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Napalm: More Than A Weapon, Edwin Martini 2016 Western Michigan University

Napalm: More Than A Weapon, Edwin Martini

Edwin A. Martini

This book will explore the military, political, and cultural history of napalm across time and space. Moving beyond the Vietnam War, this book will examine the use of napalm by the United States in World War Two, Korea, and elsewhere, and its proliferation in other countries’ arsenals as well. It will also explore the many cultural representations of napalm in the post-Vietnam war world.


“Absolutely Incapable Of ‘Carrying On:’” Shell Shock, Suicide, And The Death Of Lieutenant Colonel Sam Sharpe, Matthew Barrett 2016 Wilfrid Laurier University

“Absolutely Incapable Of ‘Carrying On:’” Shell Shock, Suicide, And The Death Of Lieutenant Colonel Sam Sharpe, Matthew Barrett

Canadian Military History

This article examines Canadian social and medical responses to nervous breakdown and suicide in the First World War through the case study of Lieutenant Colonel Sam Sharpe, a Member of Parliament and commander of the 116th Battalion. An historical analysis of Sharpe’s experiences and reaction to war trauma provides wider insights into how shell shock and military suicide represented a potential threat to prewar masculine ideals. Medical and political interpretations of Sharpe’s breakdown initially aimed to preserve social stability and validate the war’s moral justifications but contradictory understandings of shell shock ultimately made for a complicated and ...


Francophone Enlistment In The Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914–1918: The Evidence, Jean Martin 2016 Wilfrid Laurier University

Francophone Enlistment In The Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914–1918: The Evidence, Jean Martin

Canadian Military History

Francophone enlistment during the First World War has been estimated in the past between 35,000 and 50,000, including the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the merchant marine. Information on the language spoken was not recorded at enlistment and those estimates were based on very cautious guesses only. We had suggested in a recent paper (Canadian Historical Review, vol. 96, no. 3) that this participation had been significantly higher, in part due to the contribution of Francophones from outside the province of Quebec. Information have now been extracted from enlistment sheets and one new B database, comprised of 10 ...


Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, April 15, 1918, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr. 2016 University of North Florida

Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, April 15, 1918, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr.

Ansel Brooks Smith, Sr. Letters

No abstract provided.


Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, No Date Noted, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr. 2016 University of North Florida

Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, No Date Noted, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr.

Ansel Brooks Smith, Sr. Letters

No abstract provided.


Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, February 28, 1918, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr. 2016 University of North Florida

Ansel Brooks Smith-Mrs. Marie Smith, February 28, 1918, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr.

Ansel Brooks Smith, Sr. Letters

No abstract provided.


The Poet's Corpus: Memory And Monumentality In Wilfred Owen's "The Show", Charles Hunter Joplin 2016 The University of Southern Mississippi

The Poet's Corpus: Memory And Monumentality In Wilfred Owen's "The Show", Charles Hunter Joplin

Master's Theses

Wilfred Owen is widely recognized to be the greatest English “trench poet” of the First World War. His posthumously published war poems sculpt a nightmarish vision of trench warfare, one which enables Western audiences to consider the suffering of the English soldiers and the brutality of modern warfare nearly a century after the armistice. However, critical readings of Owen’s canonized corpus, including “The Show” (1917, 1918), only focus on their hellish imagery. I will add to these readings by demonstrating that “The Show” is primarily concerned with the limitations of lyric poetry, the monumentality of poetic composition, and the ...


Mr. Jefferson's Army In Mr. Madison's War: Atrophy, Policy, And Legacy In The War Of 1812, David Alan Martin 2016 University of Southern Mississippi

Mr. Jefferson's Army In Mr. Madison's War: Atrophy, Policy, And Legacy In The War Of 1812, David Alan Martin

Master's Theses

President Thomas Jefferson is a well-known figure, who is not well understood. His military policies are under-examined in the historiography. Yet, he had a tremendous impact on martial development in the Early Republic. Jefferson reshaped the military to suite his pragmatic republican ideals. His militia system expanded while the regulars were disbanded. The Navy was greatly decreased, and the remainder of his military was used for frontier exploration, riverine trade, road development, and other public works. This disrupted the precedent of strong federal military development as set by his predecessors: George Washington and John Adams. His reforms also left the ...


Civil War - Brownsville, Kentucky (Sc 3039), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2016 Western Kentucky University

Civil War - Brownsville, Kentucky (Sc 3039), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and transcription (Click on "Additional Files" below) only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3039. Letter, 12 October 1861, to his father from an unidentified Confederate soldier in the 2nd Tennessee Cavalry Battalion. He describes his march from Bowling Green, Kentucky to Brownsville, Kentucky, and camp conditions. He also comments on Union sentiment there as distinct from abolitionism; describes an alarm raised in camp when one of the men was fired upon while watering his horse at Green River; and praises his captain for his treatment of the men and for discouraging any celebration when citizens were asked to ...


Alexander, Fay S., 1896-1972 (Sc 3038), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2016 Western Kentucky University

Alexander, Fay S., 1896-1972 (Sc 3038), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3038. Letter, 3 June 1918, of Fay S. Alexander to his parents in Ashland, Ohio. Writing from Camp Taylor, Kentucky, he reports on a quarantine due to measles, his meals, leisure and exercise, and refers to arguments among his “jolly bunch” of comrades.


The Battle Of Sekigahara, Nicholas Lanza 2016 La Salle University

The Battle Of Sekigahara, Nicholas Lanza

The Histories

The Battle of Sekigahara was a pivotal battle in October of 1600 that truly unified Japan and also established a new shogunate that lasted for 268 years. The battle was fought between two factions: the Eastern Army, under the command of Ieyasu Tokugawa, and the Western Army, commanded by Mitsunari Ishida. The forces at the Battle were roughly evenly matched, the outcome could have easily been different if not for the actions of certain commanders.


The Hessian "Invasion" Of The Newly Anointed United States, Matthew Fritz 2016 La Salle University

The Hessian "Invasion" Of The Newly Anointed United States, Matthew Fritz

The Histories

The American Revolution was not a bipolar war; the belligerents were not inclusive to Great Britain and its American colonies. The war saw the bringing in of France, Germany, Spain, and the Native Americans to the theater. Even though Germany was not unified at the time of the conflict, a certain area loaned out its troops to back Great Britain’s claims. These German soldiers were called Hessians, meaning they hailed from the Hesse-Cassel state. This group of German fighting men were well disciplined and well-trained. The British were aware of their successes and prowess; however, this reason alone was ...


Black Us Army Bands And Their Bandmasters In World War I (Version Of 07/29/2016), Peter M. Lefferts 2016 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Black Us Army Bands And Their Bandmasters In World War I (Version Of 07/29/2016), Peter M. Lefferts

Faculty Publications: School of Music

This essay sketches the story of the bands and bandmasters of the twenty seven new black army regiments which served in the U.S. Army in World War I. The new bands underwent rapid mobilization and demobilization over 1917-1919. They were for the most part unconnected by personnel or traditions to the long-established bands of the four black regular U.S. Army regiments that preceded them and that continued to serve outside Europe during and after the Great War. Pressed to find sufficient numbers of willing and able black band leaders for the new regiments, the army turned to schools ...


Mrs. Marie Smith-Ansel Brooks Smith, No Date Noted, Grand Rapids, Michigan, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr. 2016 University of North Florida

Mrs. Marie Smith-Ansel Brooks Smith, No Date Noted, Grand Rapids, Michigan, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr.

Ansel Brooks Smith, Sr. Letters

No abstract provided.


Ansel Brooks Smith- Mrs. Marie Smith, No Date Noted, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr. 2016 University of North Florida

Ansel Brooks Smith- Mrs. Marie Smith, No Date Noted, France, Ansel Brooks Smith Sr.

Ansel Brooks Smith, Sr. Letters

No abstract provided.


A Portrait Of Raymond Brutinel As A Young Man (Part I): The Future Machine Gun Commander In Edmonton, Alberta, 1905-1914, Cameron Pulsifer 2016 Wilfrid Laurier University

A Portrait Of Raymond Brutinel As A Young Man (Part I): The Future Machine Gun Commander In Edmonton, Alberta, 1905-1914, Cameron Pulsifer

Canadian Military History

Raymond Brutinel remains one of the Canadian Corps’ most intriguing and little understood senior officers. A fair amount has been written about his service with the Canadian Corps, which generally portrays him as a significant commander and military innovator. But his life before he joined the Canadian military largely remains a mystery, which Brutinel himself did little to clear up. He had emigrated from France to Edmonton, Alberta in 1905 and lived there until the outbreak of war. Yet little is known in detail about this formative period of his life. Based largely upon Edmonton-based sources, the following aims to ...


Booze, Temperance, And Soldiers On The Home Front: The Unraveling Of The Image Of The Idealised Soldier In Canada, Fay Wilson 2016 Wilfrid Laurier University

Booze, Temperance, And Soldiers On The Home Front: The Unraveling Of The Image Of The Idealised Soldier In Canada, Fay Wilson

Canadian Military History

In 1916, Canadians were swept up in the rhetoric of a purifying Holy War. The citizen soldier became the embodiment of Christ in the ultimate fight against evil. As the mirror for the nation, he reflected the moral character and aspirations of purity. The behaviour of soldiers stationed in Calgary were publically scrutinised, especially as to their use of alcohol. The evils of alcohol galvanised various groups to move towards Prohibition as the ultimate war measure. This directly affected military recruitment efforts and served to alienate the soldier and the reality of his experiences from the home front.


Law And Justice: Scott V. Canada And The History Of The Social Covenant With Canadian Veterans, Jonathan Minnes 2016 Wilfrid Laurier University

Law And Justice: Scott V. Canada And The History Of The Social Covenant With Canadian Veterans, Jonathan Minnes

Canadian Military History

In October 2012, supported by veteran advocacy group Equitas, Canadian Forces veterans of the Afghanistan campaign filed a class action lawsuit against the Federal Government. The case, Scott v. Canada, is named after lead Plaintiff Daniel Scott. In Scott, the Plaintiffs allege that under the recently enacted Canadian Forces Members and Veterans Re-establishment and Compensation Act, commonly known as the New Veterans Charter (NVC), many veterans receive less support than under the previous Pension Act. Further, they allege that the New Veterans Charter is a contravention of the ‘social covenant’ between Canadian citizens, the Canadian government, and past and present ...


Mcilvoy, Daniel Barnard "Doc," Jr., 1912-1998 (Sc 3036), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2016 Western Kentucky University

Mcilvoy, Daniel Barnard "Doc," Jr., 1912-1998 (Sc 3036), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3036. Materials relating to the World War II military service of Springfield, Kentucky native and Bowling Green physician Dr. Daniel B. McIlvoy in the U.S. Army Medical Corps. Includes narratives of his military career with the 82nd Airborne Division, his daughter’s account of a trip to sites in Normandy, France connected with her father, and clippings relating to a biography of McIlvoy by Michel DeTrez, published in 2004 as part of The Way We Were series (available in the Kentucky Library Research Collections; D769.348 505th .T76 2004). Also ...


Gorham, Fred Jaynes, 1878-1918 (Mss 583), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2016 Western Kentucky University

Gorham, Fred Jaynes, 1878-1918 (Mss 583), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 583. Correspondence and papers of Fred J. Gorham and wife Ethelyn Gorham of Henderson, Kentucky, chiefly regarding Fred’s Spanish-American War and World War I service, his death, and Ethelyn’s receipt of military benefits thereafter. Some family correspondence and data is included.


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