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Napalm: More Than A Weapon, Edwin Martini 2016 Western Michigan University

Napalm: More Than A Weapon, Edwin Martini

Edwin A. Martini

This book will explore the military, political, and cultural history of napalm across time and space. Moving beyond the Vietnam War, this book will examine the use of napalm by the United States in World War Two, Korea, and elsewhere, and its proliferation in other countries’ arsenals as well. It will also explore the many cultural representations of napalm in the post-Vietnam war world.


2016 Annual Dinner Program, The O'Callahan Society, College of the Holy Cross 2016 College of the Holy Cross

2016 Annual Dinner Program, The O'Callahan Society, College Of The Holy Cross

Annual Dinner Program

Sixteenth in a series of speaker events sponsored by The O'Callahan Society at its annual dinner. The keynote speaker is Vice Admiral Peter Daly '77, USN (Ret.), CEO U.S. Naval Institute. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the establishment of the Naval ROTC program at the College of the Holy Cross.

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Book Review: Keppie, Lawrence. The Making Of The Roman Army: From Republic To Empire. London: B.T. Batsford, 1984., Christopher Sheline 2016 American Public University System

Book Review: Keppie, Lawrence. The Making Of The Roman Army: From Republic To Empire. London: B.T. Batsford, 1984., Christopher Sheline

Saber and Scroll

A review of Lawrence Keppie's The Making of the Roman Army: From Republic to Empire.


“Of The People, By The People, For The People”: The Transformation Of Gettysburg Battlefield Park From A Site Of Official Culture To A Popular Tourist Attraction, Joseph J. Cook 2016 American Public University System

“Of The People, By The People, For The People”: The Transformation Of Gettysburg Battlefield Park From A Site Of Official Culture To A Popular Tourist Attraction, Joseph J. Cook

Saber and Scroll

In November 1863, thousands descended upon the small town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, to commemorate the thousands who had descended upon and fallen upon the field around the town four months earlier. They came for a ceremony of official culture: the dedication of a national cemetery for thousands of citizen-soldiers of the Union. Southerners were excluded from this initial commemoration; little did any of the people present in November 1863 know the tremendous role Southerners would play in adopting this sacred field for popular pilgrimages in the years after the war. Nor could those on the stage know the extent to ...


Overcoming Fear: Realizing Production At The Willow Run Bomber Plant, Michael R. Majerczyk 2016 American Public University System

Overcoming Fear: Realizing Production At The Willow Run Bomber Plant, Michael R. Majerczyk

Saber and Scroll

In 1941, bulldozers began clearing Henry Ford’s farm in Ypsilanti, Michigan, twenty-five miles west of Detroit, to make way for the massive Willow Run Bomber Plant. By May 1942, thirty-thousand workers had produced their first B-24 Liberator. Efficiency continued to improve and by November 1943 Willow Run had produced one-thousand Liberators. A month after D-day Ford Motor Company made good on its promise to build one bomber an hour. At its pinnacle, Willow Run employed 42,331 workers, and when production ceased in June 1945 the plant had produced a total of 8,685 Liberators. The numbers are impressive ...


The Fall Of Fort Duquesne And The Rise Of Fort Pitt, Daniel Rosko 2016 American Public University System

The Fall Of Fort Duquesne And The Rise Of Fort Pitt, Daniel Rosko

Saber and Scroll

In 1754, the French constructed the first fort near the confluence of three rivers—the Ohio, the Allegheny, and the Monongahela—and named it Fort Duquesne in honor of Ange Duquesne de Menneville, Marquis de Duquesne, the Governor General of New France from 1752 until 1755. By 1761, the British completed construction on Fort Pitt, named after William Pitt, Secretary of State for the Southern Department from 1757 until his resignation in 1761. The British and French battled to gain control of this critical site, which resulted in the loss of French control of the area and the rise of ...


General John Bell Hood: His Leadership During The 1864 Tennessee Campaign, Christopher N. Schloemer 2016 American Public University System

General John Bell Hood: His Leadership During The 1864 Tennessee Campaign, Christopher N. Schloemer

Saber and Scroll

John Bell Hood was one of the Confederacy’s best brigade and division commanders. However, when promoted to army command in 1864, many of the qualities that served him well in his previous position turned out to be a detriment. Hood’s performance was a classic case of an individual promoted into a position beyond his abilities. Hood’s drive to invade Tennessee and proceed through Kentucky to eventually meet up with General Robert E. Lee failed. Setbacks at Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville resulted in the destruction of the Army of Tennessee. Although Hood inherited a difficult situation, considering ...


Developing Deadly Skies, John Maker 2016 Wilfrid Laurier University

Developing Deadly Skies, John Maker

Canadian Military History

The Canadian War Museum’s exhibition Deadly Skies – Air War, 1914-1918 examines the first air war from the perspective of nine international participants representing Canada, the United States, France, Great Britain, and Germany. Eschewing the romantic mythology of First World War aviation that focuses on the achievements of individual fighter pilots, the exhibition examines four key aspects of the air war: training, observation, bombing, and aerial combat. Adopting an interpretive approach that appeals to intergenerational audiences and that highlights personal experience in the war, the exhibition is presented as a series of life-sized graphic novels, supplemented with key artifacts, photos ...


Ms-199: Mary Metcalf Barrett Letters, Lauren H. Roedner 2016 Gettysburg College

Ms-199: Mary Metcalf Barrett Letters, Lauren H. Roedner

All Finding Aids

This collection is comprised of seventeen Civil War era letters from Mary Metcalf Barrett to her sister, Elvira Metcalf Aplin between 1859 and 1872. She discusses her feelings about the Civil War, her worry over her son and nephews away fighting, her experiences of life on the home front in Manchester, New Hampshire during the war when foodstuffs are expensive and sometimes hard to find. She repeatedly mentions the mills and industries in town limiting hours or closing altogether, affecting all the employees and making the town destitute. She talks about her income from making and mending clothing but also ...


History Of The College Of The Holy Cross Naval Rotc Unit, The O'Callahan Society, College of the Holy Cross 2016 College of the Holy Cross

History Of The College Of The Holy Cross Naval Rotc Unit, The O'Callahan Society, College Of The Holy Cross

75th Anniversary of NROTC at Holy Cross

This history begins with an overview of the Naval ROTC Unit at the College of the Holy Cross, and includes several appendices that provide data on the Unit’s graduates, those killed on active duty, and awards for combat heroism. It also calls attention to transition points in the Unit’s history: the Vietnam War crisis in 1970 and 1971, the introduction of women to the Unit, the transition from a Holy Cross-only Unit to one based on the Worcester Consortium for Higher Education, the Peace Dividend years of the 1990s, the role of the Marine Officer Instructor, and the ...


“Absolutely Incapable Of ‘Carrying On:’” Shell Shock, Suicide, And The Death Of Lieutenant Colonel Sam Sharpe, Matthew Barrett 2016 Wilfrid Laurier University

“Absolutely Incapable Of ‘Carrying On:’” Shell Shock, Suicide, And The Death Of Lieutenant Colonel Sam Sharpe, Matthew Barrett

Canadian Military History

This article examines Canadian social and medical responses to nervous breakdown and suicide in the First World War through the case study of Lieutenant Colonel Sam Sharpe, a Member of Parliament and commander of the 116th Battalion. An historical analysis of Sharpe’s experiences and reaction to war trauma provides wider insights into how shell shock and military suicide represented a potential threat to prewar masculine ideals. Medical and political interpretations of Sharpe’s breakdown initially aimed to preserve social stability and validate the war’s moral justifications but contradictory understandings of shell shock ultimately made for a complicated and ...


Francophone Enlistment In The Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914–1918: The Evidence, Jean Martin 2016 Wilfrid Laurier University

Francophone Enlistment In The Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914–1918: The Evidence, Jean Martin

Canadian Military History

Francophone enlistment during the First World War has been estimated in the past between 35,000 and 50,000, including the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the merchant marine. Information on the language spoken was not recorded at enlistment and those estimates were based on very cautious guesses only. We had suggested in a recent paper (Canadian Historical Review, vol. 96, no. 3) that this participation had been significantly higher, in part due to the contribution of Francophones from outside the province of Quebec. Information have now been extracted from enlistment sheets and one new B database, comprised of 10 ...


Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, April 15, 1918, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr. 2016 University of North Florida

Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, April 15, 1918, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr.

Ansel Brooks Smith, Sr. Letters

No abstract provided.


Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, No Date Noted, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr. 2016 University of North Florida

Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, No Date Noted, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr.

Ansel Brooks Smith, Sr. Letters

No abstract provided.


Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, February 28, 1918, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr. 2016 University of North Florida

Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, February 28, 1918, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr.

Ansel Brooks Smith, Sr. Letters

No abstract provided.


The Poet's Corpus: Memory And Monumentality In Wilfred Owen's "The Show", Charles Hunter Joplin 2016 The University of Southern Mississippi

The Poet's Corpus: Memory And Monumentality In Wilfred Owen's "The Show", Charles Hunter Joplin

Master's Theses

Wilfred Owen is widely recognized to be the greatest English “trench poet” of the First World War. His posthumously published war poems sculpt a nightmarish vision of trench warfare, one which enables Western audiences to consider the suffering of the English soldiers and the brutality of modern warfare nearly a century after the armistice. However, critical readings of Owen’s canonized corpus, including “The Show” (1917, 1918), only focus on their hellish imagery. I will add to these readings by demonstrating that “The Show” is primarily concerned with the limitations of lyric poetry, the monumentality of poetic composition, and the ...


Mr. Jefferson's Army In Mr. Madison's War: Atrophy, Policy, And Legacy In The War Of 1812, David Alan Martin 2016 University of Southern Mississippi

Mr. Jefferson's Army In Mr. Madison's War: Atrophy, Policy, And Legacy In The War Of 1812, David Alan Martin

Master's Theses

President Thomas Jefferson is a well-known figure, who is not well understood. His military policies are under-examined in the historiography. Yet, he had a tremendous impact on martial development in the Early Republic. Jefferson reshaped the military to suite his pragmatic republican ideals. His militia system expanded while the regulars were disbanded. The Navy was greatly decreased, and the remainder of his military was used for frontier exploration, riverine trade, road development, and other public works. This disrupted the precedent of strong federal military development as set by his predecessors: George Washington and John Adams. His reforms also left the ...


Civil War - Brownsville, Kentucky (Sc 3039), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2016 Western Kentucky University

Civil War - Brownsville, Kentucky (Sc 3039), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and transcription (Click on "Additional Files" below) only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3039. Letter, 12 October 1861, to his father from an unidentified Confederate soldier in the 2nd Tennessee Cavalry Battalion. He describes his march from Bowling Green, Kentucky to Brownsville, Kentucky, and camp conditions. He also comments on Union sentiment there as distinct from abolitionism; describes an alarm raised in camp when one of the men was fired upon while watering his horse at Green River; and praises his captain for his treatment of the men and for discouraging any celebration when citizens were asked to ...


Alexander, Fay S., 1896-1972 (Sc 3038), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2016 Western Kentucky University

Alexander, Fay S., 1896-1972 (Sc 3038), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3038. Letter, 3 June 1918, of Fay S. Alexander to his parents in Ashland, Ohio. Writing from Camp Taylor, Kentucky, he reports on a quarantine due to measles, his meals, leisure and exercise, and refers to arguments among his “jolly bunch” of comrades.


The Battle Of Sekigahara, Nicholas Lanza 2016 La Salle University

The Battle Of Sekigahara, Nicholas Lanza

The Histories

The Battle of Sekigahara was a pivotal battle in October of 1600 that truly unified Japan and also established a new shogunate that lasted for 268 years. The battle was fought between two factions: the Eastern Army, under the command of Ieyasu Tokugawa, and the Western Army, commanded by Mitsunari Ishida. The forces at the Battle were roughly evenly matched, the outcome could have easily been different if not for the actions of certain commanders.


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