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Robust Feedback Control Based On Low Order Models With Uncertainty Estimation For A Class Of Biomedical Problems, Hector Puebla, Miguel A. Gutierrez-Limon, Eliseo Hernandez-Martinez, Alejandra Velasco-Perez 2016 Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana

Robust Feedback Control Based On Low Order Models With Uncertainty Estimation For A Class Of Biomedical Problems, Hector Puebla, Miguel A. Gutierrez-Limon, Eliseo Hernandez-Martinez, Alejandra Velasco-Perez

Annual Symposium on Biomathematics and Ecology: Education and Research

No abstract provided.


Industrial Solid-State Energy Harvesting: Mechanisms And Examples, Matthew Kocoloski, Carl Eger, Robin McCarty, Kevin P. Hallinan, J. Kelly Kissock 2016 Carnegie Mellon University

Industrial Solid-State Energy Harvesting: Mechanisms And Examples, Matthew Kocoloski, Carl Eger, Robin Mccarty, Kevin P. Hallinan, J. Kelly Kissock

J. Kissock

This paper explores the potential for solid-state energy harvesting in industrial applications. In contrast to traditional heat recovery, the output of solid-state devices is electricity, which can be readily used in virtually any plant. The progress in harvesting waste heat via thermoelectric and thermionic generators is described. With second law efficiencies now approaching 50% and 80% respectively, we show that these technologies are on the cusp of practical use. Finally, we present an example of energy harvesting using thermionic devices in an industrial application. The example considers energy harvesting from a furnace at a glass manufacturing facility where exhaust gases ...


The Key Ideas Of Mdw Viii: A Summary, Aaron Altman, Clive L. Dym, Ray Hurwitz, John W. Wesner 2016 University of Dayton

The Key Ideas Of Mdw Viii: A Summary, Aaron Altman, Clive L. Dym, Ray Hurwitz, John W. Wesner

Aaron Altman

This paper summarizes and highlights the presentations and discussions that took place during Mudd Design Workshop VIII, ‘Design Education: Innovation and Entrepreneurship,’ at Harvey Mudd College. This paper also describes both the key ideas that emerged from the presentations and discussions of the participating engineering design educators, practitioners and researchers, and the methodology used to capture and retain those ideas. Additionally, this paper proposes a framework of design competencies that were created and evolved by the workshop’s participants as a response to a question posed at one of the workshop sessions: ‘What are the minimum design competencies students should ...


Design Methodology For Low Speed High Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Aaron Altman 2016 University of Dayton

Design Methodology For Low Speed High Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Aaron Altman

Aaron Altman

High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's) are increasingly being considered to perform a wide range of tasks. Recent years have seen greater value of UAV's in the military reconnaissance arena, first in the Persian Gulf war, with the use of small UAV's, and more recently over Bosnia with medium sized UAV's.

The NASA ERAST program uses HALE UAV's for environmental sensing and monitoring. The military has investigated using HALE UAV's for Theater Ballistic Missile defense, as well as general battlefield reconnaissance. Proposals have been made to use HALE UAV's for ...


Wing Tip Vortices From An Exergy-Based Perspective, Muhammad Omar Memon, Kevin Wabick, Aaron Altman, Rainer M. Buffo 2016 University of Dayton

Wing Tip Vortices From An Exergy-Based Perspective, Muhammad Omar Memon, Kevin Wabick, Aaron Altman, Rainer M. Buffo

Aaron Altman

The lens of exergy is used to investigate a wingtip vortex in the near wake over a range of angles of attack. Exergy is the measure of thermodynamically “available” energy as determined through the more discriminating second law of thermodynamics. Experiments were conducted in a water tunnel at Institute of Aerospace Systems at Aachen.

The data were taken three chord lengths downstream in the Trefftz plane of an aspect ratio 5 Clark-Y wing with a square-edged wing tip using particle image velocimetry. Intuitively, the minimum available energy state is expected to correspond to the maximum lift-to-drag ratio angle of attack ...


A Multi-Directional Treadmill Training Program For Improving Gait, Balance, And Mobility In Individuals With Parkinson’S Disease: A Case Series, Kimberly Smith, Kurt Jackson, Kimberly Edginton Bigelow, Lloyd L. Laubach 2016 University of Dayton

A Multi-Directional Treadmill Training Program For Improving Gait, Balance, And Mobility In Individuals With Parkinson’S Disease: A Case Series, Kimberly Smith, Kurt Jackson, Kimberly Edginton Bigelow, Lloyd L. Laubach

Kimberly Edginton Bigelow

Treadmill training is a commonly used intervention for improving gait in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, little is known about how treadmill training may also influence balance and other aspects of mobility.

The purpose of this case series was to explore the feasibility and possible benefits of multi-directional treadmill training for individuals with PD. Four participants (62.3 ± 6.5 yrs, Hoehn & Yahr 2-4) performed 8 weeks of treadmill training 3 times per week. Weeks 1-4 included forward walking only, while weeks 5-8 included forward and multi-directional walking. Participants were tested every 4 weeks on 4 separate occasions ...


Leveraging Students’ Passion And Creativity: Ethos At The University Of Dayton, Margaret Pinnell, Malcolm Daniels, Kevin P. Hallinan, Gretchen Berkemeier 2016 University of Dayton

Leveraging Students’ Passion And Creativity: Ethos At The University Of Dayton, Margaret Pinnell, Malcolm Daniels, Kevin P. Hallinan, Gretchen Berkemeier

Margaret Pinnell

The Engineers in Technical Humanitarian Opportunities of Service-learning (ETHOS) program was developed in the spring of 2001 by an interdisciplinary group (electrical, chemical, civil and mechanical) of undergraduate engineering students at the University of Dayton (UD). ETHOS was founded on the belief that engineers are more apt and capable to appropriately serve our world if they have an understanding of technology’s global linkage with values, culture, society, politics, and the economy. Since 2001, the ETHOS program at UD has grown and changed.

From conceptualization, to implementation, to maturation and national recognition, the program has addressed challenges of academic acceptance ...


Novel Platform Development Using An Assembly Of Carbon Nanotube, Nanogold And Immobilized Rna Capture Element Towards Rapid, Selective Sensing Of Bacteria, Elizabeth I. Maurer, Kristen K. Comfort, Saber M. Hussain, John J. Schlager, Sharmila M. Mukhopadhyay 2016 Wright State University - Main Campus

Novel Platform Development Using An Assembly Of Carbon Nanotube, Nanogold And Immobilized Rna Capture Element Towards Rapid, Selective Sensing Of Bacteria, Elizabeth I. Maurer, Kristen K. Comfort, Saber M. Hussain, John J. Schlager, Sharmila M. Mukhopadhyay

Sharmila M. Mukhopadhyay

This study examines the creation of a nano-featured biosensor platform designed for the rapid and selective detection of the bacterium Escherichia coli. The foundation of this sensor is carbon nanotubes decorated with gold nanoparticles that are modified with a specific, surface adherent ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequence element. The multi-step sensor assembly was accomplished by growing carbon nanotubes on a graphite substrate, the direct synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the nanotube surface, and the attachment of thiolated RNA to the bound nanoparticles.

The application of the compounded nanomaterials for sensor development has the distinct advantage of retaining the electrical behavior property ...


Somatic Stimulation Causes Frontoparietal Cortical Changes In Neonates: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study, Nasser H. Kashou, Irfaan Akram Dar, Kathryn Hasenstab, Ramzi W. Nahhas, Sudarshan R. Jadcherla 2016 Wright State University - Main Campus

Somatic Stimulation Causes Frontoparietal Cortical Changes In Neonates: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study, Nasser H. Kashou, Irfaan Akram Dar, Kathryn Hasenstab, Ramzi W. Nahhas, Sudarshan R. Jadcherla

Biomedical, Industrial & Human Factors Engineering Faculty Publications

Palmar and plantar grasp are the foremost primitive neonatal reflexes and functions. Persistence of these reflexes in infancy is a sign of evolving cerebral palsy. Our aims were to establish measurement feasibility in a clinical setting and to characterize changes in oxyhemoglobin (HbO) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbD) concentration in the bilateral frontoparietal cortex in unsedated neonates at the crib-side using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We hypothesized that bilateral concentration changes will occur upon somatic central and peripheral somatic stimulation. Thirteen preterm neonates (five males) underwent time 1, and six (two males) returned for time 2 (mean PMA ¼ 41.6 and ...


Modeling Effective Connectivity In High-Dimensional Cortical Source Signals, Yuxiao Wang, Chee-Ming Ting PhD, Hernando Ombao 2016 University of California, Irvine

Modeling Effective Connectivity In High-Dimensional Cortical Source Signals, Yuxiao Wang, Chee-Ming Ting Phd, Hernando Ombao

Chee-Ming Ting PhD

To study effective connectivity among sources in a densely voxelated (high-dimensional) cortical surface, we develop the source-space factor VAR model. The first step in our procedure is to estimate cortical activity from multichannel electroencephalograms (EEG) using anatomically constrained brain imaging methods. Following parcellation of the cortical surface into disjoint regions of interest (ROIs), latent factors within each ROI are computed using principal component analysis. These factors are ROI-specific low-rank approximations (or representations) which allow for efficient estimation of connectivity in the high-dimensional cortical source space. The second step is to model effective connectivity between ROIs by fitting a VAR model ...


A Study On Biocompatibility Of Carbon Nanoparticles In Hela Cells Dictated By Synthesis And Sterilization, Elisa Panzarini, Cristian Vergallo, Stefania Mariano 2016 University of Salento

A Study On Biocompatibility Of Carbon Nanoparticles In Hela Cells Dictated By Synthesis And Sterilization, Elisa Panzarini, Cristian Vergallo, Stefania Mariano

Kevin Lee

Due to their unique chemical and physical properties, carbon-based NanoMaterials (C-NMs) are largely exploited in biomedicine, i.e., cell and tissue imaging, drug delivery and tissue engineering scaffold, even if reports regarding their toxicity are still conflicting. In fact, biological effects strictly depend on the dynamic physicochemical characteristics of C-NMs, which in turn are strongly influenced by the procedures of their synthesis, and nanometrological techniques, e.g., Electron Microscopy (EM)-based analysis, are becoming the main tool for researchers to characterize nanoproducts. The aim of the present work is the study of the influence of synthesis and sterilization protocols on ...


Fabrication And Evaluation Of Magnetic Micro Actuators For Implantable Self-Clearing Glaucoma Drainage Devices, Haritha Ramadorai, Hyunsu Park, Hyowon Lee 2016 Purdue University

Fabrication And Evaluation Of Magnetic Micro Actuators For Implantable Self-Clearing Glaucoma Drainage Devices, Haritha Ramadorai, Hyunsu Park, Hyowon Lee

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

According to the World Health Organization, glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world. It currently affects more than 2.7 million people in the United States alone and over 79.6 million people worldwide are estimated to be inflicted by this debilitating disease by 2020. Glaucoma patients are often characterized with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and are treated with implantation of glaucoma drainage devices (GDD) to maintain optimum IOP. Although initially effective at delaying glaucoma progression, contemporary GDD often lead to numerous complications and only 50% of implanted devices remain functional after 5 years. Biofouling is ...


Pathway By Which Vagus Nerve Stimulation Of B Fibers Affects Heart Rate, Kelsey Wasilczuk, Matthew Ward, Pedro Irazoqui 2016 Purdue University

Pathway By Which Vagus Nerve Stimulation Of B Fibers Affects Heart Rate, Kelsey Wasilczuk, Matthew Ward, Pedro Irazoqui

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Heart failure (HF) affects over 5 million adults in the United States. Many HF patients have a high resting heart rate, which is correlated with a high mortality rate. In recent years, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has become an increasingly researched therapy to reduce the resting heart rate of HF patients. However, current dosage given during VNS is increased incrementally at the doctor’s office until side effects present themselves in a patient. In addition, the means by which the therapy works is not completely understood. To better understand the therapy’s mechanisms, the right cervical vagus nerve of several ...


Measurement Of Hydrogen Peroxide Influx Into Cells: Preparation For Measurement Using On-Chip Microelectrode Array, Hannah R. Kriscovich, Sarah M. Libring, Siddarth V. Sridharan, James K. Nolan, Jose F. Rivera, Jenna L. Rickus, David B. Janes 2016 Georgia Institute of Technology

Measurement Of Hydrogen Peroxide Influx Into Cells: Preparation For Measurement Using On-Chip Microelectrode Array, Hannah R. Kriscovich, Sarah M. Libring, Siddarth V. Sridharan, James K. Nolan, Jose F. Rivera, Jenna L. Rickus, David B. Janes

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is commonly known as a toxic reactive oxidative species (ROS) for cells. Recent studies have found evidence that H2O2 is also an important cellular signalling molecule. Quantifying cellular influx of H2O2 will contribute to researchers’ understanding of the role H2O2 plays in healthy cells and cells involved in the progression of cancers and degenerative diseases. This work utilizes an assay kit and fluorescence techniques to evaluate cell lines and conditions to create a model biological system for measuring cellular H2O2 consumption. Pancreatic ...


Ball Pressure Correlations With Peak Impact Force And The Potential For Cumulative Mtbi When Heading A Soccer Ball, Nicolas Leiva, Daniel Y. Shyu, Josh Auger, Eric Nauman 2016 Universidad de Los Andes - Colombia

Ball Pressure Correlations With Peak Impact Force And The Potential For Cumulative Mtbi When Heading A Soccer Ball, Nicolas Leiva, Daniel Y. Shyu, Josh Auger, Eric Nauman

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Soccer is a unique sport in which athletes use their heads as tools for gameplay, which may ultimately cause cumulative traumatic brain injuries. Due to rising popularity of soccer in the United States alongside the increased occurrence of CTE and mTBI in other contact sports, there is a growing concern over how to keep the repetitive forces caused by heading, as low as possible. Different variables that can affect the peak force felt when heading a soccer ball can be simulated and compared with in-game data, however, this has never been properly tested before. In the present study two size ...


Cellular Model Of Hydrogen Peroxide Release: In Preparation For On-Chip Sensor Measurements, Sarah M. Libring, Hannah R. Kriscovich, James K. Nolan, Siddarth V. Sridharan, Jose F. Rivera, David B. Janes, Jenna L. Rickus 2016 Rutgers University - New Brunswick/Piscataway

Cellular Model Of Hydrogen Peroxide Release: In Preparation For On-Chip Sensor Measurements, Sarah M. Libring, Hannah R. Kriscovich, James K. Nolan, Siddarth V. Sridharan, Jose F. Rivera, David B. Janes, Jenna L. Rickus

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Hydrogen peroxide is traditionally associated with cellular damage; however, recent studies show that low levels of H2O2 are released by cells as part of normal intercellular communication. The mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide transport, uptake and release, and biological effects are not yet well known but have important implications for cancer, stem cells, and aging. Standard H2O2 assays cannot make spatially or temporally resolved quantitative measurements at a cellular scale. Previously we developed a microelectrode array (MEA) and calibration methods for quantifying H2O2 gradients in space and time. The sensor was validated ...


Activity Of Protein Kinase A Attached To Magnetic Beads, Kevin P. Lin, Tamara L. Kinzer-Ursem, Mrugesh K. Parasa 2016 Purdue University

Activity Of Protein Kinase A Attached To Magnetic Beads, Kevin P. Lin, Tamara L. Kinzer-Ursem, Mrugesh K. Parasa

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Development of high throughput assays is a crucial step in developing more efficient techniques that aid in many important areas of research today such as drug development or identification of protein structure function relationships. Integration of high throughput assays into more research efforts could drastically decrease the time and cost it takes for a new drug to hit the market. Protein Kinase A (PKA) is an extensively studied protein as it is highly upregulated in cancer and is a hot spot for drug targeting. In this work, azide-tagged PKA is covalently attached to magnetic beads using azide-alkyne cycloaddition, a well-known ...


Nanobubbles Provide Theranostic Relief To Cancer Hypoxia, Christopher M. Long, Pushpak N. Bhandari, Joseph Irudayaraj 2016 Purdue University

Nanobubbles Provide Theranostic Relief To Cancer Hypoxia, Christopher M. Long, Pushpak N. Bhandari, Joseph Irudayaraj

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Hypoxia is a common motif among tumors, contributing to metastasis, angiogenesis, cellular epigenetic abnormality, and resistance to cancer therapy. Hypoxia also plays a pivotal role in oncological studies, where it can be used as a principal target for new anti-cancer therapeutic methods. Oxygen nanobubbles were designed in an effort to target the hypoxic tumor regions, thus interrupting the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) regulatory pathway and inhibiting tumor progression. At less than 100nm, oxygen nanobubbles act as a vehicle for site-specific oxygen delivery, while also serving as an ultrasound contrast agent for advanced imaging purposes. Through in vitro and in vivo studies ...


Lipid Detection In Pig Arteries Using Intravascular Photoacoustic Imaging, Jieying Mai, Yingchun Cao, Ayeeshik Kole, Michael Sturek, Ji-Xin Cheng 2016 Purdue University

Lipid Detection In Pig Arteries Using Intravascular Photoacoustic Imaging, Jieying Mai, Yingchun Cao, Ayeeshik Kole, Michael Sturek, Ji-Xin Cheng

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Each year over 370,000 people died from coronary artery disease in America. As the primary form of coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis behaves as lipid-rich plaque development inside an artery wall. Vulnerable plaques are those prone to rupture, which may result in thrombus or even death. Typical hallmarks of a vulnerable plaque include thin fibrous cap, a large lipid-rich necrotic core and inflammatory infiltrate. The identification and accurate detection of these lipid depositions in the arterial wall is crucial in the diagnosis of atherosclerosis. However, none ...


Bone Tissue Engineering: Scalability And Optimization Of Densified Collagen-Fibril Bone Graft Substitute Materials, John G. Nicholas, Lauren E. Watkins, Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin 2016 Purdue University

Bone Tissue Engineering: Scalability And Optimization Of Densified Collagen-Fibril Bone Graft Substitute Materials, John G. Nicholas, Lauren E. Watkins, Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Over 240 million people missing teeth worldwide experience lingering problems such as difficulty speaking and eating, undesirable aesthetics, and resorption of bone supporting neighboring teeth. The gold standard of treatment utilizes grafts to attach a function-restoring implant to supporting bone. Current graft materials suffer from problems including autologous donor site morbidity, long resorption time, incomplete integration with the maxillae or mandible, and structural weakness. Patient-specific, cellularized bone grafts may be a solution to these issues by accelerating and improving the quality of regenerated bone. Recently, encapsulation of mesenchymal stem cells within self-assembling type I collagen oligomer matrices has been shown ...


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