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Humanization Of The Enemy: The Pacifist Soldier And France In World War One, Daniel E. Stockman 2017 Dominican University of California

Humanization Of The Enemy: The Pacifist Soldier And France In World War One, Daniel E. Stockman

Senior Theses and Capstone Projects

Not all French citizens were enthused by the prospect of war in 1914, nor were they all so willing to embrace a dehumanized view of the enemy. Some French citizens believed the “Great War” to be a patriotic endeavor. Propaganda encouraged this nationalism and the dehumanization of the enemy. “Political” pacifism existed within the French Third Republic psyche following France’s defeat in the 1870 Franco-Prussian War. However, these pacifistic undertones were systematically undermined as France began to militarize itself. Drawing from a series of notebooks, and established academic sources, this paper shows that some French soldiers endured a world ...


Napalm: More Than A Weapon, Edwin Martini 2016 Western Michigan University

Napalm: More Than A Weapon, Edwin Martini

Edwin A. Martini

This book will explore the military, political, and cultural history of napalm across time and space. Moving beyond the Vietnam War, this book will examine the use of napalm by the United States in World War Two, Korea, and elsewhere, and its proliferation in other countries’ arsenals as well. It will also explore the many cultural representations of napalm in the post-Vietnam war world.


Where Was Canada? The Canadian Military Contribution To The British Commonwealth Second World War Campaign In North Africa, Andrew Stewart 2016 Wilfrid Laurier University

Where Was Canada? The Canadian Military Contribution To The British Commonwealth Second World War Campaign In North Africa, Andrew Stewart

Canadian Military History

The campaign fought by predominantly British Commonwealth forces in North Africa during the Second World War, in many respects, represented a final example of imperial solidarity and unity. Whilst the United States participated during the final stages prior to the surrender of Axis forces in May 1943, it was Britain and its Empire that provided most of the resources and manpower and contested most of the battles. Canada, however, played only a relatively minor part and this paper seeks to examine the associated decision-making process that took place in London and Ottawa and discuss the tensions that arose.


Destroying The Panthers: The Effect Of Allied Combat Action On I./Ss Panzer Regiment 12 In Normandy, 1944, Arthur Gullachsen 2016 Wilfrid Laurier University

Destroying The Panthers: The Effect Of Allied Combat Action On I./Ss Panzer Regiment 12 In Normandy, 1944, Arthur Gullachsen

Canadian Military History

This article is an examination of the operational record of the World War Two German Panther tank during the Normandy Campaign of summer 1944. Challenging its perception as mechanically unreliable, this article argues Allied combat action was responsible for a large percentage of Panthers that were out of action. Secondly, the inferior resources of the German tank replacement and repair program were no match for superior Canadian Army practices during 1944. To support these arguments the author examines Canadian and German wartime primary documents as well as multiple secondary sources.


More Sieve Than Shield: The U.S. Army And Cords In The Pacification Of Phu Yen Province, Republic Of Vietnam, 1965-1972, Robert John Thompson III 2016 University of Southern Mississippi

More Sieve Than Shield: The U.S. Army And Cords In The Pacification Of Phu Yen Province, Republic Of Vietnam, 1965-1972, Robert John Thompson Iii

Dissertations

This dissertation addresses the meaning and execution of pacification during the Vietnam War in the Republic of Vietnam’s Phu Yen Province. Vietnam War scholarship never defined the term, an unsurprising fact given those that directed the war itself never agreed on a lasting interpretation. Void of an analysis of the word, pacification is erroneously discussed as a separate facet, rather than the foundation, of the war. When discussed, pacification is often seen solely as the developmental aspect of the war and one far removed from the battles waged by conventional armies. On the contrary, two dissimilar and tangentially related ...


Bearing The Double Burden: Combat Chaplains And The Vietnam War, John Donellan Fitzmorris III 2016 University of Southern Mississippi

Bearing The Double Burden: Combat Chaplains And The Vietnam War, John Donellan Fitzmorris Iii

Dissertations

Throughout the period of the Vietnam War, soldiers and Marines of the United States Military were accompanied into the combat zones by members of the clergy who were also part of the military. These chaplains attempted to bring God to the men in the field by providing spiritual and moral support through worship services and certain counseling duties. A number of chaplains, however, believed so strongly in their ministry that they refused to simply stay “on base” and instead shouldered their packs and journeyed with their troops into the most perilous combat zones. In so doing , these combat chaplains took ...


With The Tigers Over China, 1941-1942, Jerome Klinkowitz 2016 University of Northern Iowa

With The Tigers Over China, 1941-1942, Jerome Klinkowitz

Jerome Klinkowitz

In the twelve months centered around the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, a diverse group of American and British flyers fought one of the most remarkable air campaigns of WWII. Pilots including Claire Chennault, "Pappy" Boyington, and Art Donahue bought time for an Allied regrouping against Japan's relentless assault in the China-Burma-India theater. In the face of the 1941 bombings, Chiang Kai-shek turned to air power to survive, which he did thanks to Chennault's rebuilding of the Chinese Air Force and the leadership of the American Volunteer Group, or AVG.

Formed by Chennault, the AVG, also known as ...


Yanks Over Europe: American Flyers In World War Ii, Jerome Klinkowitz 2016 University of Northern Iowa

Yanks Over Europe: American Flyers In World War Ii, Jerome Klinkowitz

Jerome Klinkowitz

Contrasts between fighter combat and the bombers' war support Klinkowitz's belief that notions of the air war were determined by one's position in it. He extends his thesis by showing the vastly different style of air war described by veterans of the North African and Mediterranean campaigns and concludes by studying the effects of such combat on adversaries and victims.

Air combat, Klinkowitz writes, offers a unique perspective on the nature of war. The experience of combat has inspired authors to combine exquisite descriptions with probing thoughtfulness, covering the full range of human expression from exultation to heartbreak ...


The Successes And Failures Of The Battle Of Mogadishu And Its Effects On U.S. Foreign Policy, Philip B. Dotson 2016 Cedarville University

The Successes And Failures Of The Battle Of Mogadishu And Its Effects On U.S. Foreign Policy, Philip B. Dotson

Channels: Where Disciplines Meet

The Battle of Mogadishu, more commonly referred to as “Black Hawk Down,” was one of the most controversial conflicts in the second half of the twentieth century. It left a lingering question in people’s minds: was it a success or a failure? While certainly there were many failures and casualties throughout the mission, based on a military definition, it was a clear cut success; Task Force Ranger (TFR) accomplished the objective of the mission, despite significant losses, by retrieving the two targets assigned them. Both the failures and successes of the mission, as well as the overarching Operation Restore ...


Ansel Brooks Smith, Letter Fragment, No Date Noted, No Location Noted, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr. 2016 University of North Florida

Ansel Brooks Smith, Letter Fragment, No Date Noted, No Location Noted, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr.

Ansel Brooks Smith, Sr. Letters

No abstract provided.


Imperial Correlations Between The German Kaiserreich In Eastern Europe And The Third Reich In Eastern Europe, Laura Guebert 2016 Murray State University

Imperial Correlations Between The German Kaiserreich In Eastern Europe And The Third Reich In Eastern Europe, Laura Guebert

Posters-at-the-Capitol

This project is an examination of correlations between imperial enterprises of the Second German Empire and the Nazi Reich through the lenses of global and imperial critiques. The two primary case studies are the German Ober Ost and Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe, particularly the General Government. This research draws heavily on certain themes and theories developed by leading historians of modern German and Eastern European history, including Timothy Snyder, Alexander Watson, Ben Kiernan, Shelley Baranowski, and Peter Fritzsche. By understanding the shared trends of empire and genocide, it is my aim to bring the actions of the National Socialists out of ...


Book Review: O’Shaughnessy, Andrew Jackson. The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, The American Revolution, And The Fate Of The Empire. New Haven, Ct: Yale University Press, 2013., Robert Smith 2016 American Public University System

Book Review: O’Shaughnessy, Andrew Jackson. The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, The American Revolution, And The Fate Of The Empire. New Haven, Ct: Yale University Press, 2013., Robert Smith

Saber and Scroll

A review of Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy's The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, The American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire.


“How Is It That We Hear The Loudest Yelps For Liberty Among The Drivers Of Negroes?”, Anne Midgley 2016 American Public University System

“How Is It That We Hear The Loudest Yelps For Liberty Among The Drivers Of Negroes?”, Anne Midgley

Saber and Scroll

In his response to colonial American cries for relief from the taxation and legislative control of Great Britain, Samuel Johnson, the great eighteenth century writer, excoriated the American rebels for the obvious hypocrisy of their claims to liberty. During the mid-eighteenth century, anti-slavery opinions arose in Britain, particularly among the educated classes. Johnson’s sentiment in his resolution to the American Congress reflects the growing British sense of moral outrage at slavery, which led to Britain’s abolition of its slave trade in 1787 and outright abolition of slavery in 1834. Not every black person in America was enslaved and ...


Daughters Of Liberty: The Women Who Fought In The American Revolution, Kimberly Trenner 2016 American Public University System

Daughters Of Liberty: The Women Who Fought In The American Revolution, Kimberly Trenner

Saber and Scroll

While women may not have had a voice in politics during the American Revolution, they had a voice at home and they expressed their beliefs and fears. Women such as Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, and Mercy Otis Warren were able to use the time with their husbands and their husband’s friends to aid in setting in motion the split from England. Other women called for boycotts of local merchants who were thought to be price gouging due to the war and limited supplies getting through from England. When open warfare broke out in 1775, many women chose to follow ...


Medical Services Available During The Revolutionary War Including Treatment For Soldiers Wounded In Action, Jessica Lathrop 2016 American Public University System

Medical Services Available During The Revolutionary War Including Treatment For Soldiers Wounded In Action, Jessica Lathrop

Saber and Scroll

One of the often uncharted avenues of United States Revolutionary War information pertains to the care and treatment of wounded soldiers, from medical services available during the late eighteenth century to the treatment of veterans. This paper seeks to examine, at least briefly, the various methods of medical care for wounded soldiers and their families as well as the options within the colonies for long term and short term veteran treatment


“Give Them An Indian Halloo!”, Anne Midgley 2016 American Public University System

“Give Them An Indian Halloo!”, Anne Midgley

Saber and Scroll

On the cold winter morning of 17 January 1781 in a backcountry South Carolina cow pasture, one of the most unexpected—and pivotal—battles of the American War for Independence occurred. In less than an hour of intense fighting, Brigadier General Daniel Morgan, in command of the American rebel forces, decisively trounced his opponent, British Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton. Known by military historians as the American Cannae, it was the only case of double envelopment in the war. Morgan, with a personal grudge to bear against the British, led a force of Continental soldiers, cavalry, and militia against one of ...


Daniel Morgan And Cowpens, Francis Hoeflinger 2016 American Public University System

Daniel Morgan And Cowpens, Francis Hoeflinger

Saber and Scroll

After the British defeat and destruction of the Continental Army at the Battle of Camden, Continental Congress assigned General Nathanael Greene as the new commander of the Continental Army Southern Department. One of the assets that General Greene had assigned to his army was a battalion of Light Infantry under the command of Brigadier General Daniel Morgan. Daniel Morgan had participated in a large number of the major operations conducted by the Continental Army, including the siege of Boston, the American attack on Quebec, and the Battle of Saratoga, and always at the command of Light Infantry, or as they ...


Morgan Saw Him Coming: Banastre Tarleton And The Pursuit To Cowpens, William F. Lawson 2016 American Public University System

Morgan Saw Him Coming: Banastre Tarleton And The Pursuit To Cowpens, William F. Lawson

Saber and Scroll

The defeated British commander at the Battle of Cowpens was Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton. Only 26, he was young for such a post, but had proven himself an able and, at times, gifted commander, especially in the area of mobile operations. Tarleton’s youthful energy served him well in the field, as he pushed himself and the men of his British Legion hard, often surprising his American adversaries. For all his success, however, Tarleton’s lack of seasoning resulted in a downside to his operations. He was often reckless, to the detriment of his force in terms of the state ...


Nathanael Greene, Elizabeth D. Young 2016 American Public University System

Nathanael Greene, Elizabeth D. Young

Saber and Scroll

The early morning hours of 17 January 1781 were cold and damp as Brigadier General Daniel Morgan’s wing of the southern army prepared to fight. They had reached the Cowpens the day before and were rested and well fed. Coming to meet them was part of the British army under the command of Colonel Banastre Tarleton. Drawn up in a single line of battle, Tarleton’s legion was met first by fire from sharpshooters, then from militiamen, and finally from Continentals. The militiamen were under orders to fire three volleys and fall back to the Continental line. When the ...


General Charles Lord Cornwallis And The British Southern Strategy, Anne Midgley 2016 American Public University System

General Charles Lord Cornwallis And The British Southern Strategy, Anne Midgley

Saber and Scroll

General Charles Lord Cornwallis’s temper snapped—as did the sword blade upon which he was leaning—as he listened to a humbled Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton relate to him the details of his defeat at a backwoods pasture known as Hannah’s Cowpens. The American rebels, led by Brigadier General Daniel Morgan, had trounced the British. Tarleton’s losses were appalling, perhaps as high as eighty percent of the men he had led into battle, which represented nearly twenty-five percent of the army led by Cornwallis. Tarleton left behind over one hundred dead and nearly eight hundred men whom ...


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