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Full-Text Articles in United States History

All Things To All People, Part One, Peter Aschenbrenner Jan 2105

All Things To All People, Part One, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic has identified the fundamental predicate of Government I, which operated, more or less, under Constitution I, the Constutiton of the year One, as a disposable government. See The Standard Model at War, 17 OCL 350. if government asserts, affirmatively, that it is disposable, isn’t it also asserting that it can replicate its systems (= structures political society) at will? OCL builds on its assertion of political society as a three-goaled contrivance. See Why Do Political Societies Exist? 2 OCL 883. Isn’t such a government asserting the primacy of the needs of civil society? By offering to ...


How Do We Know When Political Societies Change?, Peter Aschenbrenner Jan 2104

How Do We Know When Political Societies Change?, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Predicates, features, attributes and properties of a system are liable to change. How does the change get marked down? For this purpose what facet of a system should command our attention? Any system worth the name, Our Constitutional Logic argues, is aware of its own standing in civil society. OCL considers the issues raised.


Bradley Family Papers (Sc 3079), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Nov 2017

Bradley Family Papers (Sc 3079), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3079. Miscellaneous papers of the Bradley family of Bowling Green, Kentucky. Includes correspondence, personal accounts, cemetery data, condolences on the death of Fanny (Arl) Bradley and her son Henry W. Bradley, and letters from Henry W. Bradley, Jr. written during his Naval service in the Far East after the close of World War II.


Who Is Grace Black? Occupational Therapy In Oregon: Development & Historical Account Of The Profession, Sue Nelson, Aaron Proctor, Lilian Crawford Sep 2017

Who Is Grace Black? Occupational Therapy In Oregon: Development & Historical Account Of The Profession, Sue Nelson, Aaron Proctor, Lilian Crawford

Bee Tree Books

Who is Grace Black? presents the history of occupational therapy in Oregon. Not intended as a comprehensive documentary, the book presents a chronology that hopes to reconnect current practitioners with occupational therapists of the past. Our stories build upon each other and strengthen the foundation of the profession, which is evident in the quality and diversity of today’s occupational therapy practice.


Cave Run Lake Collection, United States Army Corps Of Engineers, Louisville District. Sep 2017

Cave Run Lake Collection, United States Army Corps Of Engineers, Louisville District.

Manuscript Collection Finding Aids

No abstract provided.


Reflections On A Lifetime Of Reading, Frederick W. Guyette Mr. Sep 2017

Reflections On A Lifetime Of Reading, Frederick W. Guyette Mr.

South Carolina Libraries

Here I give an account of my life as a reader. The first books I remember enjoying are those that were read aloud on Captain Kangaroo, such as Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, The Story about Ping, and Stone Soup. When I was a little older, in school we learned about science and current events from the stories in Weekly Reader. This was followed by an interest in baseball and the sports page in the local newspaper. In high school, I was more interested in films than books, but “visual literacy” has it place in life, too. My reading ...


Book Review: Cohen, Adam. Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, And The Sterilization Of Carrie Buck. New York: Penguin Press, 2016., Dana Dawson Sep 2017

Book Review: Cohen, Adam. Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, And The Sterilization Of Carrie Buck. New York: Penguin Press, 2016., Dana Dawson

Saber and Scroll

A review of Adam Cohen's Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck.


Book Review: Leerhsen, Charles. Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2016., Robert Smith Sep 2017

Book Review: Leerhsen, Charles. Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2016., Robert Smith

Saber and Scroll

A review of Charles Leerhsen's Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty.


Monument Review: The National D-Day Memorial, Bedford, Virginia, William F. Lawson Sep 2017

Monument Review: The National D-Day Memorial, Bedford, Virginia, William F. Lawson

Saber and Scroll

The National D-Day Memorial is a privately funded endeavor commemorating the Allied invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944. The Memorial is the brainchild of Bob Slaughter, a former sergeant in the 116th Infantry Regiment of the 29th Infantry Division, a Virginia National Guard unit. Workers broke ground on 11 November 1997, Veterans Day, and officials dedicated the Memorial on 6 June 2001.


Museum Review: The History Galleries Of The National Museum Of African American History And Culture, Washington, D.C., Deanna Simmons Sep 2017

Museum Review: The History Galleries Of The National Museum Of African American History And Culture, Washington, D.C., Deanna Simmons

Saber and Scroll

The idea for a museum dedicated to the contributions made by African Americans was born over a century before the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). Finally, in 2003 Congress passed the National Museum of African American History and Culture Act. This placed the museum under the umbrella of the Smithsonian Institution. From 2003 to the opening of the museum in September of 2016, the project received considerable thought, hard work, and dedication.


The Impact Of Carpatho-Rusyn Immigrants And Their Descendants On The United States, Daniel Rosko Sep 2017

The Impact Of Carpatho-Rusyn Immigrants And Their Descendants On The United States, Daniel Rosko

Saber and Scroll

Among the European immigrants largely unknown to Americans today are the Carpatho-Rusyns, or simply the Rusyns. The height of Rusyn immigration to the United States occurred in the early 1900s. Their peers often misidentified them as Hungarians, Slovaks or Czechoslovaks, Russians, or Ukrainians. Yet, in a manner similar to other European immigrants, the Rusyns played a crucial role in the shaping of their new homeland. The influence of Rusyn immigrants on the United States is substantial and worthy of note.


Strange Bedfellows: Nativism, Know-Nothings, African-Americans, And School Desegregation In Antebellum Massachusetts, Stan Prager Sep 2017

Strange Bedfellows: Nativism, Know-Nothings, African-Americans, And School Desegregation In Antebellum Massachusetts, Stan Prager

Saber and Scroll

In Massachusetts in the 1850s, rapidly changing economic conditions fueled a bewildering set of dislocations. Among other forces, falling labor values for the working class, exponential increases in foreign born populations, poverty and crime, and changing social and political institutions translated into a rage directed at the elite and their failed institutions. This spawned a populist revolt that manifested itself in racism, hatred, xenophobia, exclusion and a determination to overthrow the old order and start afresh. At the same time, African-Americans—chafing at life at the margins in a state that nevertheless offered the best overall quality of life in ...


A Passion For Liberty: German Immigrants In The Creation Of The Republican Party And The Election Of Lincoln, Molly Fischer Sep 2017

A Passion For Liberty: German Immigrants In The Creation Of The Republican Party And The Election Of Lincoln, Molly Fischer

Saber and Scroll

For most of a century, German-Americans nurtured the myth that they, as an ethnic group, had effected the election of Abraham Lincoln. By sheer numbers, they asserted, their votes had sent Lincoln to the White House. While historians have since disproven this myth, it is undeniable that German-Americans played a key role in the formation and early platform of the Republican Party. Those who arrived in the wake of the volatile German Revolutions of 1848-49, the so-called Forty-Eighters, played a particularly central role in formulating the Republican party’s immigration policy and in courting the votes of their countrymen for ...


Marie Paradis And The French-Canadian Connection: Quebec’S Impact On The United States, Anne Midgley Sep 2017

Marie Paradis And The French-Canadian Connection: Quebec’S Impact On The United States, Anne Midgley

Saber and Scroll

There are far fewer studies on French-Canadian immigration to the United States than on that of other immigrant populations. Yet a significant influx of French-speakers from Quebec in the mid-nineteenth to early twentieth centuries provided Canada’s southern neighbour with a people already closely tied to the nation—a people who brought their own language and culture to America and provided a substantial boost to Roman Catholicism in the United States. This influx of Canadians to the United States brought a people who had been closely tied to the origin and development of America, and who for over one hundred ...


The Thomas & Esther Kelsey Children & Descendants (1850s-2000s), Randy Lackovic Sep 2017

The Thomas & Esther Kelsey Children & Descendants (1850s-2000s), Randy Lackovic

Darling Marine Center Historical Documents

This is chapter in the history of Wentworth Point. Thomas (1802-1883) and Esther (1801-1881) Kelsey are buried at the cemetery at the Darling Marine Center. This is about their five children that reached majority, and the families and descendants of those children.


Wisconsin Agriculture: A History, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg Sep 2017

Wisconsin Agriculture: A History, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg

Pamela Riney-Kehrberg

Review of: "Wisconsin Agriculture: A History," by Jerry Apps.


Dividing Germany, Accepting An Invitation To Empire: The Life, Death, And Historical Significance Of George Kennan's "Program A", John Gleb Sep 2017

Dividing Germany, Accepting An Invitation To Empire: The Life, Death, And Historical Significance Of George Kennan's "Program A", John Gleb

Claremont-UC Undergraduate Research Conference on the European Union

This paper will attempt to reinterpret the early Cold War moment in Euro-American relations that gave rise to and ultimately destroyed George Kennan’s plan to reunify and neutralize Germany—the so-called “Program A” of 1948–49. Kennan envisioned his Program as the first and decisive step towards creating a “free European community” capable of acting as a non-aligned “third force,” thus ending the Cold War on the Continent. But before it could be presented to the United States’ European allies, Britain and France, some of the plan’s principal features were leaked to the New York Times. These features ...


The Leeman House, The Willett House, & Mcguire Point, Randy Lackovic Sep 2017

The Leeman House, The Willett House, & Mcguire Point, Randy Lackovic

Darling Marine Center Historical Documents

This is a local history of former residents of the Leeman House at the Darling Marine Center in Walpole, ME. It is also a history of McGuire Point in Walpole, Maine, and it is a history of past residents of the Willett House of the University of Maine at McGuire Point.


Confederate Monuments Tell Wrong Story About History, Michael J. Slinger Sep 2017

Confederate Monuments Tell Wrong Story About History, Michael J. Slinger

Michael J. Slinger

No abstract provided.


Extended Commentary: The Good That Came Out Of The Cold War, Alexander Amoroso Sep 2017

Extended Commentary: The Good That Came Out Of The Cold War, Alexander Amoroso

International Social Science Review

This analysis examines the Truman administration's policy on racism, the Civil Rights movement on humanitarianism, NATO's nuclear program, and the Space Agency's work, and how they all related to the Cold War and reflected the good that came out of it.


To The Brink: Turkish And Cuban Missiles During The Height Of The Cold War, Cody Fuelling Sep 2017

To The Brink: Turkish And Cuban Missiles During The Height Of The Cold War, Cody Fuelling

International Social Science Review

This article examines the importance of the placement of intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) in Turkey during the Eisenhower administration and how this maneuver contributed to the Cold War and subsequent Cuban missile crisis.


Under Pressure: The Nonpartisan League In South Central Minnesota, Jonathan Soucek Sep 2017

Under Pressure: The Nonpartisan League In South Central Minnesota, Jonathan Soucek

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

The Nonpartisan League attempted to enter Minnesota politics in 1918, with Charles Lindbergh, Sr. as the League-endorsed candidate for governor in the Republican primaries. As the League moved into Minnesota in 1917, it hoped to achieve the same success it had in North Dakota. Unfortunately, the United States entered World War I in April of 1917 as the Nonpartisan League began to organize in Minnesota. The League opposed America’s entry into the war, but supported the war effort when the United States declared war on Germany. League opponents and much of the general public, however, labeled the Nonpartisan League ...


The Black Press In Minnesota During World War I, Alejandra Galvan Sep 2017

The Black Press In Minnesota During World War I, Alejandra Galvan

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

April 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the United States entering World War I. Many enjoy learning about the battles, the military, and the Homefront. But there is a need for more scholarship to understand the role African Americans played in the war. From my research, many African Americans disagreed with US involvement. Why would a country agree to fight for democracy overseas when its citizens need freedom at home? Racism in the United States concerned African Americans deeply. At the same time, however, African Americans viewed World War I as a way to demonstrate their patriotism. Black citizens ...


Identity Behind Glass: The Second Gore Place Greenhouse, Sean P. Romo Aug 2017

Identity Behind Glass: The Second Gore Place Greenhouse, Sean P. Romo

Graduate Masters Theses

This thesis examines the second greenhouse at Gore Place, a historic country estate in Waltham, Massachusetts. Gore Place was owned by and named for Christopher and Rebecca Gore, members of the 18th- and 19th-century political and economic elite in New England. The greenhouse was constructed in 1806, and excavation at the site took place in 2004, 2008, and 2012. The latter two projects were data recovery excavations, which exposed portions of the greenhouse’s foundations and interior, as well as several features in the yard surrounding the building. Historic greenhouses were prestigious structures, financially accessible only to institutions, governments, and ...


Frontiersmen Settlers & Catle Rustlers: Pease Stories, Carol Steinhauer Aug 2017

Frontiersmen Settlers & Catle Rustlers: Pease Stories, Carol Steinhauer

Works by Local Authors

Carol Steinhauer traces the Pease family back through nine generations. Frontiersmen Settlers & Catle Rustlers: Pease Stories includes photographs, historical details, and family legends.


In Gettysburg, The Confederacy Won, Scott Hancock Aug 2017

In Gettysburg, The Confederacy Won, Scott Hancock

Africana Studies Faculty Publications

Almost every day, I ride my bicycle past some of the over 1,300 statues and monuments commemorating the Civil War in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, where I live. They are everywhere. None of them are of black people.

The Battle of Gettysburg, fought over three days in July of 1863, is often considered the turning point of a war fought over the fate of slavery in America. Black people ultimately were the reason why over 165,000 soldiers came to this Pennsylvania town in the first place. But on the battlefield, as far as the physical memorials, they disappear. (excerpt)


Understanding The Essex Junto: Fear, Dissent, And Propaganda In The Early Republic, Dinah Mayo-Bobee Aug 2017

Understanding The Essex Junto: Fear, Dissent, And Propaganda In The Early Republic, Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Historians have never formed a consensus over the Essex Junto. In fact, though often associated with New England Federalists, propagandists evoked the Junto long after the Federalist Party’s demise in 1824. This article chronicles uses of the term Essex Junto and its significance as it evolved from the early republic through the 1840s.


Book Review Of Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams And The Grand Strategy Of The Republic By Charles N. Edel, Dinah Mayo-Bobee Aug 2017

Book Review Of Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams And The Grand Strategy Of The Republic By Charles N. Edel, Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Charles N. Edel, a professor at the US Naval War College, demonstrates why John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) remains one of the most fascinating figures in US history. Although interpreting Adams's political actions through the lens of nationalism is not unusual, Edel's biography manages to provide a fresh look at Adams as secretary of state (1817-1825), president (1825- 1829), and Massachusetts representative in the US Congress (1831-1848).


Book Review Of Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter Of Monticello: Her Life And Times By Cynthia A. Kierner, Dinah Mayo-Bobee Aug 2017

Book Review Of Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter Of Monticello: Her Life And Times By Cynthia A. Kierner, Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Dinah Mayo-Bobee

In recent years, historians have broadened our knowledge of early US history by providing glimpses into the public and personal lives of historical women. A new addition to this body of work is Cynthia A. Kierner's biography on Martha Jefferson Randolph (1772-1836).


Book Review Of A Companion To James Madison And James Monroe, Dinah Mayo-Bobee Aug 2017

Book Review Of A Companion To James Madison And James Monroe, Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Dinah Mayo-Bobee

Excerpt: In this new anthology, editor Stuart Leibiger of La Salle University has compiled thirty-two essays that explore the lives and often overlapping careers of Virginians James Madison and James Monroe.