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Phonetics and Phonology Commons

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Individual And Group Differences In Sound Category Learning, Ben Carlstrom 2017 Portland State University

Individual And Group Differences In Sound Category Learning, Ben Carlstrom

Student Research Symposium

Abstract: We examined the role of procedural-, declarative-, and working-memory systems in adults learning novel sound categories. Adults have fully developed declarative-memory skills that sometimes inhibit their ability to learn implicitly/procedurally (Filoteo, Lauritzen, & Maddox, 2010). Models of impaired language like the Procedural Deficit Hypothesis suggest that procedural-memory deficits are predictive of language-learning outcomes (Lum, Conti-Ramsden, Page, & Ullman, 2011). This study tested the hypothesis that language structure is best learned implicitly/procedurally, which has implications for L2 learning and language impairment. The novel sound categories presented to participants varied along a phonologically non-native dimension, pitch, and a native dimension, vowel ...


Cross-Linguistic Phonosemantics, Raleigh Anne Butler 2017 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Cross-Linguistic Phonosemantics, Raleigh Anne Butler

University of Tennessee Honors Thesis Projects

No abstract provided.


American English Speakers' Perception Of Non-Native Phonotactic Constraints: The Influence Of Training In Phonology, Bailey R. Pearson 2017 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

American English Speakers' Perception Of Non-Native Phonotactic Constraints: The Influence Of Training In Phonology, Bailey R. Pearson

Rehabilitation, Human Resources and Communication Disorders Undergraduate Honors Theses

The purpose of the present study was to examine the differences between perceptions of non-native phonotactic rules and constraints by monolingual English-speaking undergraduate students in a program of communication disorders who had taken and passed a course in the study of phonology and by undergraduate students in communication disorders who had not yet taken a course in phonology. Participants listened to audio recordings of words from Hindi, Hmong, Kurdish, Russian, and Swedish recorded by speakers fluent in those languages. Each of the words contained at least one phonotactic constraint that is not permitted in American English phonology. Participants were instructed ...


Ambisyllabic Consonant Lengthening In English, Alexa Rosalsky 2017 College of William and Mary

Ambisyllabic Consonant Lengthening In English, Alexa Rosalsky

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Ambisyllabic consonants are thought to be shared between two syllables and form both a coda and an onset while not being notably longer than singleton consonants. This thesis attempts to determine whether these ambisyllabic consonants pattern durationally like onset, codas, or neither through a production experiment using nonce words. This not only provides evidence for how the words are actually syllabified, it also may give insight into why such consonants are perceived as being shared by two syllables by many speakers. A production experiment finds that "ambisyllabic" consonants pattern durationally like onsets. This strongly suggests that they are onsets and ...


Language Analysis Skills Of Children With Mental Retardation, Hyla Rubin 2016 The College of New Rochelle

Language Analysis Skills Of Children With Mental Retardation, Hyla Rubin

Hyla Rubin

The ability of children with moderate mental retardation to analyze orally presented sentences into words and words into syllables and phonemes was studied. The subjects, ages 10 to 15, were grouped by method of reading instruction. All of them could analyze spoken sentences into words and words into syllables equally well. However, subjects receiving code-emphasis reading instruction performed significantly better on the more difficult phoneme manipulation tasks than did subjects receiving whole-word instruction. Results suggest that code-emphasis reading instruction for some subjects with mental retardation should be used. Further research on linguistic analysis skills and the use of code-emphasis reading ...


Integrating Sound Symbolism With Core Grammar: The Case Of Expressive Palatalization, John Alderete, Alexei Kochetov 2016 Simon Fraser University

Integrating Sound Symbolism With Core Grammar: The Case Of Expressive Palatalization, John Alderete, Alexei Kochetov

Alexei Kochetov

Fifty cases of sound-symbolic expressive palatalization were collected in a typological survey of babytalk registers, diminutive constructions, and other sound symbolic systems. Analysis of the typological trends and language-particular examples reveals important differences between expressive palatalization and phonologically motivated palatalization. To account for expressive palatalization, we propose a novel set of Express(X) constraints in Optimality Theory. The integration of the Express(X) constraints with the rest of phonology is shown to explain the typological differences between expressive and phonological palatalization, account for the phonological extension of expressive palatalization, and constitute a general theoretical framework for sound symbolic phonological patterns.


An On-Line Supplement To Alderete & Kochetov (To Appear), Language, John Alderete, Alexei Kochetov 2016 Simon Fraser University

An On-Line Supplement To Alderete & Kochetov (To Appear), Language, John Alderete, Alexei Kochetov

Alexei Kochetov

No abstract provided.


Phonological Awareness: Normally Developing And Language Delayed Children, Hyla Rubin 2016 The College of New Rochelle

Phonological Awareness: Normally Developing And Language Delayed Children, Hyla Rubin

Hyla Rubin

This study compared 15 nonnal and 13 language delayed fourand five-year-old children on a range of tasks of phonological awareness. The tasks differed in the degree of explicit linguistic analysis that was required. The language delayed group always performed below the level of the nonnal children, and there were significant group differences on several tasks. A significant interaction effect reflected the greater difficulty language delayed children experienced with tasks that required the most explicit analysis. The tasks used in this study could be used in intervention research with language delayed children. They can also be used in therapy and classroom ...


Contextualized Recognition Of Fingerspelled Words, Campbell McDermid, Lynn Finton, Alexis Chasney 2016 National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Contextualized Recognition Of Fingerspelled Words, Campbell Mcdermid, Lynn Finton, Alexis Chasney

Journal of Interpretation

Fingerspelling, an aspect of American Sign Language, is difficult for second language English-speaking adults to learn (Bahleda, 1998), yet mastery is required by professional ASL-English interpreters. This study compared novice and expert interpreters’ interpretation of fingerspelled words under the assumption that exposure to priming material in their L1, English, would enable the interpreters to recognize those terms when fingerspelled in their L2, ASL. In this study, participants (15 novices, 15 experts) were asked to interpret an ASL text with 25 “carefully” fingerspelled words embedded. Ten subjects were not given priming materials, ten a list of words in printed English that ...


Therapy Dogs In The College Classroom: The Effect Of Dogs On Stress, Anxiety, And Spanish L2 Phonological Learning And Performance, Elaine Maralee Henry 2016 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Therapy Dogs In The College Classroom: The Effect Of Dogs On Stress, Anxiety, And Spanish L2 Phonological Learning And Performance, Elaine Maralee Henry

Doctoral Dissertations

Anxiety and stress invoked by the second language classroom setting has the ability to cause numerous detrimental physiological changes which impair the learning process. A more natural, “immersion” type atmosphere is often desired when teaching a second language; however, this is not typically possible with college classes. Therefore, the addition of therapy dogs to college second language classes may be a beneficial solution since therapy dogs are frequently cited as having the ability to lower stress and anxiety in many different settings. Stroking and interacting with a dog may reduce many markers of stress, including blood pressure, heart rate, and ...


Supralaryngeal Implementation Of Length And Laryngeal Contrasts In Japanese And Korean, Alexei Kochetov, Yoonjung Kang 2016 University of Toronto, Scarborough

Supralaryngeal Implementation Of Length And Laryngeal Contrasts In Japanese And Korean, Alexei Kochetov, Yoonjung Kang

Alexei Kochetov

This paper investigates supralaryngeal characteristics of Japanese and Korean length and laryngeal contrasts in stops and affricates. Electropalatography data collected from 5 Japanese and 5 Korean speakers revealed similar differences among the consonants in the degree of linguopalatal contact and duration of the closure. Japanese (voiceless) geminate and Korean fortis obstruents were most constricted and had the longest duration (although considerably longer in Japanese). Japanese voiced and Korean lenis obstruents were least constricted and had the shortest duration. Japanese voiceless (singleton) and Korean aspirated obstruents showed intermediate degree of contact and duration. Both stops and affricates showed a positive correlation ...


The Language Identification Problem: Formant Analysis And Cross-Linguistic Uniqueness, Lyndon Rey 2016 The University of Western Ontario

The Language Identification Problem: Formant Analysis And Cross-Linguistic Uniqueness, Lyndon Rey

Western Papers in Linguistics / Cahiers linguistiques de Western

In the field of computational linguistics, spoken language recognition (through the use of wordlists and morphological markers) is a resource-intensive process: the input must be parsed from the inputted speech signal, words must be hypothesized, and then subsequently word-lists for any likely language must be iterated through. To note, spoken language recognition does not refer to the process of identifying the meaning of the input; rather, it is finding the language of which the speaker is speaking (not necessarily 'parsing' the input). In my research, the question of whether a language can be positively and uniquely identified through small nuances ...


Palatalization And Glide Strengthening As Competing Repair Strategies: Evidence From Kirundi, Alexei Kochetov 2016 University of Toronto

Palatalization And Glide Strengthening As Competing Repair Strategies: Evidence From Kirundi, Alexei Kochetov

Alexei Kochetov

Alternations involving place-changing palatalization (e.g. t+j à ʧ in spirit – spiritual) are very common and have been a focus of much generative phonological work since Chomsky & Halle’s (1968) ‘Sound Pattern of English’. The interest in palatalization and its mechanisms (see e.g. Sagey 1990; Chen 1996; Bateman 2007) has somewhat obscured the question of how these processes fit into a wider typology of segmental alternations. What happens when palatalization fails to apply? Do other processes take its place and apply under the same circumstances? In this paper, I argue for a close functional and formal affinity between ...


A Conventional Orthography For Maghrebi Arabic, Houcemeddine Turki, Emad Adel, Tariq Daouda, Nassim Regragui 2016 Lycée secondaire Sbikha 1979

A Conventional Orthography For Maghrebi Arabic, Houcemeddine Turki, Emad Adel, Tariq Daouda, Nassim Regragui

Imed Adel


Maghrebi Arabic is the set of dialects of the Arabic language spoken in the Maghreb (Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Libya and Mauritania). This set of dialects is under-resourced and has neither a standard orthography nor large collections of written text and dictionaries. Actually, there is no strict separation between Modern Standard Arabic, the official language of the government, media and education, and Maghrebi Arabic; the two exist on a continuum dominated by mixed forms. In this paper, we present a conventional orthography for Maghrebi Arabic, following a previous effort on developing a conventional orthography for Dialectal Arabic (or CODA) demonstrated for ...


A Conventional Orthography For Maghrebi Arabic, Houcemeddine Turki, Emad Adel, Tariq Daouda, Nassim Regragui 2016 Lycée secondaire Sbikha 1979

A Conventional Orthography For Maghrebi Arabic, Houcemeddine Turki, Emad Adel, Tariq Daouda, Nassim Regragui

Houcemeddine Turki


Maghrebi Arabic is the set of dialects of the Arabic language spoken in the Maghreb (Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Libya and Mauritania). This set of dialects is under-resourced and has neither a standard orthography nor large collections of written text and dictionaries. Actually, there is no strict separation between Modern Standard Arabic, the official language of the government, media and education, and Maghrebi Arabic; the two exist on a continuum dominated by mixed forms. In this paper, we present a conventional orthography for Maghrebi Arabic, following a previous effort on developing a conventional orthography for Dialectal Arabic (or CODA) demonstrated for ...


What’S In A Name? Sound Symbolism And Coffee Shops, Claire Anderson 2016 Cedarville University

What’S In A Name? Sound Symbolism And Coffee Shops, Claire Anderson

Linguistics Senior Research Projects

This study explores the relationship between sound symbolism and coffee shop names. Specifically, phonetic qualities in coffee shop names have crossmodal associations with other sensory experiences such as taste, sight, sound, and touch. Previous studies show a strong association between product or brand name and consumer preference; therefore, a study of coffee shop names is worthwhile in expanding the corpus of sound symbolism knowledge. A phonetic analysis of top-rated coffee shops in the United States, paired with a survey, shows that a balance of stops and smoother phonemes (fricatives, nasals, laterals, etc.), as well as a mixture of front and ...


Effects Of Online Repetition Practice With Animated Visual Aid On The Acquisition Of Japanese Pitch Accent And Special Moras, Natsumi Suzuki, Mayu Miyamoto 2016 Purdue University

Effects Of Online Repetition Practice With Animated Visual Aid On The Acquisition Of Japanese Pitch Accent And Special Moras, Natsumi Suzuki, Mayu Miyamoto

Purdue Languages and Cultures Conference

This preliminary study examines the effectiveness of online repetition practice using an animated visual aid, "Karaoke Style", in promoting acquisition of Japanese pitch accent and special moras that could be applied to the curriiculum without using any class time.


The Theory And Practice Of Harmonic Serialism, John McCarthy 2016 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

The Theory And Practice Of Harmonic Serialism, John Mccarthy

John J. McCarthy

This chapter explains what Harmonic Serialism is and how it differs from standard parallel Optimality Theory. Several arguments in support of Harmonic Serialism are presented.


Cross-Level Interactions In Harmonic Serialism, John McCarthy, Joe Pater, Kathryn Pruitt 2016 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Cross-Level Interactions In Harmonic Serialism, John Mccarthy, Joe Pater, Kathryn Pruitt

John J. McCarthy

Cross-level interactions are phonological processes that make reference to multiple levels of the prosodic hierarchy, such as vowel shortening in the weak position of a foot. Cross-level interactions figure in most arguments for parallelism in Optimality Theory. This chapter demonstrates with several case studies how cross-level interactions can be analyzed in Harmonic Serialism. The key insight is that the relevant constraints may be violated in the course of the derivation, even if they are obeyed in underlying and surface forms. Cross-level interactions require parallelism only if constraints are inviolable, but that is inconsistent with a fundamental premise of Harmonic Serialism ...


The Representation Of Probabilistic Phonological Patterns: Neurological, Behavioral, And Computational Evidence From The English Stress System, Claire Moore-Cantwell 2016 University of Massachusetts Amherst

The Representation Of Probabilistic Phonological Patterns: Neurological, Behavioral, And Computational Evidence From The English Stress System, Claire Moore-Cantwell

Doctoral Dissertations May 2014 - current

This dissertation investigates the cognitive mechanism underlying language users' ability to generalize probabilistic phonological patterns in their lexicon to novel words. Specifically, do speakers represent probabilistic patterns using abstract grammatical constraints? If so, this system of constraints would, like categorical phonological generalizations (a) be limited in the space of possible generalizations it can represent, and (b) apply to known and novel words alike without reference to specific known words. I examine these two predictions, comparing them to the predictions of alternative models. Analogical models are specifically considered. In chapter 3 I examine speakers' productions of novel words without near lexical ...


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