hosted by the United Nations, American artist Robert Rauschenberg announced his most ambitious and controversial project to date: the Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange—or ROCI. Blending primary source documents with social art history, I retrace the artist’s steps—and missteps—during the first leg of his tour through Mexico, Chile, and Venezuela. This thesis investigates the convoluted political implications of ROCI in Latin America during the transitional period in which binary Cold War politics were ebbing amidst the rise of a global free-market economy.


Truth Commissions And Reparations: A Framework For Post-Conflict Justice In Argentina, Chile Guatemala, And Peru, Anthony Chen 2021 Student

Truth Commissions And Reparations: A Framework For Post-Conflict Justice In Argentina, Chile Guatemala, And Peru, Anthony Chen

Honors Theses (PPE)

This paper seeks to gauge the effectiveness of truth commissions and their links to creating material reparations programs through two central questions. First, are truth commissions an effective way to achieve justice after periods of conflict marked by mass or systemic human rights abuses by the government or guerilla groups? Second, do truth commissions provide a pathway to material reparations programs for victims of these abuses? It will outline the conceptual basis behind truth commissions, material reparations, and transitional justice. It will then engage in case studies and a comparative analysis of truth commissions and material reparations programs in four ...


Community And Idolatry: San Francisco Cajonos, Yalalag, And Betaza Through The Criminal Court Of Villa Alta, 1700-1704, Jessica Mitchell 2021 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Community And Idolatry: San Francisco Cajonos, Yalalag, And Betaza Through The Criminal Court Of Villa Alta, 1700-1704, Jessica Mitchell

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The trials of San Francisco Cajonos and Betaza and Yalálag heard in Villa Alta’s criminal court depict many important facets of life in Colonial Oaxaca, and they especially paint the picture of community, how it was defined and how it operated in reality. Looking specifically at these two rich examples in Villa Alta’s criminal court, at the time, idolatry – native religion, rituals, and devotions defined by Catholics as idolatrous -- helped shape the lines of community and defined who belonged in which space. It also highlights how betrayal and revenge were construed by a community and the response for ...


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